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Douglas M. Jesseph [16]Douglas Michael Jesseph [6]
  1.  9
    Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. University of Chicago Press.
    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work.
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  2.  6
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), Philosophical Review. Cambridge University Press 126-128.
    The dissertation is a detailed analysis of Berkeley's writings on mathematics, concentrating on the link between his attack on the theory of abstract ideas and his philosophy of mathematics. Although the focus is on Berkeley's works, I also trace the important connections between Berkeley's views and those of Isaac Barrow, John Wallis, John Keill, and Isaac Newton . The basic thesis I defend is that Berkeley's philosophy of mathematics is a natural extension of his views on abstraction. The first chapter (...)
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  3. Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley, God, and Explanation. In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press
    This paper analyzes Berkeley's arguments for the existence of God in the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues, and Alciphron. Where most scholarship has interpreted Berkeley as offering three quite distinct attempted proofs of God's existence, I argue that these are all variations on the strategy of inference to the best explanation. I also consider how this reading of Berkeley connects his conception of God to his views about causation and explanation.
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  4.  12
    Douglas Michael Jesseph (1992). Berkeley's Revolution in Vision. Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (2):306-307.
  5.  53
    Douglas Michael Jesseph (2004). Galileo, Hobbes, and the Book of Nature. Perspectives on Science 12 (2):191-211.
    : This paper investigates the influence of Galileo's natural philosophy on the philosophical and methodological doctrines of Thomas Hobbes. In particular, I argue that what Hobbes took away from his encounter with Galileo was the fundamental idea that the world is a mechanical system in which everything can be understood in terms of mathematically-specifiable laws of motion. After tracing the history of Hobbes's encounters with Galilean science (through the "Welbeck group" connected with William Cavendish, earl of Newcastle and the "Mersenne (...)
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  6.  34
    Douglas Michael Jesseph (1998). Leibniz on the Foundations of the Calculus: The Question of the Reality of Infinitesimal Magnitudes. Perspectives on Science 6 (1):6-40.
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  7.  43
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2002). Hobbes's Atheism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):(2002), 140–166.
  8. George Berkeley & Douglas Michael Jesseph (1992). De Motu ; and, the Analyst.
     
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  9.  31
    Douglas Michael Jesseph (2007). Descartes, Pascal, and the Epistemology of Mathematics: The Case of the Cycloid. Perspectives on Science 15 (4):410-433.
    This paper deals with the very different attitudes that Descartes and Pascal had to the cycloid—the curve traced by the motion of a point on the periphery of a circle as the circle rolls across a right line. Descartes insisted that such a curve was merely mechanical and not truly geometric, and so was of no real mathematical interest. He nevertheless responded to enquiries from Mersenne, who posed the problems of determining its area and constructing its tangent. Pascal, in contrast, (...)
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  10.  9
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2013). Logic and Demonstrative Knowledge. In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press 373--90.
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  11.  24
    Douglas M. Jesseph (1989). Philosophical Theory and Mathematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):215-244.
    It is argued that, contrary to the standard accounts of the development of infinitesimal mathematics, the leading mathematicians of the seventeenth century were deeply concerned with the rigor of their methods. examples are taken from the work of cavalieri and leibniz, with further material drawn from guldin, barrow, and wallis.
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  12.  4
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2011). Stephen Gaukroger.The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1210–1685. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 572. $85.00 ; $45.00 .Stephen Gaukroger.The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680–1760. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 464. $65.00. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):317-328.
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  13. Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Hobbes and Mathematical Method. Perspectives on Science 1 (1993):306-341.
  14.  1
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2014). Hobbes, the Scriblerians and the History of Philosophy by Conal Condren. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):614-615.
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  15.  14
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2009). Review of Gerhard Preyer, Georg Peter (Eds.), Philosophy of Mathematics: Set Theory, Measuring Theories, and Nominalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  16.  9
    Douglas M. Jesseph (1999). The Decline and Fall of Hobbesian Geometry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 30 (3):425-453.
  17. Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas M. Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek (2003). Historical Dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
    This is a dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian philosophy, primarily covering philosophy in the 17th century, with a chronology and biography of Descartes's life and times and a bibliography of primary and secondary works related to Descartes and to Cartesians.
     
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  18. Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas M. Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek (2015). Historical Dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This second edition of Historical Dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy covers the history through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 300 cross-referenced entries on various concepts in Descartes’ philosophy, science, and mathematics, as well as biographical entries about the intellectual setting for Descartes’ philosophy and its reception, both with Cartesians and anti-Cartesians. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Descartes.
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  19. Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas M. Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek (2010). The a to Z of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
    The A to Z of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy includes a chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and cross-reference dictionary entries Descartes's writings, concepts, and findings, as well as entries on those who supported him, those who criticized him, those who corrected him, and those who together formed one of the major movements in philosophy, Cartesianism.
     
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  20. Douglas M. Jesseph (ed.) (2015). G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Netherlands.
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  21. Douglas M. Jesseph (2015). Leibniz on The Elimination of Infinitesimals. In David Rabouin, Philip Beeley & Norma B. Goethe (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Netherlands
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  22. Douglas Michael Jesseph (1999). Squaring the Circle the War Between Hobbes and Wallis. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).