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  1. Earl E. Shelp (1984). The Experience of Illness: Integrating Metaphors and the Transcendence of Illness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (3):253-256.
  2. Earl E. Shelp (1983). Courage and Tragedy in Clinical Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):417-429.
    The relationship between medical clinicians and patients is described as potentially tragic in nature and a context in which courage can be a relevant virtue. Danger, risk, uncertainty, and choice are presented as features of clinical relationships that also function as necessary conditions for courage. The clinician is seen as a ‘sustaining presence’ who has duties of ‘encouragement’ with respect to patients. The patient is seen to have a duty to learn the condition of human existence which can be discovered (...)
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  3. Earl E. Shelp (1983). Foreword. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (1).
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  4. Eugene V. Boisaubin & Earl E. Shelp (1981). A Police Informer in a Hospital Bed. Hastings Center Report 11 (5):17-18.
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