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Douglas M. Jesseph [11]Douglas Michael Jesseph [4]
  1. Douglas M. Jesseph (2013). Logic and Demonstrative Knowledge. In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. 373--90.
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  2. Douglas M. Jesseph (2011). Stephen Gaukroger . The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1210–1685 . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 572. $85.00 (Cloth); $45.00 (Paper). Stephen Gaukroger . The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680–1760 . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 464. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):317-328.
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  3. Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas M. Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek (2010). The a to Z of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
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  4. Douglas M. Jesseph (2009). Review of Gerhard Preyer, Georg Peter (Eds.), Philosophy of Mathematics: Set Theory, Measuring Theories, and Nominalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  5. Douglas Michael Jesseph (2007). Descartes, Pascal, and the Epistemology of Mathematics: The Case of the Cycloid. Perspectives on Science 15 (4):410-433.
  6. Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley, God, and Explanation. In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    This paper analyzes Berkeley's arguments for the existence of God in the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues, and Alciphron. Where most scholarship has interpreted Berkeley as offering three quite distinct attempted proofs of God's existence, I argue that these are all variations on the strategy of inference to the best explanation. I also consider how this reading of Berkeley connects his conception of God to his views about causation and explanation.
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  7. Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press.
  8. Douglas Michael Jesseph (2004). Galileo, Hobbes, and the Book of Nature. Perspectives on Science 12 (2):191-211.
    : This paper investigates the influence of Galileo's natural philosophy on the philosophical and methodological doctrines of Thomas Hobbes. In particular, I argue that what Hobbes took away from his encounter with Galileo was the fundamental idea that the world is a mechanical system in which everything can be understood in terms of mathematically-specifiable laws of motion. After tracing the history of Hobbes's encounters with Galilean science (through the "Welbeck group" connected with William Cavendish, earl of Newcastle and the "Mersenne (...)
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  9. Douglas M. Jesseph (2002). Hobbes's Atheism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):(2002), 140–166.
  10. Douglas M. Jesseph (1999). The Decline and Fall of Hobbesian Geometry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 30 (3):425-453.
  11. Douglas Michael Jesseph (1998). Leibniz on the Foundations of the Calculus: The Question of the Reality of Infinitesimal Magnitudes. Perspectives on Science 6 (1):6-40.
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  12. Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. University of Chicago Press.
    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work.
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  13. Douglas M. Jesseph (1993). Hobbes and Mathematical Method. Perspectives on Science 1 (1993):306-341.
  14. Douglas Michael Jesseph (1992). Berkeley's Revolution in Vision (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (2):306-307.
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  15. Douglas M. Jesseph (1989). Philosophical Theory and Mathematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):215-244.
    It is argued that, contrary to the standard accounts of the development of infinitesimal mathematics, the leading mathematicians of the seventeenth century were deeply concerned with the rigor of their methods. examples are taken from the work of cavalieri and leibniz, with further material drawn from guldin, barrow, and wallis.
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