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  1. E. M. Dadlez (2013). Literature, Ethical Thought Experiments, and Moral Knowledge. Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):195-209.
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  2. E. M. Dadlez (2013). The Pleasures of Tragedy. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 450.
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  3. E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell (2013). Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist&Quot;. Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism” has claimed (...)
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  4. E. M. Dadlez (2012). A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature Edited by Hagberg, Garry L. And Walter Jost. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):237-239.
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  5. E. M. Dadlez (2012). Fetal Pain Legislation and the Abortion Debate Presidential Address. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):1-13.
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  6. Dina Zoe Belluigi, Michael Belshaw, Michael Benton, Deborah Bradley, Bert Cardullo, Janine Certo, Wayne Brinda, Leslie Cunliffe, E. M. Dadlez & Rhett Diessner (2011). Index to Volume 45. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4).
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  7. E. M. Dadlez (2011). Comment on “Still in Hot Water” by Duncan Purves. Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (2):57-61.
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  8. E. M. Dadlez (2011). Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances be (...)
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  9. E. M. Dadlez (2010). Seeing and Imagination: Emotional Response to Fictional Film. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):120-135.
  10. E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews (2010). Post-Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction. Bioethics 24 (9):445-452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  11. E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews (2010). Post‐Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction. Bioethics 24 (9):445 - 452.
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm and causal antecedents of (...)
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  12. E. M. Dadlez (2009). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the ideas of the other Proposes that ...
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  13. E. M. Dadlez, William L. Andrews, Courtney Lewis & Marissa Stroud (2009). Rape, Evolution, and Pseudoscience: Natural Selection in the Academy. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):75-96.
  14. E. M. Dadlez (2008). Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen. Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):46-62.
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  15. E. M. Dadlez (2008). Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 315-329.
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much significance (...)
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  16. E. M. Dadlez (2006). Only Kidding. Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  17. E. M. Dadlez (2005). Knowing Setter. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (1):35-44.
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  18. E. M. Dadlez (2005). Spectacularly Bad: Hume and Aristotle on Tragic Spectacle. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):351–358.
  19. E. M. Dadlez (2004). Pleased and Afflicted. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
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  20. E. M. Dadlez (2004). Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  21. E. M. Dadlez (2002). Of Two Minds. Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):185-192.
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  22. E. M. Dadlez (2002). The Vicious Habits of Entirely Fictive People: Hume on the Moral Evaluation of Art. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):143-156.
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  23. E. M. Dadlez (1999). The Beautiful and the Good. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):99-106.
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  24. E. M. Dadlez (1996). Fiction, Emotion, and Rationality. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):290-304.