1.  27
    Douglas A. Marshall (2002). Behavior, Belonging, and Belief: A Theory of Ritual Practice. Sociological Theory 20 (3):360-380.
    A new model of ritual based on Durkheim's ([1912] 1995) theory is developed. It is argued that ritual practices generate belief and belonging in participants by activating multiple social-psychological mechanisms that interactively create the characteristic outcomes of ritual. Specifically, the distinctive elements of ritual practice are shown to induce altered subjective states and effortful and/or anomalous behaviors, which are subsequently misattributed in such a way that belief and belonging are created or maintained around the focus of ritual attention. These processes (...)
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  2. Douglas A. Marshall (2002). Behavior, Belonging, and Belief: A Theory of Ritual Practice. Sociological Theory 20 (3):360-380.
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    Douglas A. Marshall (2010). Temptation, Tradition, and Taboo: A Theory of Sacralization. Sociological Theory 28 (1):64-90.
    A theory of sacralization is offered in which the sacred emerges from the collision of temptation and tradition. It is proposed that when innate or acquired desires to behave in one way conflict with socially acquired and/or mediated drives to behave in another way, actors ascribe sacredness to the objects of their action as a means of reconciling the difference between their desired and actual behavior toward those objects. After establishing the sacred as a theoretical construct, the theory is (...)
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