22 found
Sort by:
  1. E. A. Milne (1953). Modern Cosmology and the Christian Idea of God. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (15):249-251.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. E. A. Milne & S. C. Roberts (1953). Sir James Jeans: A Biography. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (15):254-256.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. E. A. Milne (1951). Reflections of a Physicist. By P. W. Bridgman. Philosophical Library: New York. Pp. Xii + 392. Philosophy 26 (97):162-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. E. A. Milne (1951). No Title Available: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 26 (97):162-163.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. E. A. Milne (1950). A Modern Conception of Time. Philosophy 25 (92):68 - 72.
    I think that to Lord Kelvin is attributed the saying that the scientific attitude to a thing, if you can't do anything else with it, is to measure it. This is the attitude I propose to adopt towards Time . The situation is to some extent analogous to the situation with regard to electricity . Science is unable to say what electricity is, and so it almost denies the word any entrance into a treatise on the subject. It replaces it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. E. A. Milne (1950). From Euclid to Eddington: A Study of Conceptions of the External World. By Sir Edmund Whittaker Being the Tarner Lectures Delivered in Trinity College, Cambridge, 1947. (Cambridge Univeristy Press. Pp. 212. Price 15s. Net). [REVIEW] Philosophy 25 (93):178-.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. E. A. Milne (1950). The Foundations of Human Thought. By Fr. Vinding Kruse, Professor of Jurisprudence in the University of Copenhagen. (Einar Munksgaard, Copenhagen. Oxford University Press (Geoffrey Cumberlege). 1949. Pp. 404. Price 30s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 25 (93):187-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. E. A. Milne & R. S. F. (1950). Obituary. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 1 (3):256-256.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. E. A. Milne (1949). A Philosophy of Mathematics. By Louis O. Kattsoff, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of North Carolina. (Iowa State College Press, 1948. Pp. Vii + 266. Price $5.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 24 (88):90-.
  10. E. A. Milne (1949). Four Views of Time in Ancient Philosophy. By John F. Callahan. (Harvard University Press. London: Geoffrey Cumberlege. Pp. Ix + 209. Price 16s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 24 (91):349-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. E. A. Milne (1949). Mathematics in Aristotle. By Sir Thomas Heath. (Clarendon Press: Geoffrey Cumberlege. 1949. Pp. Xiv + 291. Price 21s.). Philosophy 24 (91):348-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. E. A. Milne (1949). Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance. By Max Born. Being the Waynflete Lectures Delivered in the College of St. Mary Magdalen, Oxford, in Hilary Term, 1948. (Oxford: Clarendon Press (Geoffrey Cumberlege). Pp. Viii + 215. Price 17s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 24 (91):370-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. E. A. Milne (1949). No Title Available. Philosophy 24 (91):348-349.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. E. A. Milne (1948). Bertrand Russell, Human Knowledge-its Scope and Limits. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 47:298.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. E. A. Milne (1947). Time and Thermodynamics. By A. R. Ubbelohde. (Oxford University Press. Pp. 105. Price 6s. Net.). Philosophy 22 (82):187-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. E. A. Milne (1942). Professor Milne's Reply. Philosophy 17 (65):78-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. E. A. Milne (1941). Remarks on the Philosophical Status of Physics. Philosophy 16 (64):356 - 371.
    Recent results in kinematics, obtained by myself and those working with me, have convinced me that the philosophical status of physics, as it has come down to us from Renaissance days, requires reconsideration. The reason can be stated in a couple of sentences: it has been found possible to establish certain laws of physics—laws of motion, the law of gravitation, the laws known under the name of the Lorentz transformation, and some others—purely deductively, without specific assumptions, and without empirical appeals (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. E. A. Milne (1938). Time and its Importance in Modern Thought. By M. F. Cleugh. (London: Methuen & Co.1937. Pp. X + 308. Price 12s. 6d.). Philosophy 13 (50):226-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. E. A. Milne (1938). No Title Available: New Books. [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (50):226-230.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. E. A. Milne (1936). Relativity, Gravitation, and World-Structure. Philosophical Review 45 (3):324-325.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. E. A. Milne (1934). Some Points in the Philosophy of Physics: Time, Evolution and Creation. Philosophy 9 (33):19 - 38.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. E. A. Milne (1934). Some Points in the Philosophy of Physics: Time, Evolution and Creation1: Some Points in the Philosophy of Physics. Philosophy 9 (33):19-38.
    When I agreed to lecture to-night I stipulated that I might be allowed to interpret the subject announced so as to let my treatment relate less to the subject in general than to some particular aspects which happen to have been interesting me lately. Professor Whitehead, Sir Arthur Eddington, and Sir James Jeans have given to the world brilliant accounts of the present position of physics in relation to mathematics and philosophy. What I have to say bears to their writings, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation