Search results for 'EJ Olsson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Luc Bovens & EJ Olsson (2000). Coherentism, Reliability and Bayesian Networks. Mind 109 (436):685-719.score: 240.0
    The coherentist theory of justification provides a response to the sceptical challenge: even though the independent processes by which we gather information about the world may be of dubious quality, the internal coherence of the information provides the justification for our empirical beliefs. This central canon of the coherence theory of justification is tested within the framework of Bayesian networks, which is a theory of probabilistic reasoning in artificial intelligence. We interpret the independence of the information gathering processes (IGPs) in (...)
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  2. Aron Vallinder & Erik J. Olsson (2013). Do Computer Simulations Support the Argument From Disagreement? Synthese 190 (8):1437-1454.score: 60.0
    According to the Argument from Disagreement (AD) widespread and persistent disagreement on ethical issues indicates that our moral opinions are not influenced by moral facts, either because there are no such facts or because there are such facts but they fail to influence our moral opinions. In an innovative paper, Gustafsson and Peterson (Synthese, published online 16 October, 2010) study the argument by means of computer simulation of opinion dynamics, relying on the well-known model of Hegselmann and Krause (J Artif (...)
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  3. Erik J. Olsson (2005). Against Coherence: Truth, Probability, and Justification. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    It is tempting to think that, if a person's beliefs are coherent, they are also likely to be true. This truth conduciveness claim is the cornerstone of the popular coherence theory of knowledge and justification. Erik Olsson's new book is the most extensive and detailed study of coherence and probable truth to date. Setting new standards of precision and clarity, Olsson argues that the value of coherence has been widely overestimated. Provocative and readable, Against Coherence will make stimulating (...)
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  4. Erik J. Olsson & Stefan Schubert (2007). Reliability Conducive Measures of Coherence. Synthese 157 (3):297 - 308.score: 60.0
    A measure of coherence is said to be truth conducive if and only if a higher degree of coherence (as measured) results in a higher likelihood of truth. Recent impossibility results strongly indicate that there are no (non-trivial) probabilistic coherence measures that are truth conducive. Indeed, this holds even if truth conduciveness is understood in a weak ceteris paribus sense (Bovens & Hartmann, 2003, Bayesian epistemology. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press; Olsson, 2005, Against coherence: Truth probability and justification. (...)
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  5. Erik J. Olsson (2009). In Defense of the Conditional Probability Solution to the Swamping Problem. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):93-114.score: 60.0
    Knowledge is more valuable than mere true belief. Many authors contend, however, that reliabilism is incompatible with this item of common sense. If a belief is true, adding that it was reliably produced doesn't seem to make it more valuable. The value of reliability is swamped by the value of truth. In Goldman and Olsson (2009), two independent solutions to the problem were suggested. According to the conditional probability solution, reliabilist knowledge is more valuable in virtue of being a (...)
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  6. Erik J. Olsson & Martin L. Jönsson (2011). Kinds of Learning and the Likelihood of Future True Beliefs: Reply to Jäger on Reliabilism and the Value Problem. Theoria 77 (3):214-222.score: 60.0
    We reply to Christoph Jäger's criticism of the conditional probability solution (CPS) to the value problem for reliabilism due to Goldman and Olsson (2009). We argue that while Jäger raises some legitimate concerns about the compatibility of CPS with externalist epistemology, his objections do not in the end reduce the plausibility of that solution.
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  7. Gunnar Olsson (2007). Abysmal: A Critique of Cartographic Reason. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    People rely on reason to think about and navigate the abstract world of human relations in much the same way they rely on maps to study and traverse the physical world. Starting from that simple observation, renowned geographer Gunnar Olsson offers in Abysmal an astonishingly erudite critique of the way human thought and action have become deeply immersed in the rhetoric of cartography and how this cartographic reasoning allows the powerful to map out other people’s lives. A spectacular reading (...)
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  8. Erik J. Olsson (2002). Corroborating Testimony and Ignorance: A Reply to Bovens, Fitelson, Hartmann and Snyder. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):565-572.score: 60.0
    In an earlier paper, I objected to certain elements of L. Jonathan Cohen's account of corroborating testimony (Olsson [2002]). In their response to my article, Bovens, Fitelson, Hartmann and Snyder ([2002]) suggest some significant improvements of the probabilistic model which I used in assessing Cohen's theses and answer some additional questions which my study raised. More problematically, they also seek to defend Cohen against my criticism. I argue, in this reply, that their attempts in this direction are unsuccessful.
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  9. Petter Johansson, Lars Hall, Sverker Sikstrom & Andreas Olsson (2005). Failure to Detect Mismatches Between Intention and Outcome in a Simple Decision Task. Science 310:116-119.score: 30.0
    A fundamental assumption of theories of decision-making is that we detect mismatches between intention and outcome, adjust our behavior in the face of error, and adapt to changing circumstances. Is this always the case? We investigated the relation between intention, choice, and introspection. Participants made choices between presented face pairs on the basis of attractiveness, while we covertly manipulated the relationship between choice and outcome that they experienced. Participants failed to notice conspicuous mismatches between their intended choice and the outcome (...)
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  10. Alvin I. Goldman & Erik J. Olsson (2009). ``Reliabilism and the Value of Knowledge&Quot. In A. Haddock, A. Millar & D. H. Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 19--41.score: 30.0
    It is a widely accepted doctrine in epistemology that knowledge has greater value than mere true belief. But although epistemologists regularly pay homage to this doctrine, evidence for it is shaky. Is it based on evidence that ordinary people on the street make evaluative comparisons of knowledge and true belief, and consistently rate the former ahead of the latter? Do they reveal such a preference by some sort of persistent choice behavior? Neither of these scenarios is observed. Rather, epistemologists come (...)
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  11. Erik J. Olsson (2002). What is the Problem of Coherence and Truth? Journal of Philosophy 99 (5):246-272.score: 30.0
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  12. Erik Carlson & Erik J. Olsson (2001). The Presumption of Nothingness. Ratio 14 (3):203–221.score: 30.0
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  13. Erik J. Olsson (2008). Knowledge, Truth, and Bullshit: Reflections on Frankfurt. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):94-110.score: 30.0
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  14. Erik J. Olsson (2011). Reply to Kvanvig on the Swamping Problem. Social Epistemology 25 (2):173 - 182.score: 30.0
    According to the so?called swamping problem, reliabilist knowledge is no more valuable than mere true belief. In a paper called ?Reliabilism and the value of knowledge? (in Epistemic value, edited by A. Haddock, A. Millar, and D. H. Pritchard, pp. 19?41. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), Alvin I. Goldman and myself proposed, among other things, a solution based on conditional probabilities. This approach, however, is heavily criticized by Jonathan L. Kvanvig in his paper ?The swamping problem redux: Pith and gist? (...)
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  15. Erik J. Olsson (2011). The Value of Knowledge. Philosophy Compass 6 (12):874-883.score: 30.0
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  16. Stefan Schubert & Erik J. Olsson (2012). On the Coherence of Higher-Order Beliefs. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (1):112-135.score: 30.0
    Let us by ‘first-order beliefs’ mean beliefs about the world, such as the belief that it will rain tomorrow, and by ‘second-order beliefs’ let us mean beliefs about the reliability of first-order, belief-forming processes. In formal epistemology, coherence has been studied, with much ingenuity and precision, for sets of first-order beliefs. However, to the best of our knowledge, sets including second-order beliefs have not yet received serious attention in that literature. In informal epistemology, by contrast, sets of the latter kind (...)
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  17. Erik J. Olsson (2005). Not Giving the Skeptic a Hearing: Pragmatism and Radical Doubt. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):98–126.score: 30.0
    Pragmatist responses to radical skepticism do not receive much attention in contemporary analytic epistemology. This observation is my motivation for undertaking a search for a coherent pragmatist reply to radical doubt, one that can compete, in terms of clarity and sophistication, with the currently most popular approaches, such as contextualism and relevant alternatives theory. As my point of departure I take the texts of C. S. Peirce and William James. The Jamesian response is seen to consist in the application of (...)
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  18. Julien Dutant & Erik J. Olsson (2013). Is There a Statistical Solution to the Generality Problem? Erkenntnis 78 (6):1347-1365.score: 30.0
    This article is concerned with a statistical proposal due to James R. Beebe for how to solve the generality problem for process reliabilism. The proposal is highlighted by Alvin I. Goldman as an interesting candidate solution. However, Goldman raises the worry that the proposal may not always yield a determinate result. We address this worry by proving a dilemma: either the statistical approach does not yield a determinate result or it leads to trivialization, i.e. reliability collapses into truth (and anti-reliability (...)
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  19. Erik J. Olsson & Aron Vallinder (2013). Norms of Assertion and Communication in Social Networks. Synthese 190 (13):2557-2571.score: 30.0
    Epistemologists can be divided into two camps: those who think that nothing short of certainty or (subjective) probability 1 can warrant assertion and those who disagree with this claim. This paper addressed this issue by inquiring into the problem of setting the probability threshold required for assertion in such a way that that the social epistemic good is maximized, where the latter is taken to be the veritistic value in the sense of Goldman (Knowledge in a social world, 1999). We (...)
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  20. Sven Ove Hansson & Erik J. Olsson (1999). Providing Foundations for Coherentism. Erkenntnis 51 (2-3):243-265.score: 30.0
    We prove that four theses commonly associated with coherentism are incompatible with the representation of a belief state as a logically closed set of sentences. The result is applied to the conventional coherence interpretation of the AGM theory of belief revision, which appears not to be tenable. Our argument also counts against the coherentistic acceptability of a certain form of propositional holism. We argue that the problems arise as an effect of ignoring the distinction between derived and non-derived beliefs, and (...)
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  21. Vonne Lund & I. Anna S. Olsson (2006). Animal Agriculture: Symbiosis, Culture, or Ethical Conflict? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):47-56.score: 30.0
    Several writers on animal ethics defend the abolition of most or all animal agriculture, which they consider an unethical exploitation of sentient non-human animals. However, animal agriculture can also be seen as a co-evolution over thousands of years, that has affected biology and behavior on the one hand, and quality of life of humans and domestic animals on the other. Furthermore, animals are important in sustainable agriculture. They can increase efficiency by their ability to transform materials unsuitable for human consumption (...)
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  22. Erik J. Olsson (2001). Why Coherence is Not Truth-Conducive. Analysis 61 (271):236–241.score: 30.0
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  23. Erik J. Olsson (1997). Coherence and the Modularity of Mind. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):404-11.score: 30.0
  24. Gunnar Olsson (1975). Birds in Egg. Dept. Of Geography, University of Michigan.score: 30.0
    Utg. 1975 som: Michigan geographical publication ; 15.
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  25. Erik J. Olsson (ed.) (2003). The Epistemology of Keith Lehrer. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 30.0
    Keith Lehrer is one of the leading proponents of a coherence theory of knowledge that seeks to explain what it means to know in a characteristically human way. Central to his account are the pivotal role played by a principle of self-trust and his insistence that a sound epistemology must ultimately be ecumenical in nature, combining elements of internalism and externalism. The present book is an extensive, self-contained, up-to-date study of Lehrer's epistemological work. Covering all major aspects, it contains original (...)
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  26. Erik J. Olsson (2002). Corroborating Testimony, Probability and Surprise. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):273-288.score: 30.0
    Jonathan Cohen has claimed that in cases of witness agreement there is an inverse relationship between the prior probability and the posterior probability of what is being agreed: the posterior rises as the prior falls. As is demonstrated in this paper, this contention is not generally valid. In fact, in the most straightforward case exactly the opposite is true: a lower prior also means a lower posterior. This notwithstanding, there is a grain of truth to what Cohen is saying, as (...)
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  27. Gunnar Olsson (1998). Towards a Critique of Cartographical Reason. Philosophy and Geography 1 (2):145 – 155.score: 30.0
    This paper asks how we find our way in the hitherto unknown. In search of an answer, the author returns to the three Critiques of Immanuel Kant, noting especially their grounding in the geometric mode of (re)presentation and the thingification processes connected therewith. It is argued that Kant's choice of metaphors in effect makes him more of a geographer than of a philosopher. To understand the taken-for-granted of thought-and-action, the time has therefore come for the writing of a fourth volume (...)
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  28. Erik J. Olsson (2005). The Impossibility of Coherence. Erkenntnis 63 (3):387 - 412.score: 30.0
    There is an emerging consensus in the literature on probabilistic coherence that such coherence cannot be truth conducive unless the information sources providing the cohering information are individually credible and collectively independent. Furthermore, coherence can at best be truth conducive in a ceteris paribus sense. Bovens and Hartmann have argued that there cannot be any measure of coherence that is truth conducive even in this very weak sense. In this paper, I give an alternative impossibility proof. I provide a relatively (...)
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  29. Erik J. Olsson (1998). In Defense of Pure Reason: A Rationalist Account of A Priori Justification. Erkenntnis 49 (2):243-249.score: 30.0
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  30. Erik J. Olsson (2007). Reliabilism, Stability, and the Value of Knowledge. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):343 - 355.score: 30.0
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  31. Uwe Hoßfeld & Lennart Olsson (2003). The Road From Haeckel: The Jena Tradition in Evolutionary Morphology and the Origins of “Evo-Devo”. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):285-307.score: 30.0
    With Carl Gegenbaur and Ernst Haeckel, inspiredby Darwin and the cell theory, comparativeanatomy and embryology became established andflourished in Jena. This tradition wascontinued and developed further with new ideasand methods devised by some of Haeckelsstudents. This first period of innovative workin evolutionary morphology was followed byperiods of crisis and even a disintegration ofthe discipline in the early twentieth century.This stagnation was caused by a lack ofinterest among morphologists in Mendeliangenetics, and uncertainty about the mechanismsof evolution. Idealistic morphology was stillinfluental in (...)
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  32. Erik J. Olsson (2003). Foundations of Bayesianism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):521-525.score: 30.0
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  33. Thomas S. Popkewitz, Ulf Olsson & Kenneth Petersson (2006). The Learning Society, the Unfinished Cosmopolitan, and Governing Education, Public Health and Crime Prevention at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (4):431–449.score: 30.0
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  34. Luc Bovens & Erik J. Olsson (2002). Believing More, Risking Less: On Coherence, Truth and Non-Trivial Extensions. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 57 (2):137 - 150.score: 30.0
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  35. Erik J. Olsson (ed.) (2006). Knowledge and Inquiry: Essays on the Pragmatism of Isaac Levi. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Isaac Levi, currently John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, has explored the principles of American pragmatism in greater depth and more consistency than others before him. The result is a sophisticated and powerful philosophical system whose key elements stand in stark opposition not only to current mainstream epistemology, but also to the positions of other contemporary authors writing in the same pragmatist tradition. The essays in this timely volume, written by some of philosophy's finest scholars, contribute substantially (...)
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  36. I. Anna S. Olsson, Christian Gamborg & Peter Sandøe (2006). Taking Ethics Into Account in Farm Animal Breeding: What Can the Breeding Companies Achieve? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):37-46.score: 30.0
    Animal welfare and the ethical issues it raises have been discussed intensively for a couple of decades. The emphasis has been on the direct effects of housing and husbandry, but more attention is now being given to problems originating in selective breeding. European attempts to adjust animal welfare legislation to deal with these problems have been largely unsuccessful, but the fact that selective breeding can introduce welfare problems continues to place an ethical responsibility on the animal breeding industry. Since breeding (...)
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  37. Georg Stenberg, Magnus Lindgren, Mikael Johansson, Andreas Olsson & Ingmar Rosén (2000). Semantic Processing Without Conscious Identification: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (4):973-1004.score: 30.0
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  38. Henry Brighton & Henrik Olsson (2009). Identifying the Optimal Response is Not a Necessary Step Toward Explaining Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):85-86.score: 30.0
  39. Erik J. Olsson (2005). Review of Bede Rundle, Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (3).score: 30.0
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  40. Erik J. Olsson (2003). Belief Revision, Rational Choice and the Unity of Reason. Studia Logica 73 (2):219 - 240.score: 30.0
    Hans Rott has argued, most recently in his book Change, Choice and Inference, that certain formal correspondences between belief revision and rational choice have important philosophical implications, claiming that the former strongly indicate the unity of practical and theoretical reason as well as the primacy of practical reason. In this paper, I confront Rott's argument with three serious challenges. My conclusion is that, while Rott's work is indisputable as a formal achievement, the philosophical consequences he wants to draw are not (...)
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  41. Erik J. Olsson (1999). Cohering With. Erkenntnis 50 (2-3):273 - 291.score: 30.0
    I argue that the analysis most capable of systematising our intuitions about coherence as a relation is one according to which a set of beliefs, A, coheres with another set, B, if and only if the set-theoretical union of A and B is a coherent set. The second problem I consider is the role of coherence in epistemic justification. I submit that there are severe problems pertaining to the idea, defended most prominently by Keith Lehrer, that justification amounts to coherence (...)
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  42. Jesper Olsson (2011). From Beyond the Grave: The Life and Death of the Avant-Garde. Mikkel Bolt: Avantgardens Selvmord. Copenhagen: 28/6, 2009. 109 Pp. Isbn 978-87-92529-03-9. [REVIEW] Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).score: 30.0
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  43. Erik Carlson & Erik J. Olsson (1998). Is Our Existence in Need of Further Explanation? Inquiry 41 (3):255 – 275.score: 30.0
    Several philosophers have argued that our cosmos is either purposely created by some rational being(s), or else just one among a vast number of actually existing cosmoi. According to John Leslie and Peter van Inwagen, the existence of a cosmos containing rational beings is analogous to drawing the winning straw among millions of straws. The best explanation in the latter case, they maintain, is that the drawing was either rigged by someone, or else many such lotteries have taken place. Arnold (...)
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  44. Erick J. Olsson (1998). Making Beliefs Coherentl. The Subtraction and Addition Strategies. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 7 (2):143-163.score: 30.0
    The notion of epistemic coherence is interpreted as involving not only consistency but also stability. The problem how to consolidate a belief system, i.e., revise it so that it becomes coherent, is studied axiomatically as well as in terms of set-theoretical constructions. Representation theorems are given for subtractive consolidation (where coherence is obtained by deleting beliefs) and additive consolidation (where coherence is obtained by adding beliefs).
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  45. Carlo Proietti & Erik J. Olsson (2014). A DDL Approach to Pluralistic Ignorance and Collective Belief. Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (2-3):499-515.score: 30.0
    A group is in a state of pluralistic ignorance (PI) if, roughly speaking, every member of the group thinks that his or her belief or desire is different from the beliefs or desires of the other members of the group. PI has been invoked to explain many otherwise puzzling phenomena in social psychology. The main purpose of this article is to shed light on the nature of PI states – their structure, internal consistency and opacity – using the formal apparatus (...)
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  46. Erik J. Olsson (2003). Avoiding Epistemic Hell: Levi on Pragmatism and Inconsistency. Synthese 135 (1):119 - 140.score: 30.0
    Isaac Levi has claimed that our reliance on the testimony of others, and on the testimony of the senses, commonly produces inconsistency in our set of full beliefs. This happens if what is reported is inconsistent with what we believe to be the case. Drawing on a conception of the role of beliefs in inquiry going back to Dewey, Levi has maintained that the inconsistent belief corpus is a state of ``epistemic hell'': it is useless as a basis for inquiry (...)
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  47. Erik J. Olsson (forthcoming). Gettier and the Method of Explication: A 60 Year Old Solution to a 50 Year Old Problem. Philosophical Studies:1-16.score: 30.0
    I challenge a cornerstone of the Gettier debate: that a proposed analysis of the concept of knowledge is inadequate unless it entails that people don’t know in Gettier cases. I do so from the perspective of Carnap’s methodology of explication. It turns out that the Gettier problem per se is not a fatal problem for any account of knowledge, thus understood. It all depends on how the account fares regarding other putative counter examples and the further Carnapian desiderata of exactness, (...)
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  48. Erik J. Olsson (2007). Guest Editor's Introduction. Studia Logica 157 (3):165-166.score: 30.0
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  49. Erik J. Olsson (2004). F. P. Ramsey on Knowledge and Fallibilism. Dialectica 58 (4):549–557.score: 30.0
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  50. Erik J. Olsson (2008). Klein on the Unity of Cartesian and Contemporary Skepticism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):511–524.score: 30.0
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