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  1. D. Blondeau, M. Lavoie, P. Valois, E. W. Keyserlingk, M. Hébert & I. Martineau (2000). The Attitude of Canadian Nurses Towards Advance Directives. Nursing Ethics 7 (5):399-411.
    This article seeks to shed light on the beliefs that influence nurses’ intention of respecting or not respecting an advance directive document, namely a living will or a durable power of attorney. Nurses’ beliefs were measured using a 44-statement questionnaire. The sample was made up of 306 nurses working either in a long-term care centre or in a hospital centre offering general and specialized care in the province of Québec. The results indicate that nurses have a strong intention of complying (...)
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  2. D. Blondeau, P. Valois, E. W. Keyserlingk, M. Hebert & M. Lavoie (1998). Comparison of Patients' and Health Care Professionals' Attitudes Towards Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):328-335.
    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify and compare the attitudes of patients and health care professionals towards advance directives. Advance directives promote recognition of the patient's autonomy, letting the individual exercise a certain measure of control over life-sustaining care and treatment in the eventuality of becoming incompetent. DESIGN: Attitudes to advance directives were evaluated using a 44-item self-reported questionnaire. It yields an overall score as well as five factor scores: autonomy, beneficence, justice, external norms, and the affective dimension. SETTING: (...)
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  3. E. W. Keyserlingk (1993). Ethics Codes and Guidelines for Health Care and Research: Can Respect for Autonomy Be a Multi-Cultural Principle. In Earl R. Winkler & Jerrold R. Coombs (eds.), Applied Ethics: A Reader. Blackwell. 319--415.
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  4. E. W. Keyserlingk (1986). Against Infanticide. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):154-157.
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  5. E. W. Keyserlingk (1981). Doing Ethics and Reforming Health Law—A Canadian Experience. Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):73-90.
    This paper will begin with a brief account of the mandate and description of the Law Reform Commission of Canada and its Protection of Life Project, secondly, point to a limitation imposed upon it by the nature of health law in Canada and, thirdly propose some basic questions which such commissions have both the luxury and the duty to wrestle with and resolve. In my view it is these fundamental challenges which ought to be the major components of the standards (...)
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