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Profile: Evan Larson (Princeton University)
  1. E. Larson (1994). Needs Versus Desires. Dialogue 37 (1):1-10.
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  2. Edward J. Larson (2003). The Scopes Trial in History and Legend. In David C. Lindberg & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), When Science and Christianity Meet. University of Chicago Press 245--64.
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    Elaine L. Larson, Sameer J. Patel, David Evans & Lisa Saiman (2013). Feedback as a Strategy to Change Behaviour: The Devil is in the Details. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):230-234.
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  4. Erik W. Larson (2006). Additional Reading. In Alan Soble (ed.), Sex From Plato to Paglia: A Philosophical Encyclopedia. Greenwood Press 1--410.
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  5. Edward J. Larson (2010). Biology and the Emergence of the Anglo-American Eugenics Movement. In Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press
     
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  6. Edward J. Larson (1987). Before the Crusade: Evolution in American Secondary Education Before 1920. Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):89-114.
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    Edward J. Larson (2004). Evolution: The Remarkable History of a Scientific Theory. Modern Library.
    “I often said before starting, that I had no doubt I should frequently repent of the whole undertaking.” So wrote Charles Darwin aboard The Beagle , bound for the Galapagos Islands and what would arguably become the greatest and most controversial discovery in scientific history. But the theory of evolution did not spring full-blown from the head of Darwin. Since the dawn of humanity, priests, philosophers, and scientists have debated the origin and development of life on earth, and with modern (...)
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  8. Everette E. Larson (ed.) (1982). Microfilmed Papers of José Ortega y Gasset Open for Research in the Library of Congress. Library of Congress.
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  9. Edward J. Larson (1991). Science in the American South Through the Eyes of Four Natural Historians, 1750–1850. Annals of Science 48 (3):231-240.
    A national scientific community developed in the United States following the American Revolution. The independent scientific societies, journals and other institutions that formed the basis of this community were, however, centred in the North. An analysis of the work of four leading natural historians of the Southern tidewater suggests that their region participated in this development by shifting scientific ties and allegiances from Europe to the North rather than by creating national or regional scientific institutions.
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