Search results for 'Duty to Warn ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David B. Resnik & Darryl C. Zeldin (2008). Environmental Health Research on Hazards in the Home and the Duty to Warn. Bioethics 22 (4):209–217.score: 1132.0
    When environmental health researchers study hazards in the home, they often discover information that may be relevant to protecting the health and safety of the research subjects and occupants. This article describes the ethical and legal basis for a duty to warn research subjects and occupants about hazards in the home and explores the extent of this duty. Investigators should inform research subjects and occupants about the results of tests conducted as part of the research protocol only (...)
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  2. Christian Säfken & Andreas Frewer (2007). The Duty to Warn and Clinical Ethics: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Confidentiality and HIV/AIDS. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 19 (4):313-326.score: 1005.0
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  3. Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Questioning Bioethics: AIDS, Sexual Ethics, and the Duty to Warn. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):26-35.score: 1005.0
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  4. Steven K. Huprich, Kristi M. Fuller & Robert B. Schneider (2003). Divergent Ethical Perspectives on the Duty-to-Warn Principle with Hiv Patients. Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):263 – 278.score: 811.0
    This article presents the case of an HIV-positive client who reported having sexual relations with an unknowing partner. The issue raised is whether the therapist was required to warn the unknowing partner, similar to the Tarasoff mandate that is imposed on therapists. The case is analyzed from an ethical framework similar to that presented by Beauchamp and Childress (1994). Two opinions are presented, each leading to different conclusions about whether the therapist should inform the unknowing partner. It is concluded (...)
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  5. James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.) (2009). The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association.score: 783.0
     
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  6. M. Sehiralti & R. A. Er (2012). Decisions of Psychiatric Nurses About Duty to Warn, Compulsory Hospitalization, and Competence of Patients. Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012448953.score: 742.0
    Nurses who attend patients with psychiatric disorders often encounter ethical dilemmas and experience difficulties in making the right decision. The present study aimed to evaluate the decisions of psychiatric nurses regarding their duty to warn third parties about the dangerousness of the patient, the need for compulsory hospitalization, and the competence of patients. In total, 111 nurses working in the field of psychiatry in Turkey completed a questionnaire form consisting of 33 questions. The nurses generally assessed the decision-making (...)
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  7. James R. Corbin (2008). Disclosure of HIV Status to an Infected Child: Confidentiality, Duty to Warn, and Ethical Practice. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (1):53.score: 737.0
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  8. Diane K. Kjervik (1981). The Psychiatric Nurse's Duty to Warn Potential Victims of Homicidal Psychotherapy Outpatients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (4):11-16.score: 597.0
  9. K. J. Dempsey (1996). New Jersey Superior Court Broadens Physician's Duty to Warn. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (4):391.score: 597.0
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  10. A. Sirinskiene, J. Juskevicius & A. Naberkovas (2005). Confidentiality and Duty to Warn the Third Parties in HIV/AIDS Context. Medicínska Etika a Bioetika: Časopis Ústavu Medicínskej Etiky a Bioetiky= Medical Ethics and Bioethics 12 (1).score: 597.0
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  11. J. A. Martin (1995). California Court Expands Physicians' Duty to Warn HIV Patients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):209.score: 597.0
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  12. Mine Sehiralti & A. Er Rahime (2013). Decisions of Psychiatric Nurses About Duty to Warn, Compulsory Hospitalization, and Competence of Patients. Nursing Ethics 20 (1):41-50.score: 597.0
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  13. John Hardwig (2000). Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics. Routledge.score: 531.0
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers (...)
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  14. P. Langat, D. Pisartchik, D. Silva, C. Bernard, K. Olsen, M. Smith, S. Sahni & R. Upshur (2011). Is There a Duty to Share? Ethics of Sharing Research Data in the Context of Public Health Emergencies. Public Health Ethics 4 (1):4-11.score: 503.3
    Making research data readily accessible during a public health emergency can have profound effects on our response capabilities. The moral milieu of this data sharing has not yet been adequately explored. This article explores the foundation and nature of a duty, if any, that researchers have to share data, specifically in the context of public health emergencies. There are three notable reasons that stand in opposition to a duty to share one’s data, relating to: (i) data property and (...)
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  15. Mark M. Leach (2009). International Ethics Codes and the Duty to Protect. In James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.), The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association.score: 483.8
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  16. Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood (2008). Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.score: 468.0
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting (...)
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  17. Charles L. Sprung, Leonid A. Eidelman & Avraham Steinberg (1997). Is the Patient's Right to Die Evolving Into a Duty to Die?: Medical Decision Making and Ethical Evaluations in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (1):69-75.score: 448.5
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  18. Bernice Elger, Katarzyna Michaud & Patrice Mangin (2010). When Information Can Save Lives: The Duty to Warn Relatives About Sudden Cardiac Death and Environmental Risks. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):39-45.score: 438.8
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  19. Frederic G. Reamer & Sylvan J. Schaffer (1985). A Duty to Warn, An Uncertain Danger. Hastings Center Report 15 (1):17-18.score: 438.8
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  20. George J. Annas (1976). Confidentiality and the Duty to Warn. Hastings Center Report 6 (6):6-8.score: 438.8
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  21. David C. Flagel (1996). On Second Thought: A Canadian Reflection Informing After the Fact: AIDS, Confidentiality, and the Duty to Warn. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 8 (4):212-220.score: 438.8
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  22. Yvonne Bombard, Kenneth Offit & Mark E. Robson (2012). Risks to Relatives in Genomic Research: A Duty to Warn? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):12-14.score: 438.8
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 12-14, October 2012.
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  23. Seema K. Shah, Sara Chandros Hull, Michael A. Spinner, Benjamin E. Berkman, Lauren A. Sanchez, Ruquyyah Abdul-Karim, Amy P. Hsu, Reginald Claypool & Steven M. Holland (2013). What Does the Duty to Warn Require? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):62 - 63.score: 438.8
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  24. J. Gilbert (2001). Biomedical Ethics Reviews, Is There a Duty to Die?: Edited by James M Humber and Robert F Almeder, Totawa, New Jersey, Humana Press, 2000, 221 Pages, US$49.50. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):209-a-210.score: 436.5
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  25. Colin Farrelly (2013). Empirical Ethics and the Duty to Extend the “Biological Warranty Period”. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):480-503.score: 436.5
    The world's aging populations face novel health challenges never experienced before in human history. The moral landscape thus needs to adapt to reflect this novel empirical reality. In this paper I take for granted one basic moral principle advanced by Peter Singer and explore the implications that empirical considerations from demography, evolutionary biology, and biogerontology have for the way we conceive of fulfilling this principle at the operational level. After bringing to the fore a number of considerations that Singer ignores, (...)
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  26. Daniel T. Ostas (forthcoming). The Law and Ethics of K Street: Lobbying, the First Amendment, and the Duty to Create Just Laws. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 436.5
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  27. Susan Leigh Anderson & Michael Anderson (2011). A Prima Facie Duty Approach to Machine Ethics Machine Learning of Features of Ethical Dilemmas, Prima Facie Duties, and Decision Principles Through a Dialogue with Ethicists. In M. Anderson S. Anderson (ed.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge Univ. Press.score: 436.5
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  28. Noam Zion (2012). The Ethics of Economics: Israeli Haredim and Israeli Arabs-the Duty to Work and the Duty to Provide Work. Ethics 2:23.score: 436.5
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  29. David Carr (1999). Professional Education and Professional Ethics Right to Die or Duty to Live? Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):33–46.score: 427.5
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  30. Pat J. Gehrke (2002). Turning Kant Against the Priority of Autonomy: Communication Ethics and the Duty to Community. Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (1):1-21.score: 427.5
  31. Bruce D. Feldstein & Richard Ogle (1997). Satisfaction, Managed Ethics, and the Duty to Design. HEC Forum 9 (4):333-354.score: 427.5
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  32. Christian Beck (2006). The Duty to Love in Immanuel Kant: A Short Comment From the Perspective of Theological Ethics. Disputatio Philosophica 8 (1):121-128.score: 427.5
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  33. D. Smrekova (2001). From the Obedience to the Duty to the Morality of Virtue (Deontologism, Consequentialism and the Ethics of Virtue). Filozofia 56 (3):174-186.score: 427.5
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  34. Lawrence O. Gostin & Robert Archer (2007). The Duty of States to Assist Other States in Need: Ethics, Human Rights, and International Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):526-533.score: 414.0
  35. M. Denscombe, G. Dingwall & T. Hillier (2008). At the Genesis of a Research Idea: Defending and Defining a Duty Prior to Ethics Review. Research Ethics 4 (2):73-75.score: 414.0
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  36. Lee Wilkins (2008). Connecting Care and Duty : How Neuroscience and Feminist Ethics Can Contribute to Understanding Professional Moral Development. In Stephen J. A. Ward & Herman Wasserman (eds.), Media Ethics Beyond Borders: A Global Perspective. Heinemann.score: 414.0
  37. Marcia Baron (1985). The Ethics of Duty/Ethics of Virtue Debate and Its Relevance to Educational Theory. Educational Theory 35 (2):135-149.score: 405.0
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  38. André Mineau (2007). Himmler's Ethics of Duty: A Moral Approach to the Holocaust and to Germany's Impending Defeat. The European Legacy 12 (1):55-73.score: 405.0
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  39. Toby Svoboda (2012). Duties Regarding Nature: A Kantian Approach to Environmental Ethics. Kant Yearbook 4 (1):143-163.score: 381.0
    Many philosophers have objected to Kant’s account of duties regarding non-human nature, arguing that it does not ground adequate moral concern for non-human natural entities. However, the traditional interpretation of Kant on this issue is mistaken, because it takes him to be arguing merely that humans should abstain from animal cruelty and wanton destruction of flora solely because such actions could make one more likely to violate one’s duties to human beings. Instead, I argue, Kant’s account of duties regarding nature (...)
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  40. Michael Cholbi (forthcoming). Kant on Euthanasia and the Duty to Die: Clearing the Air. Journal of Medical Ethics.score: 375.0
    Thanks to recent scholarship, Kant is no longer seen as the dogmatic opponent of suicide he appears at first glance. However, some interpreters have recently argued for a Kantian view of the morality of suicide with surprising, even radical, implications. More specifically, they have argued that Kantianism (a) requires that those with dementia or other rationality-eroding conditions end their lives before their condition results in their loss of identity as moral agents, and (b) requires subjecting the fully demented or those (...)
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  41. Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.score: 369.0
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many (...)
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  42. Tina Rulli & Joseph Millum (2014). Rescuing the Duty to Rescue. Journal of Medical Ethics:1-5.score: 348.0
    Clinicians and health researchers frequently encounter opportunities to rescue people. Rescue cases can generate a moral duty to aid those in peril. As such, bioethicists have leveraged a duty to rescue for a variety of purposes. Yet, despite its broad application, the duty to rescue is under-analyzed. In this paper, we assess the state of theorizing about the duty to rescue. There are large gaps in bioethicists’ understanding of the force, scope, and justification of the two (...)
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  43. Lara Denis (1997). Kant's Ethics and Duties to Oneself. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321–348.score: 329.0
    This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them-selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant's moral theory is overly demanding or produces agents who are preoccupied with their own virtue. (...)
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  44. Florian Wettstein (2010). The Duty to Protect: Corporate Complicity, Political Responsibility, and Human Rights Advocacy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):33 - 47.score: 328.5
    Recent years have heralded increasing attention to the role of multinational corporations in regard to human rights violations. The concept of complicity has been of particular interest in this regard. This article explores the conceptual differences between silent complicity in particular and other, more "conventional" forms of complicity. Despite their far-reaching normative implications, these differences are often overlooked.Rather than being connected to specific actions as is the case for other forms of complicity, the concept of silent complicity is tied to (...)
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  45. Lucy Carter (2007). A Case for a Duty to Feed the Hungry: GM Plants and the Third World. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):69-82.score: 324.0
    This article is concerned with a discussion of the plausibility of the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with sufficient food for subsistence. Following a brief outline of the potential applications of GM in this context, a history of the green revolution and its impact will be discussed in relation to the current developing world agriculture situation. Following a contemporary analysis of malnutrition, the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with (...)
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  46. E. Cave & C. Nichols (2007). Reforming the Ethical Review System: Balancing the Rights and Interests of Research Participants with the Duty to Facilitate Good Research. Clinical Ethics 2 (2):74-79.score: 322.5
    Researchers have frequently complained that the NHS ethical review system stifles good research. At last measures are being put in place to address this criticism, but will they undermine the protection of research participants? The Declaration of Helsinki recognizes that medicine will not progress without good quality research, but also demands that the well-being of research participants takes precedence over the interests of science and society. This article examines the implications of the ongoing reform of the NHS research ethics (...)
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  47. Irene Oh (2013). Muslim Governance and the Duty to Protect. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):15-19.score: 319.5
    In this response to Johnson, Oh reaffirms the scholarly vision of Kelsay and Twiss, elaborates upon Muslim perspectives on human rights, and questions the emphasis on violent humanitarian interventions as part of the Responsibility to Protect mandate. Oh suggests that, in light of the historical relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim states and the aftermath of the second Iraq War, more consideration be given to the rebuilding of Muslim-majority societies. Oh also highlights the concept of duty as a religiously based (...)
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  48. Christopher Heath Wellman (2005). Is There a Duty to Obey the Law? Cambridge University Press.score: 315.0
    The central question in political philosophy is whether political states have the right to coerce their constituents and whether citizens have a moral duty to obey the commands of their state. Christopher Heath Wellman and A. John Simmons defend opposing answers to this question. Wellman bases his argument on samaritan obligations to perform easy rescues, arguing that each of us has a moral duty to obey the law as his or her fair share of the communal samaritan chore (...)
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  49. Michael Cassidy, Character and Context: What Virtue Theory Can Teach Us About a Prosecutor's Ethical Duty to 'Seek Justice'.score: 315.0
    A critical issue facing the criminal justice system today is how best to promote ethical behavior by public prosecutors. The legal profession has left much of a prosecutor’s day-to-day activity unregulated, in favor of a general, catch-all admonition to “seek justice.” In this article the author argues that professional norms are truly functional only if those working with a given ethical framework recognize the system’s implicit dependence on character. A code of professional conduct in which this dependence is not recognized (...)
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  50. Ernest N. Biktimirov & Don Cyr (2013). Using Inside Job to Teach Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):209-219.score: 312.0
    This article recommends the film Inside Job as an effective teaching tool for illustrating the ethical issues that surrounded the global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent economic downturn. The study discusses issues such as the revolving door, conflicts of interest, fiduciary duty, executive compensation, and financial regulation. The presentation of each ethical issue comprises suggested questions, background information, and guides to specific sections of the film. An overview of the film is provided as well.
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