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  1. E. Ann Clark & Hugh Lehman (2001). Assessment of GM Crops in Commercial Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):3-28.
    The caliber of recent discourse regarding geneticallymodified organisms (GMOs) has suffered from a lack of consensuson terminology, from the scarcity of evidence upon which toassess risk to health and to the environment, and from valuedifferences between proponents and opponents of GMOs. Towardsaddressing these issues, we present the thesis that GM should bedefined as the forcible insertion of DNA into a host genome,irrespective of the source of the DNA, and exclusive ofconventional or mutation breeding.Some defenders of the commercial use of GMOs (...)
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  2. E. Ann Clark (1993). Ecological Effects of Genetically Modified Organisms. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):103-106.
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  3. Hugh Lehman, E. Ann Clark & Stephan F. Weise (1993). Clarifying the Definition Ofsustainable Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (2):127-143.
    A number of distinct definitions ofsustainable agriculture have been proposed. In this paper we criticize two such definitions, primarily for conflating sustainability with other objectives such as economic viability and ecological integrity. Finally, we propose and defend a definition which avoids our objections to the other definitions.
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  4. E. Ann Clark (1988). Resolving Conflicting Priorities in Ontario Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (4).
    Changes in global patterns of grain production have affected the profitability of commercial, cash-crop agriculture in North America. The current financial crisis has highlighted a perceived conflict between the priorities of (1) strengthening net farm profit, (2) maintaining the productive potential of the land base, (3) enhancing the health and cohesiveness of the agricultural community, and (4) addressing societal demands for safe foodstuffs. Reducing input costs by reducing the need for privately owned machinery can minimize the scale-dependence of agricultural practices, (...)
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  5. E. Ann Clark & B. R. Christie (1988). A Forage-Based Vision of Ontario Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (2):109-121.
    The necessity of incorporating societal and environmental concerns into publicly funded agricultural initiatives in research, extension, and practice is increasingly evident. Agriculturalists are urged to acknowledge and respond to societal concerns before an insensitive and largely ill-informed urban majority assumes a dominant posture in agricultural policy. In recent history, the availability of unrealistically cheap energy encouraged the evolution of a form of commercial agriculture unfettered by sound ecological principles. At present, external, resource-intensive intervention of increasing magnitude is needed to compensate (...)
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