1. Kevin Conrad Dieter & Duje Tadin (2011). Understanding Attentional Modulation of Binocular Rivalry: A Framework Based on Biased Competition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
    Starting from early scientific explorations of binocular rivalry, researchers have wondered about the degree to which an observer can exert voluntary attentional control over rivalry dynamics. The answer to this question would not only reveal the extent to which we may determine our own conscious visual experience, but also advance our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying binocular rivalry. Classic studies, intriguingly, reached contradictory conclusions, ranging from an absence of attentional control, as advocated by Breese, to nearly complete control of (...)
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  2. Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
  3. Duje Tadin, Peiyan Wong, Michael W. Mebane, Michael J. Berkowitz, Hollister Trott & Sohee Park (2005). Believing is Seeing in Schizophrenia: The Role of Top-Down Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):775-775.
    The etiology of visual hallucinations is largely undetermined in schizophrenia. Collerton et al.'s PAD model partly concurs with what we know about neurocognition in schizophrenia, but we need to specify the types of perceptual and attentional abnormalities that are implicated in recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH). Available data suggest that abnormal attentional control and top-down processing play a larger role than the ventral stream deficits.
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