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  1. Douglas K. Martin (forthcoming). Abortion and Fetal Tissue Transplantation. Irb.
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  2. Douglas K. Martin, Eric M. Meslin, Nitsa Kohut & Peter A. Singer (forthcoming). The Incommensurability of Research Risks and Benefits: Practical Help for Research Ethics Committees. Irb.
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  3. Lydia Kapiriri & Douglas K. Martin (2010). Successful Priority Setting in Low and Middle Income Countries: A Framework for Evaluation. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (2):129-147.
    Priority setting remains a big challenge for health managers and planners, yet there is paucity of literature on evaluating priority setting. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for evaluating priority setting in low and middle income countries. We conducted a qualitative study involving a review of literature and Delphi interviews with respondents knowledgeable of priority setting in low and middle income countries. Respondents were asked to identify the measures of successful priority setting in low and middle (...)
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  4. Douglas K. Martin, Heather L. Greenwood & Jeff Nisker (2010). Public Perceptions of Ethical Issues Regarding Adult Predictive Genetic Testing. Health Care Analysis 18 (2):103-112.
    The purpose of this study was to explore the views of members of the general public regarding ethical issues in adult predictive genetic testing. The literature pertaining to ethical issues regarding to adult predictive genetic testing is largely restricted to the views of ‘experts’ who have emphasized informed consent, patent issues, and insurance discrimination. Occasionally the views of patients who have undergone genetic counselling and testing have been elicited, adding psychosocial and family issues. However, the general public has not had (...)
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  5. Lydia Kapiriri & Douglas K. Martin (2007). A Strategy to Improve Priority Setting in Developing Countries. Health Care Analysis 15 (3):159-167.
    Because the demand for health services outstrips the available resources, priority setting is one of the most difficult issues faced by health policy makers, particularly those in developing countries. Priority setting in developing countries is fraught with uncertainty due to lack of credible information, weak priority setting institutions, and unclear priority setting processes. Efforts to improve priority setting in these contexts have focused on providing information and tools. In this paper we argue that priority setting is a value laden and (...)
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  6. Douglas K. Martin (2007). Making Hard Choices. The Key to Health System Sustainability. Practical Bioethics 3 (1):1-8.
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  7. David D'Souza, Douglas K. Martin, Laura Purdy, Andrea Bezjak & Peter A. Singer (2001). Waiting Lists for Radiation Therapy: A Case Study. BMC Health Services Research 1:1-3.
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  8. Kerry W. Bowman, Douglas K. Martin & Peter A. Singer (2000). Quality End‐of‐Life Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (1):51-61.
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  9. Peter Singer, Douglas K. Martin, Mita Giacomini & Laura Purdy (2000). Priority Setting for New Technologies in Medicine: A Qualitative Study. British Medical Journal 321:1316-1318.
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  10. Peter J. Aikman, Elaine C. Thiel, Douglas K. Martin & Peter A. Singer (1999). Proxy, Health, and Personal Care Preferences: Implications for End-of-Life Care. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):200-210.
    The Institute of Medicine's report, the American Medical Association's project, the Open Society Institute's and the initiative sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have focused attention on improving the care of dying patients. These efforts include advance care planning and the use of written advance directives (ADs). Although previous studies have provided quantitative descriptions of patient preferences for life-sustaining treatment, including those documented in written ADs, to our knowledge open-ended written preferences have not been studied. Studies of these open-ended (...)
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