Search results for 'Dream' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andy Clark (2005). The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation, or Hybrid? In C. Grau (ed.), Philosophical Essays on the Matrix. Oxford University Press New York.score: 24.0
    “The Matrix is a computer-generated dreamworld built to keep us under control” Morpheus, early in The Matrix. “ In dreaming, you are not only out of control, you don’t even know it…I was completely duped again and again the minute my pons, my amygdala, my perihippocampal cortex, my anterior cingulate, my visual association and parietal opercular cortices were revved up and my dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was muffled” ” J. Allan Hobson, The Dream Drugstore, p.64 The Matrix is an exercise (...)
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  2. Xiaoqiang Han (2010). A Butterfly Dream in a Brain in a Vat. Philosophia 38 (1):157-167.score: 24.0
    Zhuangzi’s Butterfly Dream story can be read as a skeptical response to the Cartesian Cogito, ergo sum solution, for it presents I exist as fundamentally unprovable, on the grounds that the notion about “I” that it is guaranteed to refer to something existing, which Descartes seems to assume, is unwarranted. The modern anti-skepticism of Hilary Putnam employs a different strategy, which seeks to derive the existence of the world not from some “indubitable” truth such as the existence of myself (...)
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  3. Richard A. Hilbert (2010). The Anomalous Foundations of Dream Telling: Objective Solipsism and the Problem of Meaning. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (1):41-64.score: 24.0
    Little sociological attention is directed to dreams and dreaming, and none at all is directed to how people tell one another about dreams. Ordinary settings in which dreams are told mimic the conditions of “breaching” experiments and should produce anomie, but dream telling proceeds without trouble. Foundational orientations of ordinary dream talk assimilate into professional dream studies, where dream narratives are “data” and the analysis of narratives is “dream analysis.” That such practices proceed without trouble (...)
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  4. [deleted]Jennifer M. Windt (2013). Reporting Dream Experience: Why (Not) to Be Skeptical About Dream Reports. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Are dreams subjective experiences during sleep? Is it like something to dream, or is it only like something to remember dreams after awakening? Specifically, can dream reports be trusted to reveal what it is like to dream, and should they count as evidence for saying that dreams are conscious experiences at all? The goal of this article is to investigate the relationship between dreaming, dream reporting and subjective experience during sleep. I discuss different variants of philosophical (...)
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  5. [deleted]Sérgio Arthuro Mota-Rolim, Zé Henrique Targino, Bryan C. Souza, Wilfredo Blanco, John F. Araujo & Sidarta Ribeiro (2013). Dream Characteristics in a Brazilian Sample: An Online Survey Focusing on Lucid Dreaming. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD), subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n=3,427; median age=25 years) through an (...)
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  6. Jennifer Michelle Windt & Thomas Metzinger (2007). The Philosophy of Dreaming and Self-Consciousness: What Happens to the Experiential Subject During the Dream State? In Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. 193-247.score: 22.0
  7. Nathan Ballantyne & Ian Evans (2010). Sosa's Dream. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):249 - 252.score: 21.0
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  8. Jim Hopkins (1999). Patterns of Interpretation: Speech, Action, and Dream. In L. Marcus (ed.), Cultural Documents: The Interpretation of Dream. Manchester University Press.score: 21.0
    Freud's account of dreams can be understood via interpretive patterns that span language and action, enabling an extension of common sense psychology that is potentially cogent, cumulative, and radical.
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  9. Gareth B. Matthews (1981). On Being Immoral in a Dream. Philosophy 56 (January):47-64.score: 21.0
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  10. J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.score: 21.0
  11. Gayle Porter (2010). Work Ethic and Ethical Work: Distortions in the American Dream. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (4):535 - 550.score: 21.0
    Economic progress in the United States has been attributed to the successful combination of two social structures — capitalism as an economic system and democracy as a political system. At the heart of this interaction is a particular work ethic in which hard work is considered the path to both immediate and future rewards. This article examines the evolution of work ethic in the United States, as well as the returns experienced through various adaptations in the country's history. From this (...)
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  12. Mehmet Karabela (2013). The Dream in Islam: From Qur'anic Tradition to Jihadist Inspiration. [REVIEW] Political Studies Review 11 (2):232-233.score: 21.0
  13. Jean Hering (1947). Concerning Image, Idea, and Dream (Translation). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 8 (December):188-205.score: 21.0
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  14. Roger Squires (1995). Dream Time. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:83-91.score: 21.0
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  15. Ruth Weintraub (2006). What Descartes' Demon Can Do and His Dream Cannot. Theoria 72 (4):319-335.score: 21.0
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  16. Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.score: 21.0
  17. William Dement & Edward A. Wolpert (1958). The Relation of Eye Movements, Body Motility, and External Stimuli to Dream Content. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):543.score: 21.0
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  18. Antti Revonsuo & K. Tarkko (2002). Binding in Dreams: The Bizarreness of Dream Images and the Unity of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (7):3-24.score: 21.0
  19. William Dement & Nathaniel Kleitman (1957). The Relation of Eye Movements During Sleep to Dream Activity: An Objective Method for the Study of Dreaming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (5):339.score: 21.0
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  20. Robert E. Haskell (1986). Cognitive Psychology and Dream Research: Historical, Conceptual, and Epistemological Considerations. Journal of Mind and Behavior 7:131-159.score: 21.0
     
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  21. Arvind Sharma (2006). The World as Dream. D. K. Printworld.score: 21.0
     
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  22. Jung H. Lee (2007). What is It Like to Be a Butterfly? A Philosophical Interpretation of Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):185 – 202.score: 20.0
    This paper attempts to recast Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream within the larger normative context of the 'Inner Chapters' and early Daoism in terms of its moral significance, particularly in the way that it prescribes how a Daoist should live through the 'significant symbol' of the butterfly. This normative reading of the passage will be contrasted with two recent interpretations of the passage - one by Robert Allinson and the other by Harold Roth - that tend to focus more on the (...)
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  23. Perrine Marie Ruby, Camille Blochet, Jean-Baptiste Eichenlaub, Olivier Bertrand, Dominique Morlet & Aurélie Bidet-Caulet (2013). Alpha Reactivity to First Names Differs in Subjects with High and Low Dream Recall Frequency. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 20.0
    Studies in cognitive psychology showed that personality (openness to experience, thin boundaries, absorption), creativity, nocturnal awakenings, and attitude toward dreams are significantly related to dream recall frequency (DRF). These results suggest the possibility of neurophysiological trait differences between subjects with high and low DRF. To test this hypothesis we compared sleep characteristics and alpha reactivity to sounds in subjects with high and low DRF using polysomnographic recordings and electroencephalography (EEG). We acquired EEG from 21 channels in 36 healthy subjects (...)
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  24. Kristoffer Ahlstrom (2011). Dream Skepticism and the Conditionality Problem. Erkenntnis 75 (1):45-60.score: 18.0
    Recently, Ernest Sosa (2007) has proposed two novel solutions to the problem of dream skepticism. In the present paper, I argue that Sosa’s first solution falls prey to what I will refer to as the conditionality problem, i.e., the problem of only establishing a conditional—in this case, if x, then I am awake, x being a placeholder for a condition incompatible with dreaming—in a context where it also needs to be established that we can know that the antecedent holds, (...)
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  25. Antti Revonsuo (2000). Did Ancestral Humans Dream for Their Lives? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1063-1082.score: 18.0
    The most challenging objections to the Threat Simulation Theory (TST) of the function of dreaming include such issues as whether the competing Random Activation Theory can explain dreaming, whether TST can accommodate the apparently dysfunctional nature of post-traumatic nightmares, whether dreams are too bizarre and disorganized to constitute proper simulations, and whether dream recall is too biased to reveal the true nature of dreams. I show how these and many other objections can be accommodated by TST, and how several (...)
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  26. J. Allan Hobson (2000). The Ghost of Sigmund Freud Haunts Mark Solms's Dream Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):951-952.score: 18.0
    Recent neuropsychological data indicating that an absence of dreaming follows lesions of frontal subcortical white matter have been interpreted by Solms as supportive of Freud's wish-fulfillment, disguise-censorship dream theory. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to Solms's commitment to Freud and to challenge and contrast his specific arguments with the simpler and more complete tenets of the activation-synthesis hypothesis. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  27. Xiaoqiang Han (2009). Interpreting the Butterfly Dream. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):1 – 9.score: 18.0
    This paper follows the tradition of treating Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream episode as presenting a version of skepticism. However, unlike the prevalent interpretations within that tradition, it attempts to show that the skepticism conveyed in the episode is more radical than it has been conceived, such that the episode can be read as a skeptical response to Descartes' refutation of skepticism based on the _Cogito, ergo sum_ proof. The paper explains how the lack of commitment in Zhuangzi to the dubious (...)
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  28. Julia Driver (2007). Dream Immorality. Philosophy 82 (1):5-22.score: 18.0
    This paper focuses on an underappreciated issue that dreams raise for moral evaluation: is immorality possible in dreams? The evaluatiotial internalist is committed to answering ‘yes.’ This is because the internalist account of moral evaluation holds that the moral quality of a person's actions, what a person does, her agency in any given case is completely determined by factors that are internal to that agency, such as the person's motives and/or intentions. Actual production of either good or bad effects is (...)
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  29. Miguel Ángel Sebastián (2013). Not a HOT Dream. In Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.score: 18.0
    Higher-Order Thought (HOT) theories of consciousness maintain that the kind of awareness necessary for phenomenal consciousness depends on the cognitive accessibility that underlies reporting. -/- There is empirical evidence strongly suggesting that the cognitive accessibility that underlies the ability to report visual experiences depends on the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). This area, however, is highly deactivated during the conscious experiences we have during sleep: dreams. HOT theories are jeopardized, as I will argue. I will briefly present HOT (...)
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  30. Angela N. H. Creager (1996). Wendell Stanley's Dream of a Free-Standing Biochemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):331 - 360.score: 18.0
    Scientists and historians have often presumed that the divide between biochemistry and molecular biology is fundamentally epistemological.100 The historiography of molecular biology as promulgated by Max Delbrück's phage disciples similarly emphasizes inherent differences between the archaic tradition of biochemistry and the approach of phage geneticists, the ur molecular biologists. A historical analysis of the development of both disciplines at Berkeley mitigates against accepting predestined differences, and underscores the similarities between the postwar development of biochemistry and the emergence of molecular biology (...)
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  31. Anne Germain, Tore A. Nielsen, Antonio Zadra & Jacques Montplaisir (2000). The Prevalence of Typical Dream Themes Challenges the Specificity of the Threat Simulation Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):940-941.score: 18.0
    The evolutionary theory of threat simulation during dreaming indicates that themes appropriate to ancestral survival concerns (threats) should be disproportionately represented in dreams. Our studies of typical dream themes in students and sleep-disordered patients indicate that threatening dreams involving chase and pursuit are indeed among the three most prevalent themes, thus supporting Revonsuo's theory. However, many of the most prevalent themes are of positive, not negative, events (e.g., sex, flying) and of current, not ancestral, threat scenarios (e.g., schoolwork). Moreover, (...)
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  32. Hans-Georg Möller (1999). Zhuangzi's "Dream of the Butterfly": A Daoist Interpretation. Philosophy East and West 49 (4):439-450.score: 18.0
    Guo Xiang's (252-312) reading of the famous "Butterfly Dream" passage from the Zhuangzi differs significantly from modern readings, particularly those that follow the Giles translation. Guo Xiang's view is based on the assumption that the character of Zhuang Zhou has no recollection of his dream after awakening and therefore does not entertain doubts about what or who he really is. This leads to a specific understanding of the allegorical and philosophical meaning of the text that stands in contradistinction (...)
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  33. Elizabeth Loftus, Dream Interpretation and False Beliefs.score: 18.0
    Dream interpretation is a common practice in psychotherapy. In the research presented in this article, each participant saw a clinician who interpreted a recent dream report to be a sign that the participant had had a mildly traumatic experience before age 3 years, such as being lost for an extended time or feeling abandoned by his or her parents. This dream intervention caused a majority of participants to become more confident that they had had such an experience, (...)
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  34. Michael Schredl (2000). Dream Research: Integration of Physiological and Psychological Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1001-1003.score: 18.0
    All five target articles are of high quality and very stimulating for the field. Several factors such as dream report length and NREM/REM differences, may be affected by the waking process (transition from sleep to wakefulness) and the recall process. It is helpful to distinguish between a model for REM sleep regulation and a physiological model for dreaming. A third model accounting for cognitive activity (thought-like dreaming) can also be of value. The postulated adaptive function of dreaming in avoidance (...)
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  35. Glenn R. Morrow (1970). Plato and the Mathematicians: An Interpretation of Socrates' Dream in the Theaetetus (201e-206c). Philosophical Review 79 (3):309-333.score: 18.0
    Socrates' dream puts in generalized form the difficulty that plato saw in the mathematician's procedure of hypothesis, I.E., Of positing undemonstrated first principles ("prota") or elements ("stoicheia") as starting-Points of demonstration. If the elements are unknown, How can what is constructed from them be known?--A difficulty to which plato had earlier called attention in the 'republic' (510cd, 533cd.) this interpretation accords with the mathematical setting and personages of the dialogue, And explains why the explicit refutation of theaetetus' third proposal, (...)
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  36. Jaak Panksepp (2000). “The Dream of Reason Creates Monsters” . . . Especially When We Neglect the Role of Emotions in Rem-States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):988-990.score: 18.0
    As highlighted by Solms, and to a lesser extent by Hobson et al. and Nielsen, dreaming and REM sleep can be dissociated. Meanwhile Vertes & Eastman and Revonsuo provide distinct views on the functions of REM sleep and dreaming. A resolution of such divergent views may clarify the fundamental nature of these processes. As dream commentators have long noted, with Revonsuo taking the lead among the present authors, emotionality is a central and consistent aspect of REM dreams. A deeper (...)
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  37. Tyrus Miller (1996). From City-Dreams to the Dreaming Collective: Walter Benjamin's Political Dream Interpretation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (6):87-111.score: 18.0
    This essay discusses Walter Benjamin's development of 'dream' as a model for understanding 19th- and 20th-century urban culture. Following Bergson and surrealist poetics, Benjamin used 'dream' in the 1920s as an heuristic analogy for investigating child hood memories, kitsch art and literature; during the early 1930s, he also developed it into an historiographic concept for studying 19th- century Parisian culture. Benjamin's interpretative use of the dream cuts across Ricoeur's distinction between the hermeneutics of 'recol lection' and the (...)
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  38. Olga Stuchebrukhov (2007). “Ridiculous” Dream Versus Social Contract: Dostoevskij, Rousseau, and the Problem of Ideal Society. Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):101 - 169.score: 18.0
    Drawing on the Second Discourse and the Social Contract and Notes from Underground and “The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” this essay examines the striking similarities and fundamental differences between Dostoevskij’s and Rousseau’s treatment of the problem of individual vs. society and their notions of ideal social relations. The essay investigates Rousseau’s attempt to absorb morality into politics and “to concretize” Diderot’s universal moral man into citizen. It also suggests that Dostoevskij takes Rousseau’s attempt at concretization a step further (...)
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  39. Jim F. Pagel (2004). Drug Induced Alterations in Dreaming: An Exploration of the Dream Data Terrain Outside Activation-Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):702-707.score: 18.0
    Two meta-analyses of pharmacological research are presented, demonstrating that psychoactive drugs have consistent effects on EEG and sleep outside of their effects on REM sleep, and demonstrating that drugs other than those affecting sleep neurotransmitter systems and REM sleep can also alter reported nightmare occurrence. These data suggest that the neurobiology data terrain outside activation-synthesis may include sleep and dream electrophysiology, cognitive reports of dreaming, effects of alterations in consciousness on dreaming, immunology and host defense, and clinical therapies for (...)
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  40. Zong-qi Cai (2004). The Influence of Nietzsche in Wang Guowei's Essay "on the Dream of the Red Chamber". Philosophy East and West 54 (2):171-193.score: 18.0
    There are numerous traces of Nietzsche's influence in Wang Guowei's "On the Dream of the Red Chamber" even though there is not a single mention of Nietzsche's name in that seminal essay. Nietzschean thought looms large where Wang openly disagrees with or quietly departs from the views of Schopenhauer and, to a lesser extent, those of Kant and Aristotle. His questioning of Schopenhauer's "no-life-ism" harks back to Nietzsche's challenge to Schopenhauer's life-negating ethics. His portrayal of Bao Yu reveals three (...)
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  41. Guangyi Li (2013). "New Year's Dream": A Chinese Anarcho-Cosmopolitan Utopia. Utopian Studies 24 (1):89-104.score: 18.0
    The revolution has not yet succeeded. Comrades, carry on! On February 17, 1904, one month after the Russo-Japanese War broke out in northeastern China (Manchuria), Cai Yuanpei,1 a prominent Chinese intellectual, began to publish his short story “Xinnian meng” (New Year’s dream) in Eshi jingwen (Alarming news about Russia), a daily based in Shanghai.2 In this piece, Cai depicts his dream of a future world where humans ultimately achieve universal freedom and affluence. The contemporary scholar Arif Dirlik praised (...)
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  42. William M. Hawley (2010). A Midsummer Night's Dream : Relating Ethics to Mutuality. The European Legacy 15 (2):159-169.score: 18.0
    Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream shows ethical conflicts to be resolved relationally. Quarreling lovers divide Duke Theseus's Athenian court in advance of his own nuptial celebration, forcing the Duke to decide moral questions based on their ethical consequences. King Oberon's conflicted fairy world meddles in human affairs, adding to the ethical confusion. Athenian workmen vie for roles in a court performance that becomes both a theatrical travesty and a triumph of relational ethics owing to Bottom, the character most within (...)
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  43. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dream Science 2000: A Response to Commentaries on Dreaming and the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1019-1035.score: 18.0
    Definitions of dreaming are not required to map formal features of mental activity onto brain measures. While dreaming occurs during all stages of sleep, intense dreaming is largely confined to REM. Forebrain structures and many neurotransmitters can contribute to sleep and dreaming without negating brainstem and aminergic-cholinergic control mechanisms. Reductionism is essential to science and AIM has considerable heuristic value. Recent findings support sleep's role in learning and memory. Emerging technologies may address long-standing issues in sleep and dream research.
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  44. Tracey L. Kahan (2000). The “Problem” of Dreaming in NREM Sleep Continues to Challenge Reductionist (Two Generator) Models of Dream Generation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):956-958.score: 18.0
    The “problem” of dreaming in NREM sleep continues to challenge models that propose a causal relationship between REM mechanisms and the psychological features of dreaming. I suggest that, ultimately, efforts to identify correspondences among multiple levels of analysis will be more productive for dream theory than attempts to reduce dreaming to any one level of analysis. [Hobson et al. ; Nielsen].
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  45. V. S. Rotenberg (2000). Search Activity: A Key to Resolving Contradictions in Sleep/Dream Investigation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):996-999.score: 18.0
    The target articles on sleep and dreaming are discussed in terms of the concept of search activity integrating different types of behavior, body resistance, REM sleep/dream functions, and the brain catecholamine system. REM sleep may be functionally sufficient or insufficient, depending on the dream scenario, the latter being more important than the physiological manifestation of REM sleep. REM sleep contributes to memory consolidation in the indirect way. [Nielsen; Revonsuo; Solms; Vertes & Eastman].
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  46. Yu Chang (2010). The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu XI's Discussion of “Dreams”—and on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.score: 18.0
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in their own way, while Zhu Xi was perhaps the most outstanding one among them. He made profound explanations of dreams from aspects such as the relationship between dreams and the principles li and qi , the relationship between dreams and the state of the heart, and the relationship (...)
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  47. Mary Sirridge (2005). Dream Bodies and Dream Pains in Augustine's "de Natura Et Origine Animae". Vivarium 43 (2):213-249.score: 18.0
    In his De Natura et Origine Animae, an answer to a work by Vincentius Victor, Augustine was drawn into attempting to answer some questions about what kind of reality dream-bodies, dream-worlds and dream-pains have. In this paper I concentrate on Augustine's attempts to show that none of Victor's arguments for the corporeality of the soul are any good, and that Victor's inflated claims about the extent of the soul's self-knowledge are the result of mistaking self-awareness for self-knowledge. (...)
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  48. Jacques Montangero (2000). A More General Evolutionary Hypothesis About Dream Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):972-973.score: 18.0
    Revonsuo's evolutionary theory of dream function is extremely interesting. However, although threat avoidance theory is well grounded in experimental data, it does not take other significant dream research data into account. The theory can be integrated into a more general hypothesis which takes these data into consideration. [Revonsuo].
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  49. Edward F. Pace-Schott (2005). Complex Hallucinations in Waking Suggest Mechanisms of Dream Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):771-772.score: 18.0
    Waking hallucinations suggest mechanisms of dream initiation and maintenance. Visual association cortex activation, yielding poorly attended-to, visually ambiguous dream environments, suggests conditions favoring hallucinosis. Attentional and visual systems, coactivated during sleep, may generate imagery that is inserted into virtual environments. Internally consistent dreaming may evolve from successive, contextually evoked images. Fluctuating arousal and context-evoked imagery may help explain dream features.
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  50. Michael Schredl (2011). Dream Research in Schizophrenia: Methodological Issues and a Dimensional Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1036-1041.score: 18.0
    Dreaming in patients with schizophrenia was and is of particular interest to researchers and clinicians due to the phenomenological similarities between the dreaming state and schizophrenic daytime symptomatology such as bizarre thoughts or hallucinations. Extensive literature reviews have shown that dream studies in the field of psychopathology often do not fulfill common scientific criteria. The present paper focuses on the methodological issues like sampling methods, the dream collection method, and dream content analysis that are crucial with regard (...)
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