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Drew McDermott [25]Drew V. McDermott [1]
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Profile: Drew McDermott (Yale University)
  1. Drew McDermott, The Obvious Argument for the Inconceivability of Zombies.
    Zombies are hypothetical creatures identical to us in behavior and internal functionality, but lacking experience. When the concept of zombie is examined in careful detail, it is found that the attempt to keep experience out does not work. So the concept of zombie is the same as the concept of person. Because they are only trivially conceivable, zombies are in a sense inconceivable.
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  2. Drew McDermott (forthcoming). Review of Aristotle's Laptop: The Discovery of Our Informational Mind by Igor Aleksander and Helen Morton. [REVIEW] .
    Drew McDermott, Int. J. Mach. Conscious., 06, 45 (2014). DOI: 10.1142/S1793843014400071.
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  3. Drew McDermott (2014). On the Claim That a Table-Lookup Program Could Pass the Turing Test. Minds and Machines 24 (2):143-188.
    The claim has often been made that passing the Turing Test would not be sufficient to prove that a computer program was intelligent because a trivial program could do it, namely, the “Humongous-Table (HT) Program”, which simply looks up in a table what to say next. This claim is examined in detail. Three ground rules are argued for: (1) That the HT program must be exhaustive, and not be based on some vaguely imagined set of tricks. (2) That the HT (...)
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  4. Drew McDermott (2012). Response to The Singularity by David Chalmers. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (1-2):1-2.
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  5. Drew Mcdermott (2011). A Little Static for the Dynamicists Review of Shanahan. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):361-365.
  6. Drew McDermott (2011). What Matters to a Machine. In M. Anderson S. Anderson (ed.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge Univ. Press. 88--114.
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  7. Drew Mcdermott (2010). Erratum: "What Does a Sloman Want?". International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (02):385-385.
  8. Drew Mcdermott (2010). What Does a Sloman Want? International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):51-53.
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  9. Drew McDermott (2007). Artificial Intelligence and Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge. 117--150.
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  10. Drew McDermott (2007). Dodging the Explanatory Gap–or Bridging It. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):518-518.
    Assuming our understanding of the brain continues to advance, we will at some point have a computational theory of how access consciousness works. Block's supposed additional kind of consciousness will not appear in this theory, and continued belief in it will be difficult to sustain. Appeals to to experience such-and-such will carry little weight when we cannot locate a subject for whom it might be like something.
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  11. Drew McDermott (2001). The Digital Computer as Red Herring. Psycoloquy 12 (54).
    Stevan Harnad correctly perceives a deep problem in computationalism, the hypothesis that cognition is computation, namely, that the symbols manipulated by a computational entity do not automatically mean anything. Perhaps, he proposes, transducers and neural nets will not have this problem. His analysis goes wrong from the start, because computationalism is not as rigid a set of theories as he thinks. Transducers and neural nets are just two kinds of computational system, among many, and any solution to the semantic problem (...)
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  12. Drew V. McDermott (ed.) (2001). Mind and Mechanism. Yale University.
    An exploration of the mind-body problem from the perspective of artificial intelligence.
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  13. Drew McDermott (1999). A Vehicle with No Wheels. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):161-161.
    O'Brien & Opie's theory fails to address the issue of consciousness and introspection. They take for granted that once something is experienced, it can be commented on. But introspection requires neural structures that, according to their theory, have nothing to do with experience as such. That makes the tight coupling between the two in humans a mystery.
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  14. Drew McDermott (1997). How Intelligent is Deep Blue? New York Times (May) 14.
  15. Drew McDermott (1996). [Star] Penrose is Wrong. Psyche 2:66-82.
     
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  16. Drew McDermott (1992). Little “Me”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):217-218.
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  17. Drew McDermott (1990). Computation and Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):676-678.
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  18. Drew McDermott (1990). Zombies Are People, Too. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):617-618.
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  19. Drew McDermott (1989). Optimization and Connectionism Are Two Different Things. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):483.
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  20. Drew McDermott (1987). A Critique of Pure Reason. Computational Intelligence 3:151-60.
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  21. Drew McDermott (1987). We've Been Framed: Or, Why AI is Innocent of the Frame Problem. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex.
     
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  22. Drew McDermott (1982). A Temporal Logic for Reasoning About Processes and Plans. Cognitive Science 6 (2):101-155.
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  23. Drew McDermott (1982). Minds, Brains, Programs, and Persons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):339.
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  24. Drew McDermott (1981). Artificial Intelligence Meets Natural Stupidity. In J. Haugel (ed.), Mind Design. MIT Press. 5-18.
  25. Drew McDermott (1978). Planning and Acting. Cognitive Science 2 (2):71-100.
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  26. Drew McDermott (1978). Tarskian Semantics, or No Notation Without Denotation. Cognitive Science 2 (3):277-82.