Search results for 'Douglas Erlandson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Douglas Erlandson & Charles Sayward (1981). Is Heaven a Possible World? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (1):55 - 58.score: 240.0
    The goal of theodicy is to show how God could create our world with all its evil. This paper argues that the theodicist can achieve her goal only if she gives up one of these three propositions: (1) evil does not exist in heaven; (2) heaven is better than the present world; (3) heaven is a possible world. Second, it is argued that the theodicist can reject (3) without giving up her belief that heaven exists, so that (3) is her (...)
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  2. Douglas K. Erlandson (1978). Timelessness, Immutability, and Eschatology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (3):129 - 145.score: 240.0
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  3. Douglas Erlandson (1980). Body Transfer and Disembodiment. Philosophical Studies 37 (1):13 - 19.score: 240.0
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  4. Douglas K. Erlandson (1977). A New Look at Miracles. Religious Studies 13 (4):417 - 428.score: 240.0
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  5. Angela E. Douglas (2011). SymbiosisThe Symbiotic Habit.Angela E. Douglas . Princeton University Press , 2010 . 214 Pp., Illus. $45.00 (ISBN 9780691113418 Cloth). [REVIEW] Bioscience 61 (4):326-327.score: 180.0
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  6. J. Douglas (2006). Den Uyl and Douglas B. Rasmussen," The Myth of Atomism,". Review of Metaphysics 59:843-70.score: 180.0
     
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  7. Mary Douglas (1996). Thought Styles: Critical Essays on Good Taste. Sage Publications.score: 60.0
    We know we have thoughts, but are we aware that we have styles of thought? This book, written by one of the most gifted and celebrated social thinkers of our time, is a contribution to understanding the rules of the different styles of thinking. Author Mary Douglas takes us through a range of thought styles from the vulgar to the refined. Throughout this fascinating journey, Thought Styles shows us how the different styles work and how outsiders can learn the (...)
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  8. Heather Douglas (2011). Fraud From the Frontlines: The Importance of Being Nice. [REVIEW] Metascience 20 (3):553-556.score: 60.0
    Fraud from the frontlines: the importance of being nice Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9492-2 Authors Heather Douglas, Department of Philosophy, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, 815 McClung Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996-0480, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  9. Heather Douglas (2009). Science, Policy, and the Value-Free Ideal. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 60.0
    Douglas proposes a new ideal in which values serve an essential function throughout scientific inquiry, but where the role values play is constrained at key points, protecting the integrity and objectivity of science.
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  10. William Scott Douglas (ed.) (1993). Collected Works of Robert Burns. Routledge.score: 60.0
    William Scott Douglas's six volume edition of Burns's work is the most oustanding of all the nineteenth century editions in terms of completeness and scholarship. The first three volumes contain Burn's poetry, and the prose works in the final volumes include some sixty-eight previously unpublished letters or parts of letters.
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  11. Donald G. Douglas (1973). Philosophers on Rhetoric: Traditional and Emerging Views. Skokie, Ill.,National Textbook Co..score: 60.0
    Johnstone, H. W., Jr. Rhetoric and communication in philosophy.--Smith, C. R. and Douglas, D. G. Philosophical principles in the traditional and emerging views of rhetoric.--Wallace, K. R. Bacon's conception of rhetoric.--Thonssen, L. W. Thomas Hobbes's philosophy of speech.--Walter, O. M., Jr. Descartes on reasoning.--Douglas, D. G. Spinoza and the methodology of reflective knowledge in persuasion.--Howell, W. S. John Locke and the new rhetoric.--Doering, J. F. David Hume on oratory.--Douglas, D. G. A neo-Kantian approach to the epistomology of (...)
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  12. Heather Douglas (2004). The Irreducible Complexity of Objectivity. Synthese 138 (3):453 - 473.score: 30.0
    The terms ``objectivity'''' and ``objective'''' are among the mostused yet ill-defined terms in the philosophy of science and epistemology. Common to all thevarious usages is the rhetorical force of ``I endorse this and you should too'''', orto put it more mildly, that one should trust the outcome of the objectivity-producing process.The persuasive endorsement and call to trust provide some conceptual coherenceto objectivity, but the reference to objectivity is hopefully not merely an attemptat persuasive endorsement. What, in addition to epistemological endorsement,does (...)
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  13. Heather Douglas (2000). Inductive Risk and Values in Science. Philosophy of Science 67 (4):559-579.score: 30.0
    Although epistemic values have become widely accepted as part of scientific reasoning, non-epistemic values have been largely relegated to the "external" parts of science (the selection of hypotheses, restrictions on methodologies, and the use of scientific technologies). I argue that because of inductive risk, or the risk of error, non-epistemic values are required in science wherever non-epistemic consequences of error should be considered. I use examples from dioxin studies to illustrate how non-epistemic consequences of error can and should be considered (...)
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  14. Heather Douglas, Norms for Values in Scientific Belief Acceptance.score: 30.0
    Although a strict dichotomy between facts and values is no longer accepted, less attention has been paid to the roles values should play in our acceptance of factual statements, or scientific descriptive claims. This paper argues that values, whether cognitive or ethical, should never preclude or direct belief on their own. Our wanting something to be true will not make it so. Instead, values should only be used to consider whether the available evidence provides sufficient warrant for a claim. This (...)
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  15. Thomas Douglas (2008). Moral Enhancement. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):228-245.score: 30.0
    Opponents of biomedical enhancement often claim that, even if such enhancement would benefit the enhanced, it would harm others. But this objection looks unpersuasive when the enhancement in question is a moral enhancement — an enhancement that will expectably leave the enhanced person with morally better motives than she had previously. In this article I (1) describe one type of psychological alteration that would plausibly qualify as a moral enhancement, (2) argue that we will, in the medium-term future, probably be (...)
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  16. Mark Douglas (2000). Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Hype Over Hypernorms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (2):101 - 110.score: 30.0
    Applying social contract theory to business ethics is a relatively new idea, and perhaps nobody has pursued this direction better than Thomas Donaldson and Thomas W. Dunfee. Their "Integrative Social Contracts Theory" manages to combine culturally sensitive decision making capacities with trans-cultural norms by setting up a layered system of social contracts. Lurking behind their work is a concern with the problems of relativism. They hope to alleviate these problems by introducing three concepts important to the ISCT: "authentic norms," which (...)
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  17. Heather Douglas (2004). Prediction, Explanation, and Dioxin Biochemistry: Science in Public Policy. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):49-63.score: 30.0
  18. Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny (2008). Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia. Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.score: 30.0
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. In this (...)
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  19. G. Douglas (1998). Why Pains Are Not Mental Objects. Philosophical Studies 91 (2):127-148.score: 30.0
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  20. Patricia Casey Douglas, Ronald A. Davidson & Bill N. Schwartz (2001). The Effect of Organizational Culture and Ethical Orientation on Accountants' Ethical Judgments. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (2):101 - 121.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the relationship between organizational ethical culture in two large international CPA firms, auditors'' personal values and the ethical orientation that those values dictate, and judgments in ethical dilemmas typical of those that accountants face. Using an experimental task consisting of multiple judgments designed to vary in "moral intensity" (Jones, 1991), and unique as well as tried-and-true approaches to variable measurements, this study examined the judgments of more than three hundred participants in our study. ANCOVA and path analysis (...)
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  21. Patricia Casey Douglas & Benson Wier (2005). Cultural and Ethical Effects in Budgeting Systems: A Comparison of U.S. And Chinese Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (2):159 - 174.score: 30.0
    This study developed and tested a model of culture’s effect on budgeting systems, and hypothesized that system variables and reactions to them are influenced by culture-specific work-related and ethical values. Most organizational and behavioral views of budgeting fail to acknowledge the ethical components of the problem, and have largely ignored the role of culture in shaping organizational and individual values. Cross-cultural differences in reactions to system design variables, and in the behaviors motivated or mitigated by those variables, has implications for (...)
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  22. Roy R. Reeves, Sharon P. Douglas, Rosa T. Garner, Marti D. Reynolds & Anita Silvers (2007). The Individual Rights of the Difficult Patient. Hastings Center Report 37 (2):13-15.score: 30.0
  23. Mary Douglas (1995). The Gender of the Beloved. Heythrop Journal 36 (4):397–408.score: 30.0
  24. Louis W. Hodges, Mark Douglas, Rick Kenney, Christine Dellert & Arthur L. Caplan (2006). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2 & 3):215 – 228.score: 30.0
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  25. S. F., E. F. Stevenson, B. Russell, G. E. Moore, Charles Douglas, Henry Sturt, G. Dawes Hicks & C. A. F. Rhys-Davids (1898). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 7 (28):557-580.score: 30.0
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  26. Patricia Casey Douglas & Benson Wier (2000). Integrating Ethical Dimensions Into a Model of Budgetary Slack Creation. Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):267 - 277.score: 30.0
    The "Ibercorp affair" was front-page news in Spain at various times between 1992 and 1995. In itself, there was nothing particularly new about it: a newly formed financial group engaged in legally and ethically reprehensible behaviour that eventually came to light in the media, ruining the company (and the careers of those involved). What aroused public interest at the time was the fact that it involved individuals connected with Spanish public and political life, the media and certain business circles. Above (...)
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  27. Paul H. Douglas (1923). The Necessity for Proportional Representation. International Journal of Ethics 34 (1):6-26.score: 30.0
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  28. George H. Douglas (1970). A Reconsideration of the Dewey-Croce Exchange. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):497-504.score: 30.0
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  29. Jean Woodall & Danielle Douglas (1999). Ethical Issues in Contemporary Human Resource Development. Business Ethics 8 (4):249–261.score: 30.0
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  30. Danielle Douglas (1996). The Ethics of Managing People. Business Ethics 5 (3):139–142.score: 30.0
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  31. Peter Erlandson (2005). The Body Disciplined: Rewriting Teaching Competence and the Doctrine of Reflection. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):661–670.score: 30.0
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  32. W. R. Sorley, Margaret Washburn, W. B. Pillsbury, Hubert M. Foston, Charles Douglas, Alexander F. Shand, B. A. W. Russell, James Lindsay & W. R. Scott (1896). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 5 (17):119-133.score: 30.0
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  33. Paul H. Douglas (1935). Is a General Program of Social Insurance Desirable? International Journal of Ethics 45 (3):317-336.score: 30.0
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  34. Edward E. Smith & L. Douglas (1981). Categories and Concepts. Harvard University Press.score: 30.0
  35. Kimberley Brownlee (2008). Justifying Punishment: A Response to Douglas Husak. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):123-129.score: 24.0
    In ‘Why Criminal Law: A Question of Content?’, Douglas Husak argues that an analysis of the justifiability of the criminal law depends upon an analysis of the justifiability of state punishment. According to Husak, an adequate justification of state punishment both must show why the state is permitted to infringe valuable rights such as the right not to be punished and must respond to two distinct groups of persons who may demand a justification for the imposition of punishment, namely, (...)
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  36. Douglas Walton (2007). A Bibliography of Douglas Walton's Published Works, 1971-2007. Informal Logic 27 (1):135-147.score: 21.0
    A Bibliography of Douglas Walton’s Published Works, 1971-20.
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  37. Gabriel Andrade (2004). Metáforas No Verbales: En Torna a Mary Douglas y Claude Lévi-Strauss. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (25):99-120.score: 21.0
    This ar ti cle ex tends, from a philo soph i cal and an thro po log i cal point of view, the re cent dis - cus sions as to what is met a phoric. Lan guage phi - los o phers have con trib uted to the un der stand ing of the na ture and func tion of met a phors, but their com ments have been tra ..
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  38. Tuomas E. Tahko (2013). Tropes: Properties, Objects, and Mental Causation. By Douglas Ehring. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):379-382.score: 18.0
    Book review of 'Tropes: Properties, Objects, and Mental Causation' (2011, OUP). By DOUGLAS EHRING.
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  39. Jay L. Garfield & Jan Westerhoff (2011). Acquiring the Notion of a Dependent Designation: A Response to Douglas L. Berger. Philosophy East and West 61 (2):365-367.score: 18.0
    In a recent issue of Philosophy East and West Douglas Berger defends a new reading of Mūlamadhyamakakārikā XXIV : 18, arguing that most contemporary translators mistranslate the important term prajñaptir upādāya, misreading it as a compound indicating "dependent designation" or something of the sort, instead of taking it simply to mean "this notion, once acquired." He attributes this alleged error, pervasive in modern scholarship, to Candrakīrti, who, Berger correctly notes, argues for the interpretation he rejects.Berger's analysis, and the reading (...)
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  40. Douglas V. Porpora (1989). Four Concepts of Social Structure Douglas V. Porpora. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (2):195–211.score: 18.0
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  41. Berit Brogaard, Inconsistency Theories of Semantic Paradox, by Douglas Patterson. Philosopher's Digest.score: 18.0
    Douglas Patterson argues that the best way to respond to the semantic paradoxes that arise in natural language is to take natural language semantics to be (explosively) inconsistent. According to Patterson, to understand a natural language is to share with others cognition of a false semantic theory. Patterson’s main argument runs as follows. English is expressively rich. So, the first sentence occurring in this review could be.
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  42. Douglas Birkhead (1997). Book Review: The Role of Emotions in Moral Decisions: A Book Review by Douglas Birkhead. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):57 – 59.score: 18.0
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  43. Andrew Botterell (2013). Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.score: 18.0
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
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  44. A. D. Block & S. E. Cuypers (2012). Why Darwinians Should Not Be Afraid of Mary Douglas--And Vice Versa: The Case of Disgust. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (4):459-488.score: 18.0
    Evolutionary psychology and human sociobiology often reject the mere possibility of symbolic causality. Conversely, theories in which symbolic causality plays a central role tend to be both anti-nativist and anti-evolutionary. This article sketches how these apparent scientific rivals can be reconciled in the study of disgust. First, we argue that there are no good philosophical or evolutionary reasons to assume that symbolic causality is impossible. Then, we examine to what extent symbolic causality can be part of the theoretical toolbox of (...)
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  45. Gigi Berardi (2012). Douglas Harper and Patrizia Faccioli: The Italian Way: Food & Social Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):929-932.score: 18.0
    Douglas Harper and Patrizia Faccioli: The Italian Way: Food & Social Life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s10806-012-9379-x Authors Gigi Berardi, Department of Environmental Studies, Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  46. Douglas Kellner, By Douglas Kellner (Http://Www.Gseis.Ucla.Edu/Faculty/Kellner/).score: 18.0
    During the Gulf war, CNN correspondent Peter Arnett distinguished himself with its courageous reporting in Iraq while under fire by the U.S.-led coalition which dropped more bombs on Iraq than were unleashed in World War II. Reporting live from Baghdad throughout the war, Arnett provided vivid daily accounts of life in Iraq during one of the most sustained air attacks in history. From his live telephone reporting of the early hours of the U.S. attack on Iraq in January 1991 through (...)
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  47. Douglas W. Hands (1979). Review Symposium : Douglas W. Hands G. C. Archibald Joseph Agassi on S. J. Latsis, Ed. Method and Appraisal in Economics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976. Pp. VIII + 218. $17.50 the Methodology of Economic Research Programmes. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (3):293-303.score: 18.0
  48. Michael Magee (2007). Review: Philosophy Americana: Making Philosophy at Home in American Culture by Douglas R. Anderson. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (2):411-417.score: 18.0
    Douglas R. Anderson's Philosophy Americana reads like a series of rescue attempts: an attempt to rescue academic teaching from institutional and bureaucratic logic; to rescue philosophers such as Bugbee and Royce from their pragmatist critics; to rescue the pragmatists themselves from their would-be champions among the postmodernists; to (in a related move) save Emerson from Cavell; to save country music from the charge that it is either politically retrograde or an experiential dead-end; and to save Kerouac and the Beats (...)
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  49. Jacob Nebel, Ryan W. Davis, Peter van Elswyk & Ben Holguin (2013). Teaching Philosophy Through Lincoln-Douglas Debate. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289.score: 18.0
    This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are not inevitable, and we (...)
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  50. R. L. Pierce (2012). Whose Ethics of Knowledge? Taking the Next Step in Evaluating Knowledge in Synthetic Biology: A Response to Douglas and Savulescu. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):636-638.score: 18.0
    The recent proposal by Douglas and Savulescu for an ethics of knowledge provokes a renewed consideration of an enduring issue. Yet, the concept raises significant challenges for procedural and substantive justice. Indeed, the operationalisation of ‘an ethics of knowledge’ could be as alarming as what it seeks to prevent. While we can acknowledge that there is, and surely always will be, potential for misuse of beneficial science and technology, a contemplated conception of what we ought to not know, devise (...)
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