Search results for 'E. Marya' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lenore Langsdorf, Stephen Watson, Bower H. & E. Marya (eds.) (1996). Phenomenology, Interpretation and Community. State University of New York Press.score: 240.0
    Chapter 1 Presence and Absence in HusserPs Phenomenology of Time-Consciousness JOHN B. BROUGH This will be a rather old-fashioned essay: modern rather than ...
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  2. Mark Reid (1997). Narrative and Fission: A Review Essay of Marya Schechtman's the Constitution of Selves. Philosophical Psychology 10 (2):211 – 219.score: 36.0
    This book presents, in method, logical form, and philosophical content, a counterproposal to mainstream personal identity theory. The lotter's purported conflation of logical questions, i.e. reidentification with characterization, leads to an implausible reductionism about selves. A self-constituting narrative is the basis for identity, and contra reductionism, the ontological primitive of a person. As a dynamic valuational and intentional system, the narrative meaningfully constructs the autobiographical past through memory and both causally directs and emotively anticipates the experiences and form of future (...)
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  3. Lenore Langsdorf, Stephen H. Watson & E. Marya Bower (eds.) (1996). Phenomenology, Interpretation, and Community. State University of New York Press.score: 30.0
    This collection examines the relationship between phenomenology, interpretation, and community, considering the issues from several viewpoints including German idealism, the discourses of the Frankfurt School, and post-structuralist thought.
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  4. E. Marya Bower, Thomas M. Seebohm, Dagfinn Follesdal, Jitendra Nath Mohanty, Lee Hardy & Lester Embree (1993). Phenomenology and the Formal Sciences.Phenomenology of Natural Science. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):574.score: 30.0
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  5. Arleen B. Dallery, Stephen H. Watson & E. Marya Bower (1995). Leonard Angel, Enlightenment East and West, State University of New A. J. Bahm, Computocracy: Our New Political Philosophy Its Time Has Georges Bataille, On Nietzsche, Bruce Boone Trans., Sylvere Lotringer, Seyla Benhabib, Wolfgang Bonss, John McCole, Eds., On Max Andrew Benjamin, The Plural Event: Descartes, Hegel, Heidegger. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 26 (1&2):0026-1.score: 30.0
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  6. Arleen B. Dallery, Stephen H. Watson & E. Marya Bower (eds.) (1994). Transitions in Continental Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 30.0
    Twenty papers from a conference in Villanova, Pennsylvania discuss the politics, psychoanalysis and feminist theory, aesthetics, and ethics of phenomenology and existentialism in North America, from its beginnings in the 1940s to its ...
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  7. Lynne Rudder Baker (2005). When Does a Person Begin? Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):25-48.score: 24.0
    According to the Constitution View of persons, a human person is wholly constituted by (but not identical to) a human organism. This view does justice both to our similarities to other animals and to our uniqueness. As a proponent of the Constitution View, I defend the thesis that the coming-into-existence of a human person is not simply a matter of the coming-into-existence of an organism, even if that organism ultimately comes to constitute a person. Marshalling some support from developmental psychology, (...)
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  8. Ruth E. Groenhout & Marya Bower (eds.) (2003). Philosophy, Feminism, and Faith. Indiana University Press.score: 24.0
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  9. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2005). Mary Mary au Contraire: Reply to Raffman. Philosophical Studies 122 (2):203-12.score: 12.0
               Diana Raffman (in press) emphasizes a useful and important distinction that deserves heed in discussions of phenomenal consciousness: the distinction between what it’s like to see red and how red things look. (Two alternative locutions that also can express the latter idea, we take it, are ‘what red looks like’ and ‘what red is like’.) Raffman plausibly argues that this distinction should be incorporated into theories of phenomenal consciousness, including (...)
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