Search results for 'Duty to Warn ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    David B. Resnik & Darryl C. Zeldin (2008). Environmental Health Research on Hazards in the Home and the Duty to Warn. Bioethics 22 (4):209–217.
    When environmental health researchers study hazards in the home, they often discover information that may be relevant to protecting the health and safety of the research subjects and occupants. This article describes the ethical and legal basis for a duty to warn research subjects and occupants about hazards in the home and explores the extent of this duty. Investigators should inform research subjects and occupants about the results of tests conducted as part of the research protocol only (...)
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  2.  18
    Christian Säfken & Andreas Frewer (2007). The Duty to Warn and Clinical Ethics: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Confidentiality and HIV/AIDS. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 19 (4):313-326.
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  3.  3
    Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Questioning Bioethics: AIDS, Sexual Ethics, and the Duty to Warn. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):26-35.
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  4.  13
    M. Sehiralti & R. A. Er (2012). Decisions of Psychiatric Nurses About Duty to Warn, Compulsory Hospitalization, and Competence of Patients. Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012448953.
    Nurses who attend patients with psychiatric disorders often encounter ethical dilemmas and experience difficulties in making the right decision. The present study aimed to evaluate the decisions of psychiatric nurses regarding their duty to warn third parties about the dangerousness of the patient, the need for compulsory hospitalization, and the competence of patients. In total, 111 nurses working in the field of psychiatry in Turkey completed a questionnaire form consisting of 33 questions. The nurses generally assessed the decision-making (...)
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  5.  2
    Meaghann Weaver (2016). The Double Helix: Applying an Ethic of Care to the Duty to Warn Genetic Relatives of Genetic Information. Bioethics 30 (3):181-187.
    Genetic testing reveals information about a patient's health status and predictions about the patient's future wellness, while also potentially disclosing health information relevant to other family members. With the increasing availability and affordability of genetic testing and the integration of genetics into mainstream medicine, the importance of clarifying the scope of confidentiality and the rules regarding disclosure of genetic findings to genetic relatives is prime. The United Nations International Declaration on Human Genetic Data urges an appreciation for principles of equality, (...)
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  6.  4
    Victoria Doudenkova & Jean-Christophe Bélisle Pipon (2016). Duty to Inform and Informed Consent in Diagnostic Radiology: How Ethics and Law Can Better Guide Practice. HEC Forum 28 (1):75-94.
    Although there is consensus on the fact that ionizing radiation used in radiological examinations can affect health, the stochastic nature of risk makes it difficult to anticipate and assess specific health implications for patients. The issue of radiation protection is peculiar as any dosage received in life is cumulative, the sensitivity to radiation is highly variable from one person to another, and between 20 % and 50 % of radiological examinations appear not to be necessary. In this context, one might (...)
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  7. James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.) (2009). The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association.
     
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  8.  28
    Steven K. Huprich, Kristi M. Fuller & Robert B. Schneider (2003). Divergent Ethical Perspectives on the Duty-to-Warn Principle with Hiv Patients. Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):263 – 278.
    This article presents the case of an HIV-positive client who reported having sexual relations with an unknowing partner. The issue raised is whether the therapist was required to warn the unknowing partner, similar to the Tarasoff mandate that is imposed on therapists. The case is analyzed from an ethical framework similar to that presented by Beauchamp and Childress (1994). Two opinions are presented, each leading to different conclusions about whether the therapist should inform the unknowing partner. It is concluded (...)
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  9.  49
    Rebecca Johnson, Govind Persad & Dominic Sisti (2014). The Tarasoff Rule: The Implications of Interstate Variation and Gaps in Professional Training. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Online 42 (4):469-477.
    Recent events have revived questions about the circumstances that ought to trigger therapists' duty to warn or protect. There is extensive interstate variation in duty to warn or protect statutes enacted and rulings made in the wake of the California Tarasoff ruling. These duties may be codified in legislative statutes, established in common law through court rulings, or remain unspecified. Furthermore, the duty to warn or protect is not only variable between states but also (...)
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  10.  6
    Eugene Schlossberger (forthcoming). Engineering Codes of Ethics and the Duty to Set a Moral Precedent. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-12.
    Each of the major engineering societies has its own code of ethics. Seven “common core” clauses and several code-specific clauses can be identified. The paper articulates objections to and rationales for two clauses that raise controversy: do engineers have a duty to provide pro bono services and/or speak out on major issues, and to associate only with reputable individuals and organizations? This latter “association clause” can be justified by the “proclamative principle,” an alternative to Kant’s universalizability requirement. At (...)
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  11.  4
    James R. Corbin (2008). Disclosure of HIV Status to an Infected Child: Confidentiality, Duty to Warn, and Ethical Practice. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (1):53.
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  12.  4
    Mine Sehiralti & A. Er Rahime (2013). Decisions of Psychiatric Nurses About Duty to Warn, Compulsory Hospitalization, and Competence of Patients. Nursing Ethics 20 (1):41-50.
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  13.  3
    A. Sirinskiene, J. Juskevicius & A. Naberkovas (2005). Confidentiality and Duty to Warn the Third Parties in HIV/AIDS Context. Medicínska Etika a Bioetika: Časopis Ústavu Medicínskej Etiky a Bioetiky= Medical Ethics and Bioethics 12 (1).
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  14.  5
    Diane K. Kjervik (1981). The Psychiatric Nurse's Duty to Warn Potential Victims of Homicidal Psychotherapy Outpatients. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 9 (4):11-16.
  15.  1
    K. J. Dempsey (1996). New Jersey Superior Court Broadens Physician's Duty to Warn. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 24 (4):391.
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  16. Diane K. Kjervik (1981). The Psychiatric Nurse's Duty to Warn Potential Victims of Homicidal Psychotherapy Outpatients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (4):11-16.
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  17. J. A. Martin (1995). California Court Expands Physicians' Duty to Warn HIV Patients. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 23 (2):209.
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  18. John Hardwig (2000). Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics. Routledge.
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers (...)
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  19.  3
    Daniel T. Ostas (2007). The Law and Ethics of K Street: Lobbying, the First Amendment, and the Duty to Create Just Laws. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):33-63.
    This article explores the law and ethics of lobbying. The legal discussion examines disclosure regulations, employment restrictions,bribery laws, and anti-fraud provisions as each applies to the lobbying context. The analysis demonstrates that given the social value placed on the First Amendment, federal law generally affords lobbyists wide latitude in determining who, what, when, where, and how to lobby.The article then turns to ethics. Lobbying involves deliberate attempts to effect changes in the law. An argument is advanced that because (...)
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  20. Sarah Clark Miller (2003). The Duty to Care: Need and Agency in Kantian and Feminist Ethics. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    Contemporary ethical and political discourses frequently refer to the moral force of needs as justifying access to resources and rights to goods. Can needs make normative claims on anyone, and if so, how? What obligations do moral agents have to respond to the needs of other people? As finite creatures, humans inevitably experience need. Certain kinds of needs, namely fundamental needs, must be met if individuals are to avoid the harm of compromised agency. Fundamental needs involve agency-threatening events or circumstances (...)
     
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  21.  22
    P. Langat, D. Pisartchik, D. Silva, C. Bernard, K. Olsen, M. Smith, S. Sahni & R. Upshur (2011). Is There a Duty to Share? Ethics of Sharing Research Data in the Context of Public Health Emergencies. Public Health Ethics 4 (1):4-11.
    Making research data readily accessible during a public health emergency can have profound effects on our response capabilities. The moral milieu of this data sharing has not yet been adequately explored. This article explores the foundation and nature of a duty, if any, that researchers have to share data, specifically in the context of public health emergencies. There are three notable reasons that stand in opposition to a duty to share one’s data, relating to: (i) data property and (...)
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  22.  18
    Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood (2008). Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting (...)
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  23. Mark M. Leach (2009). International Ethics Codes and the Duty to Protect. In James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.), The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association
     
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  24.  7
    Bruce D. Feldstein & Richard Ogle (1997). Satisfaction, Managed Ethics, and the Duty to Design. HEC Forum 9 (4):333-354.
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  25. Seema K. Shah, Sara Chandros Hull, Michael A. Spinner, Benjamin E. Berkman, Lauren A. Sanchez, Ruquyyah Abdul-Karim, Amy P. Hsu, Reginald Claypool & Steven M. Holland (2013). What Does the Duty to Warn Require? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):62 - 63.
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  26. Yvonne Bombard, Kenneth Offit & Mark E. Robson (2012). Risks to Relatives in Genomic Research: A Duty to Warn? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):12-14.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 12-14, October 2012.
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  27.  4
    Frederic G. Reamer & Sylvan J. Schaffer (1985). A Duty to Warn, An Uncertain Danger. Hastings Center Report 15 (1):17-18.
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  28.  11
    Bernice Elger, Katarzyna Michaud & Patrice Mangin (2010). When Information Can Save Lives: The Duty to Warn Relatives About Sudden Cardiac Death and Environmental Risks. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):39-45.
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  29.  9
    David C. Flagel (1996). On Second Thought: A Canadian Reflection Informing After the Fact: AIDS, Confidentiality, and the Duty to Warn. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 8 (4):212-220.
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  30.  3
    George J. Annas (1976). Confidentiality and the Duty to Warn. Hastings Center Report 6 (6):6-8.
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  31.  6
    Noam Zion (2012). The Ethics of Economics: Israeli Haredim and Israeli Arabs-the Duty to Work and the Duty to Provide Work. Ethics 2:23.
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  32.  1
    Colin Farrelly (2014). Empirical Ethics and the Duty to Extend the “Biological Warranty Period”. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):480-503.
    The world's aging populations face novel health challenges never experienced before in human history. The moral landscape thus needs to adapt to reflect this novel empirical reality. In this paper I take for granted one basic moral principle advanced by Peter Singer — a principle of preventing bad occurrences — and explore the implications that empirical considerations from demography, evolutionary biology, and biogerontology have for the way we conceive of fulfilling this principle at the operational level. After bringing to the (...)
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  33.  6
    Colin Farrelly (2013). Empirical Ethics and the Duty to Extend the “Biological Warranty Period”. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):480-503.
    The world's aging populations face novel health challenges never experienced before in human history. The moral landscape thus needs to adapt to reflect this novel empirical reality. In this paper I take for granted one basic moral principle advanced by Peter Singer and explore the implications that empirical considerations from demography, evolutionary biology, and biogerontology have for the way we conceive of fulfilling this principle at the operational level. After bringing to the fore a number of considerations that Singer ignores, (...)
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  34.  7
    J. Gilbert (2001). Biomedical Ethics Reviews, Is There a Duty to Die?: Edited by James M Humber and Robert F Almeder, Totawa, New Jersey, Humana Press, 2000, 221 Pages, US$49.50. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):209-a-210.
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  35.  1
    Susan Leigh Anderson & Michael Anderson (2011). A Prima Facie Duty Approach to Machine Ethics Machine Learning of Features of Ethical Dilemmas, Prima Facie Duties, and Decision Principles Through a Dialogue with Ethicists. In M. Anderson S. Anderson (ed.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge Univ. Press
  36. David Ardagh (2000). Ethics, Empowerment, and Education: A Neo-Aristotelian Case for the Public Duty to Educate and Train. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 2 (2).
     
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  37.  57
    David Carr (1999). Professional Education and Professional Ethics Right to Die or Duty to Live? Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):33–46.
  38.  21
    Pat J. Gehrke (2002). Turning Kant Against the Priority of Autonomy: Communication Ethics and the Duty to Community. Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (1):1-21.
  39.  2
    Christian Beck (2006). The Duty to Love in Immanuel Kant: A Short Comment From the Perspective of Theological Ethics. Disputatio Philosophica 8 (1):121-128.
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  40. D. Smrekova (2001). From the Obedience to the Duty to the Morality of Virtue (Deontologism, Consequentialism and the Ethics of Virtue). Filozofia 56 (3):174-186.
     
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  41.  5
    Lawrence O. Gostin & Robert Archer (2007). The Duty of States to Assist Other States in Need: Ethics, Human Rights, and International Law. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (4):526-533.
    In this article, Gostin and Archer explore the varied lenses through which governments are obligated to address humanitarian needs. States’responsibilities to help others derive from domestic law, political commitments, ethical values, national interests, and international law. What is needed, however, is clarity and detailed standards so that States can operationalize this responsibility, making it real for developing countries. Transnational cooperation needs to be more effective and consistent to provide assistance for the world's poorest and least healthy people.
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  42.  19
    Lynette Reid (2005). Diminishing Returns? Risk and the Duty to Care in the Sars Epidemic. Bioethics 19 (4):348–361.
    The seriousness of the risk that healthcare workers faced during SARS, and their response of service in the face of this risk, brings to light unrealistic assumptions about duty and risk that informed the debate on duty to care in the early years of HIV/AIDS. Duty to care is not based upon particular virtues of the health professions, but arises from social reflection on what response to an epidemic would be consistent with our values and our needs, (...)
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  43. Lee Wilkins (2008). Connecting Care and Duty : How Neuroscience and Feminist Ethics Can Contribute to Understanding Professional Moral Development. In Stephen J. A. Ward & Herman Wasserman (eds.), Media Ethics Beyond Borders: A Global Perspective. Heinemann
  44. Lawrence O. Gostin & Robert Archer (2007). The Duty of States to Assist Other States in Need: Ethics, Human Rights, and International Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):526-533.
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  45.  1
    M. Denscombe, G. Dingwall & T. Hillier (2008). At the Genesis of a Research Idea: Defending and Defining a Duty Prior to Ethics Review. Research Ethics 4 (2):73-75.
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  46.  14
    Marcia Baron (1985). The Ethics of Duty/Ethics of Virtue Debate and Its Relevance to Educational Theory. Educational Theory 35 (2):135-149.
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  47.  2
    André Mineau (2007). Himmler's Ethics of Duty: A Moral Approach to the Holocaust and to Germany's Impending Defeat. The European Legacy 12 (1):55-73.
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  48. Adam Chmielewski (2012). Duty and Beauty. Evolutionary Ethics in Relation to the Darvinian Aesthetics . Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 7.
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  49. Michael Cholbi (2015). Kant on Euthanasia and the Duty to Die: Clearing the Air. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):607-610.
    Thanks to recent scholarship, Kant is no longer seen as the dogmatic opponent of suicide he appears at first glance. However, some interpreters have recently argued for a Kantian view of the morality of suicide with surprising, even radical, implications. More specifically, they have argued that Kantianism requires that those with dementia or other rationality-eroding conditions end their lives before their condition results in their loss of identity as moral agents, and requires subjecting the fully demented or those confronting future (...)
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  50.  10
    Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many (...)
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