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  1. E. Brian Davies (2010). Why Beliefs Matter: Reflections on the Nature of Science. OUP Oxford.
    This book discusses deep problems about our place in the world with a minimum of technical jargon. It argues that 'absolutist' ideas dating back to Plato continue to mislead generations of theoretical physicists and theologians. It explains that the multi-layered nature of our present descriptions of the world is unavoidable, not because of anything about the world but because of our own human natures. It tries to rescue mathematics from the singular and exceptional status that it has been assigned, as (...)
     
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  2. E. Brian Davies, The Mechanical Philosophy 1660 - 1675.
    We study the state of mechanics and astronomy between 1660 and 1675 in order to understand the extent of the commitment to the mechanical philosophy of Kepler prior to the writing of Principia.
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  3. E. Brian Davies, Epistemological Pluralism.
    A number of those actively involved in the physical sciences anticipate the creation of a unified approach to all human knowledge based on reductionism in physics and Platonism in mathematics. We argue that it is implausible that this goal will ever be achieved, and argue instead for a pluralistic approach to human understanding, in which mathematically expressed laws of nature are merely one way among several of describing a world that is too complex for our minds to be able to (...)
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  4. E. Brian Davies, Scientific Understanding.
    Many of those actively involved in the physical sciences adopt a reductionist point of view, in which all aspects of the world are ultimately controlled by physical laws that are expressed in terms of mathematical equations. In this article we adopt a pluralistic approach to human understanding in which mathematically expressed laws of nature are merely one way among several of describing a world that is too vast and complex for our minds to be able to grasp in its entirety.
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  5. E. Brian Davies (2005). A Defence of Mathematical Pluralism. Philosophia Mathematica 13 (3):252-276.
    We approach the philosophy of mathematics via an analysis of mathematics as it is practised. This leads us to a classification in terms of four concepts, which we define and illustrate with a variety of examples. We call these concepts background conventions, context, content, and intuition.
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