Search results for 'Earth sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Robert Frodeman & Victor R. Baker (eds.) (2000). Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy, and the Claims of Community. Prentice Hall.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. G. Kelinhans Maarten, J. J. Buskes Chris & W. De Regt Henk (2010). Philosophy of the Natural Sciences: Philosophy of Physics / Richard DeWitt. Philosophy of Chemistry / Joachim Schummer. Philosophy of Biology / Matthew H. Haber ... [Et Al.]. Philosophy of Earth Science. [REVIEW] In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 93.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Maeve Boland (2001). Robert Frodeman (Ed), Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy, and the Claims of Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):88-93.score: 90.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Trish Glazebrook (2001). Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy, and the Claims of Community. Environmental Ethics 23 (2):215-218.score: 90.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Erik Fisher (2005). Geo-Logic: Breaking Ground Between Philosophy and the Earth Sciences. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):97-100.score: 87.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Carl Mitcham (2000). Earth Religions, Earth Sciences, Earth Philosophies. In Robert Frodeman & Victor R. Baker (eds.), Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy, and the Claims of Community. Prentice Hall. 1--152.score: 87.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 76.0
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and social institutions, on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.0
    This volume is a unique contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences, presenting the results of cutting-edge philosophers' research alongside critical discussions by practicing social scientists. The book is motivated by the view that the philosophy of the social sciences cannot ignore the specific scientific practices according to which social scientific work is being conducted, and that it will be valuable only if it evolves in constant interaction with theoretical developments in the social sciences. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Mark J. Smith (ed.) (2005). Philosophy & Methodology of the Social Sciences. Sage.score: 76.0
    This is a comprehensive and authoritative reference collection in the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences. The source materials selected are drawn from debates within the natural sciences as well as social scientific practice. This four volume set covers the traditional literature on the philosophy of the social sciences, and the contemporary philosophical and methodological debates developing at the heart of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary groups in the social sciences. It addresses the needs (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Yam San Chee (2014). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):89-103.score: 75.0
    Design research has been positioned as an important methodological contribution of the learning sciences. Despite the publication of a handbook on the subject, the practice of design research in education remains an eclectic collection of specific approaches implemented by different researchers and research groups. In this paper, I examine the learning sciences as a design science to identify its fundamental goals, methods, affiliations, and assumptions. I argue that inherent tensions arise when attempting to practice design research as an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Max Seeger (2010). Experimental Philosophy and the Twin Earth Intuition. Grazer Philosophische Studien 80:237-244.score: 72.0
    Jonathan Weinberg (2007) has argued that we should not appeal to intuition as evidence because it cannot be externally corroborated. This paper argues for the normative claim that Weinberg’s demand for external corroboration is misguided. The idea is that Weinberg goes wrong in treating philosophical appeal to intuition analogous to the appeal to evidence in the sciences. Traditional practice is defended against Weinberg’s critique with the argument that some intuitions are true simply in virtue of being intuited by the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 72.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Charles Taylor (1985). Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Cormac Cullinan (2011). Wild Law: A Manifesto for Earth Justice. Chelsea Green Pub..score: 70.0
    Anthills and aardvarks -- The illusion of independence -- The myth of the master species -- Why law and jurisprudence matter -- The conceit of law -- Respecting the great law -- Remembering who we are -- The question of rights -- Elements of Earth governance -- Seeking Earth jurisprudence -- The rhythms of life -- The law of the land -- A communion of communities -- Transforming law and governance -- The mountain path.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.) (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub..score: 67.0
    Presents a collection of essays that cover a variety of issues in the social sciences.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Cormac Cullinan (2002). Wild Law: Governing People for Earth. [Distributed by] Thorold's Africana Books.score: 67.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ian C. Jarvie & Jesus Zamoro Bonilla (eds.) (2011). The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. SAGE.score: 65.0
    In this excting Handbook, Jarvie and Bonilla provide a broad and democratic coverage of the many currents in social science.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. S. I. Benn & G. W. Mortimore (eds.) (1976). Rationality and the Social Sciences: Contributions to the Philosophy and Methodology of the Social Sciences. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 64.0
  19. Robert Bishop (2007). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences: An Introduction. Continuum.score: 64.0
  20. Len Doyal (1986). Empiricism, Explanation, and Rationality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 64.0
  21. Antony Flew (1985). Thinking About Social Thinking: The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell.score: 64.0
  22. Robert Flint (1904/1975). Philosophy as Scientia Scientiarum: And, a History of Classifications of the Sciences. Arno Press.score: 64.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. I. C. Jarvie, Zamora Bonilla & P. Jesús (eds.) (2011). The Sage Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Sage.score: 64.0
  24. Peter T. Manicas (1987). A History and Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Basil Blackwell.score: 64.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Maurice Alexander Natanson (1963). Philosophy of the Social Sciences. New York, Random House.score: 64.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Vernon Pratt (1978). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Methuen.score: 64.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Murray Newton Rothbard (1979). Individualism and the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cato Institute.score: 64.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Alan Ryan (1970). The Philosophy of the Social Sciences. London,Macmillan.score: 64.0
  29. John W. Sutherland (1973). A General Systems Philosophy for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. New York,Braziller.score: 64.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. G. M. N. Verschuuren (1986). Investigating the Life Sciences: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Pergamon Press.score: 64.0
  31. Keith Webb (1995). An Introduction to Problems in the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Pinter.score: 64.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 62.3
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...) (HPLS). The project focuses on the study and use of descriptions, observations, experiments, and recording techniques used by early microscopists to classify various species of water flea. The first published illustrations and descriptions of the water flea were included in the Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam’s, Historia Insectorum Generalis (1669) (Algemeene verhandeling van de bloedeloose dierkens. t’Utrrecht, Meinardus van Dreunen, ordinaris Drucker van d’Academie). After studying these, we first used the descriptions, techniques, and nomenclature recovered to observe, record, and classify the specimens collected from our university ponds. We then used updated recording techniques and image-based keys to observe and identify the specimens. The implementation of these newer techniques was guided in part by the observations and records that resulted from our use of the recovered historical methods of investigation. The series of HPLS labs constructed as part of this interdisciplinary project provided a space for students to consider and wrestle with the many philosophical issues that arise in the process of identifying an unknown organism and offered unique learning opportunities that engaged students’ curiosity and critical thinking skills. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Christopher Hookway & Philip Pettit (eds.) (1977). Action and Interpretation: Studies in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 61.3
    Whether the interpretations made by social scientists of the thoughts, utterances and actions of other people, including those from an alien culture or a ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. William Whewell (1967). The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences. London, Cass.score: 61.3
    THE PHILOSOPHY OF THe INDUCTIVE SCIENCES. PART II. OF KNOWLEDGE. ' . VOL. II. ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ray Harbaugh Dotterer (1929/1971). Philosophy by Way of the Sciences. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 61.3
    PHILOSOPHY BY WAY OF THE SCIENCES CHAPTER I PHILOSOPHY AND THE SCIENCES The Science of Things in General. — It is usually a little difficult to give the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Editor's Introduction. In Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.), Why does history matter to philosophy and the sciences? De Gruyter.score: 60.0
  37. Alban Bouvier (2004). Individual Beliefs and Collective Beliefs in Sciences and Philosophy: The Plural Subject and the Polyphonic Subject Accounts: Case Studies. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (3):382-407.score: 60.0
    The issue of knowing what it means for a group to have collective beliefs is being discussed more and more in contemporary philosophy of the social sciences and philosophy of mind. Margaret Gilbert’s reconsideration of Durkheim’s viewpoint in the framework of the plural subject’s account is one of the most famous. This has implications in the history and the sociology of science—as well asin the history and sociology of philosophy—although Gilbert only outlined them in the former (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alex Rosenberg (2005). Lessons From Biology for Philosophy of the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):3-19.score: 60.0
    The social sciences must be biological ones, owing simply to the fact that they focus on the causes and effects of the behavior of members of a biological species, Homo sapiens. Our improved understanding of biology as a science and of the biological realm should enable us therefore to solve several of the outstanding problems of the philosophy of social science. The solution to these problems leaves most of the social and behavioral sciences pretty much as it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Philip Mirowski (2004). The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.score: 60.0
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge‘ is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy‘ are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stefan Schubert (2012). Ernest Gellner's Use of the Social Sciences in Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences (1):0048393112444319.score: 60.0
    It is well known that Ernest Gellner made substantial use of his knowledge of the social sciences in philosophy. Here I discuss how he used it on the basis of a few examples taken from Gellner’s philosophical output. It is argued that he made a number of highly original “translations”, orre-interpretations, of philosophical theories and problems using his knowledge of the social sciences. While this method is endorsed, it is also argued that some of Gellner’s translations crossed (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. R. J. Anderson (1986). Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 60.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 58.3
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Christopher Minkowski (2008). The Study of Jyotiḥśāstra and the Uses of Philosophy of Science. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (5-6):587-597.score: 58.3
    This is one of a group of essays (collected in this issue of the journal) about methodological considerations that have arisen for the project on the “Sanskrit knowledge systems on the eve of colonialism.” For the history of the exact sciences in Sanskrit, or Jyotiḥśāstra, in the early modern period, there are special problems. These have to do with the historically anomalous status of the exact sciences among the śāstras or Sanskrit knowledge systems, and with the predominantly “internalist” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 58.0
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter T. Manicas (2006). A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 58.0
    This introduction to the philosophy of social science provides an original conception of the task and nature of social inquiry. Peter Manicas discusses the role of causality seen in the physical sciences and offers a reassessment of the problem of explanation from a realist perspective. He argues that the fundamental goal of theory in both the natural and social sciences is not, contrary to widespread opinion, prediction and control, or the explanation of events (including behaviour). Instead, theory (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Peter Winch (2008/2007). The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy. Routledge.score: 58.0
    The problems dealt with in The Idea of a Social Science are philosophical. It is an attempt to place the social science, considered as a single group, on the intellectual map, with special attention to the relations of the discipline to philosophy on the one hand and the natural sciences on the other. The author holds that the relation between the social sciences and philosophy is commonly misunderstood because of certain fashionable misconceptions about the nature of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Noel Castree (2013). Making Sense of Nature. Routledge.score: 58.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Kathryn Dean (ed.) (2006). Realism, Philosophy and Social Science. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 58.0
    The authors examine the nature of the relationship between social science and philosophy and address the sort of work social science should do, and the role and sorts of claims that an accompanying philosophy should engage in. In particular, the authors reintroduce the question of ontology, an area long overlooked by philosophers of social science, and present a cricital engagement with the work of Roy Bhaskar. The book argues against the excesses of philosophising and commits itself to a (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. A. Dubi (2010). Metar Ha-Adam. Ḳidmat ʻeden.score: 58.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Alexander Rosenberg (1995). Philosophy of Social Science. Westview Press.score: 58.0
    This is an expanded and thoroughly revised edition of the widely adopted introduction to the philosophical foundations of the human sciences. Ranging from cultural anthropology to mathematical economics, Alexander Rosenberg leads the reader through behaviorism, naturalism, interpretativism about human action, and macrosocial scientific perspectives, illuminating the motivation and strategy of each.Rewritten throughout to increase accessibility, this new edition retains the remarkable achievement of revealing the social sciences’ enduring relation to the fundamental problems of philosophy. It includes new (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000