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  1. Ole Martin Skilleås & Douglas Burnham (2014). Categories and Appreciation – A Reply to Sackris. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):551-557.
    In his article “Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine” in this journal, David Sackris presents arguments against Kendall Walton’s view in the famous article “Categories of Art.”David Sackris, “Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine,” The Journal of Value Inquiry, 47 (2013), pp. 111–120; Kendall Walton, “Categories of Art,” in Steven M. Cahn and Aaron Meskin (Eds) Aesthetics: A Comprehensive Anthology. (Oxford: Blackwell, 2007), pp. 521–537. [First published in The Philosophical Review, 79 (1970), pp. 334–367.] He claims, (...)
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  2. Douglas Burnham (2012). The Aesthetics of Wine. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction 1. Basic Concepts 2. Wine as an Object 3. Wine and Cognition 4. Aesthetic Attributes 5. Taste and Expertise 6. The Wineworld Bibliography.
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  3. Ole Martin Skilleas & Douglas Burnham (2012). Patterns of Attention: Project and the Phenomenology of Aesthetic Perception. Rivista di Estetica 51 (1):117-136.
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  4. Douglas Burnham & George Papandreopoulos (2011). Existentialism. In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. Douglas Burnham (2010). Nietzsche's the Birth of Tragedy: A Reader's Guide. Continuum.
    Introduction -- Context -- Overview of themes -- Reading the text -- Reception and influence.
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  6. Douglas Burnham (2010). Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Indiana University Press.
    This book is a section by section commentary on Nietzsche's attempt to pursue philosophy in a radically different form of writing. Included are sustained discussions and clarifications of Nietzsche's philosophical analysis of culture, life, the will-to-power, time and the 'individual'. Also, the book represents one of the first full-length attempts to document the relationships that Nietzsche constructs between style, form and philosophy.
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  7. Douglas Burnham & Melanie Ebdon (2009). Philosophy, Literature and Interpretation. In John Mullarkey & Beth Lord (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy. Continuum. 238.
    This chapter considers the relationship between philosophy and literature both as forms of writing and thinking, but also (which is a more original contribution) as historically specific instititutions of enquiry. The argument is that part of the historical and cultural situatedness of philosophy is as a written form of cultural production, but one located within institutions (Universities above all) that already have a different 'department' specialising in understanding written forms of cultural production. This suggests that there might be an overlooked (...)
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  8. Douglas Burnham (2008). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Indiana University Press.
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  9. Douglas Burnham & Ole Martin Skilleås (2008). You'll Never Drink Alone: Wine Tasting and Aesthetic Practice. In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Wine and Philosophy. Blackwell.
     
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  10. Douglas Burnham (2007). Heidegger, Kant and 'Dirty' Politics. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (1):67-86.
    This article begins with the hypothesis that much modern political thought can be understood according to a distinction between transcendent and immanent accounts of judgement. These two positions are analysed as to their correspondingly entailed accounts of the origin, legitimacy and nature of political community. Using Heidegger and a Heideggerian reading of Kant on the nature of judgement, it is then shown that both accounts of judgement are in fact metaphysically derivative (the ‘dirty’ of the title) and in precisely the (...)
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  11. Douglas Burnham, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: Metaphysics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Douglas Burnham, Immanuel Kant: Aesthetics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  13. Douglas Burnham, René Descartes. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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