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  1. E. T. Gendlin (2012). The Time of the Explicating Process. In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins Publishing Company.
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  2. K. Atkins, M. Calarco, E. S. Casey, N. Depraz, D. J. Dwyer, E. T. Gendlin, R. Gibbs, P. A. Y. Gunter, S. Hendley & J. Mullarkey (2004). Al-Saji, A., 203. Continental Philosophy Review 37:517.
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  3. E. T. Gendlin (2004). The New Phenomenology of Carrying Forward. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (1):127-151.
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  4. E. T. Gendlin (1997). The Responsive Order: A New Empiricism. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (3):383-411.
    The uniqueness of logic is upheld and contrasted with twenty roles of a wider responsive order that includes us and our procedures. Empirical responses are precise, but different in different approaches. Procedures and findings are independent of (not separable from) their concepts. Two-way feedback obviates a top-down derivation of findings from assumptions, hypotheses, history, or language. The postmodern problems of interpretation, conditions of appearances and relativism involve the ancient error of making perception the model-instance of experience. Instead, bodily interaction functions (...)
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  5. E. T. Gendlin (1995). Crossing and Dipping: Some Terms for Approaching the Interface Between Natural Understanding and Logical Formulation. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (4):547-560.
    Gendlin proposes experiential concepts as bridges between phenomenology and logical formulation. His method moves back and forth, aiming to increase both natural understanding and logical formulation. On thesubjective side, the concepts requiredirect reference tofelt orimplicit meaning. There is no equivalence between this and the logical side. Rather, in logical explication, the implicit iscarried forward, a relation shown by many functions. The subjective is no inner parallel. It performsspecific functions in language. Once these are located, they also lead to developments on (...)
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  6. E. T. Gendlin (1994). Response. Human Studies 17 (3):381-400.
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  7. Jerald Wạllulis & E. T. Gendlin (1994). The Complexity of Bodily Feeling [with Response]. Human Studies 17 (3):373 - 400.
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  8. E. T. Gendlin (1992). The Primacy of the Body, Not the Primacy of Perception. Man and World 25 (3-4):341-353.
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  9. E. T. Gendlin & Herbert G. Reid (1979). Short Reviews. Human Studies 2 (1):86-94.
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  10. E. T. Gendlin (1976). What Are the Grounds of Explication? A Basic Problem in Linguistic Analysis and in Phenomenology. In Harold A. Durfee (ed.), Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Nijhoff. 243--267.
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  11. W. Ross Ashby & E. T. Gendlin (1968). Book Review Section: The Making and Cure of Human Personality. [REVIEW] World Futures 7 (1):83-91.
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