Search results for 'Dreaming' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 793-842.score: 27.0
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  2. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.score: 24.0
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  3. Owen J. Flanagan (2000). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the (...)
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  4. John Sutton (2009). Dreaming. In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    As a topic in the philosophy of psychology, dreaming is a fascinating, diverse, and severely underdeveloped area of study. The topic excites intense public interest in its own right, while also challenging our confidence that we know what the words “conscious” and “consciousness” mean. So dreaming should be at the forefront of our interdisciplinary investigations: theories of mind which fail to address the topic are incomplete. This chapter illustrates the tight links between conceptual and empirical issues by highlighting (...)
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  5. Mark Solms (2000). Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.score: 24.0
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The (...)
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  6. Brian O'Shaughnessy (2002). Dreaming. Inquiry 45 (4):399-432.score: 24.0
    The aim is to discover a principle governing the formation of the dream. Now dreaming has an analogy with consciousness in that it is a seeming-consciousness. Meanwhile consciousness exhibits a tripartite structure consisting of (A) understanding oneself to be situated in a world endowed with given properties, (B) the mental processes responsible for the state, and (C) the concrete perceptual encounter of awareness with the world. The dream analogues of these three elements are investigated in the hope of (...)
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  7. Jennifer M. Windt (2010). The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.score: 24.0
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and (...)
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  8. Lampros Perogamvros, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Martin Desseilles & Sophie Schwartz (2013). Sleep and Dreaming Are for Important Matters. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Recent studies in sleep and dreaming have described an activation of emotional and reward systems, as well as the processing of internal information during these states. Specifically, increased activity in the amygdala and across mesolimbic dopaminergic regions during REM sleep is likely to promote the consolidation of memory traces with high emotional/motivational value. Moreover, coordinated hippocampal-striatal replay during NREM sleep may contribute to the selective strengthening of memories for important events. In this review, we suggest that, via the activation (...)
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  9. Fabian Guénolé, Geoffrey Marcaggi & Jean-Marc Baleyte (2013). Do Dreams Really Guard Sleep? Evidence for and Against Freud's Theory of the Basic Function of Dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Do dreams really guard sleep? Evidence for and against Freud's theory of the basic function of dreaming.
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  10. Erin J. Wamsley (2013). Dreaming, Waking Conscious Experience, and the Resting Brain: Report of Subjective Experience as a Tool in the Cognitive Neurosciences. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Even when we are ostensibly doing “nothing” – as during states of rest, sleep, and reverie – the brain continues to process information. In resting wakefulness, the mind generates thoughts, plans for the future, and imagines fictitious scenarios. In sleep, when the demands of sensory input are reduced, our experience turns to the thoughts and images we call “dreaming”. Far from being a meaningless distraction, the content of these subjective experiences provides an important and unique source of information about (...)
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  11. Armando D'Agostino, Anna Castelnovo & Silvio Scarone (2013). Dreaming and the Neurobiology of Self: Recent Advances and Implications for Psychiatry. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Dreaming and the neurobiology of self: recent advances and implications for psychiatry.
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  12. Sérgio Arthuro Mota-Rolim, Zé Henrique Targino, Bryan C. Souza, Wilfredo Blanco, John F. Araujo & Sidarta Ribeiro (2013). Dream Characteristics in a Brazilian Sample: An Online Survey Focusing on Lucid Dreaming. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD), subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n=3,427; median age=25 (...)
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  13. Martin Dresler, Leandra Eibl, Christian Fj Fischer, Renate Wehrle, Victor I. Spoormaker, Axel Steiger, Michael Czisch & Marcel Pawlowski (2013). Volitional Components of Consciousness Vary Across Wakefulness, Dreaming and Lucid Dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology 4:987.score: 24.0
    Consciousness is a multifaceted concept; its different aspects vary across species, vigilance states or health conditions. While basal aspects of consciousness like perceptions and emotions are present in many states and species, higher-order aspects like reflective or volitional capabilities seem to be most pronounced in awake humans. Here we assess the experience of volition across different states of consciousness: 10 frequent lucid dreamers rated different aspects of volition according to the Volitional Components Questionnaire for phases of normal dreaming, lucid (...)
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  14. Kieran C. Fox, Savannah Nijeboer, Elizaveta Solomonova, G. William Domhoff & Kalina Christoff (2013). Dreaming as Mind Wandering: Evidence From Functional Neuroimaging and First-Person Content Reports. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW) during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both ‘daydreaming’ and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws (...)
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  15. David Kahn (2013). Brain Basis of Self: Self-Organization and Lessons From Dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Through dreaming a different facet of the self is created as a result of a self-organizing process in the brain. Self-organization in biological systems often happens as an answer to an environmental change for which the existing system cannot cope; self-organization creates a system that can cope in the newly changed environment. In dreaming, self-organization serves the function of organizing disparate memories into a dream since the dreamer herself is not able to control how individual memories become weaved (...)
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  16. Kalina Christoff Kieran C. R. Fox, Savannah Nijeboer, Elizaveta Solomonova, G. William Domhoff (2013). Dreaming as Mind Wandering: Evidence From Functional Neuroimaging and First-Person Content Reports. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW) during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both ‘daydreaming’ and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws (...)
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  17. Jennifer Michelle Windt & Thomas Metzinger (2007). The Philosophy of Dreaming and Self-Consciousness: What Happens to the Experiential Subject During the Dream State? In Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. 193-247.score: 24.0
  18. Tracey L. Kahan (2001). Consciousness in Dreaming: A Metacognitive Approach. In Kelly Bulkeley (ed.), Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming. Palgrave. 333-360.score: 24.0
  19. Miloslava Kozmová & Richard N. Wolman (2006). Self-Awareness in Dreaming. Dreaming 16 (3):196-214.score: 24.0
     
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  20. Jim Stone (1984). Dreaming and Certainty. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):353-368.score: 22.0
    I argue that being wide awake is an epistemic virtue which enables me to recognize immediately that I'm wide awake. Also I argue that dreams are imaginings and that the wide awake mind can immediately discern the difference between imaginings and vivid sense experience. Descartes need only pinch himself.
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  21. James D. Marshall (2008). Wittgenstein, Freud, Dreaming and Education: Psychoanalytic Explanation as 'Une Façon de Parler'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):606-620.score: 22.0
    Freud saw the dream as occupying a very important position in his theoretical model. If there were to be problems with his theoretical account of the dream then this would impinge upon proposed therapy and, of course, education as the right balance between the instincts and the institution of culture. Wittgenstein, whilst stating that Freud was interesting and important, raised several issues in relation to psychology/psychoanalysis, and to Freud in particular. Why would Wittgenstein have seen Freud as having some important (...)
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  22. Norman Malcolm (1956). Dreaming and Skepticism. Philosophical Review 65 (January):14-37.score: 21.0
  23. Antti Revonsuo & Katja Valli (2000). Dreaming and Consciousness: Testing the Threat Simulation Theory of the Function of Dreaming. Psyche 6 (8).score: 21.0
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  24. S. LaBerge & D. DeGracia (2000). Varieties of Lucid Dreaming Experience. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 269--307.score: 21.0
  25. Vere C. Chappell (1963). The Concept of Dreaming. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (July):193-213.score: 21.0
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  26. Bruce Wilshire (2006). On Ernest Sosa's "on Dreaming". Pluralist 1 (1):53-62.score: 21.0
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  27. David F. Pears (1961). Professor Norman Malcolm: Dreaming. Mind 70 (April):145-163.score: 21.0
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  28. Mauricio Infante & Lloyd A. Wells (2004). Children's Dreaming and the Development of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 43 (12):1519-1520.score: 21.0
  29. E. Bentley (2000). Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming. Routledge.score: 21.0
  30. J. F. M. Hunter (1983). The Difference Between Dreaming and Being Awake. Mind 92 (January):80-93.score: 21.0
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  31. Norman Malcolm (1959). Stern's Dreaming. Analysis 19 (December):47.score: 21.0
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  32. S. Schroeder (1997). The Concept of Dreaming: On Three Theses by Malcolm. Philosophical Investigations 20 (1):15-38.score: 21.0
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  33. Martin Kramer (1962). Malcolm on Dreaming. Mind 71 (January):81-86.score: 21.0
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  34. K. Stern (1959). Malcolm's Dreaming. Analysis 19 (December):44-46.score: 21.0
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  35. Neil A. Gallagher (1976). A Plea to Stop Dreaming About Dreaming. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (March):423-424.score: 21.0
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  36. J. F. M. Hunter (1971). Some Questions About Dreaming. Mind 80 (January):70-92.score: 21.0
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  37. Michael P. Hodges & William R. Carter (1969). Nelson on Dreaming a Pain. Philosophical Studies 20 (April):43-46.score: 21.0
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  38. Brian Cantwell Smith (1965). Dreaming. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (May):48-57.score: 21.0
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  39. Allan Combs, David Kahn & Stanley Krippner (2000). Dreaming and the Self-Organizing Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (7):4-11.score: 21.0
  40. Norman Malcolm (1962). Dreaming. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 21.0
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  41. Derek P. Brereton (2000). Dreaming, Adaptation, and Consciousness: The Social Mapping Hypothesis. Ethos 28 (3):377-409.score: 21.0
  42. Perrine M. Ruby (2011). Experimental Research on Dreaming: State of the Art and Neuropsychoanalytic Perspectives. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
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  43. David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2003). State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.score: 21.0
  44. Donald S. Mannison (1975). Dreaming an Impossible Dream. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (June):663-75.score: 21.0
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  45. Edward F. Pace-Schott (2013). Dreaming as a Story-Telling Instinct. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  46. Hilary Putnam (1962). Dreaming and 'Depth Grammar'. In Ronald J. Butler (ed.), Analytical Philosophy: First Series. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  47. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2003). Conscious Unity, Emotion, Dreaming, and the Solution of the Hard Problem. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
  48. Charles E. M. Dunlop (ed.) (1977). Philosophical Essays on Dreaming. Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  49. Mark Solms (2002). Dreaming: Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Hypotheses. In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 123-131.score: 21.0
  50. Tarab Tulku (2000). Lucid Dreaming: Exerting the Creativity of the Unconscious. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser. 271-283.score: 21.0
     
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