Search results for 'Eating (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew C. Halteman (2015). Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments on the Ethics of Eating. Routledge.
    Everyone is talking about food. Chefs are celebrities. "Locavore" and "freegan" have earned spots in the dictionary. Popular books and films about food production and consumption are exposing the unintended consequences of the standard American diet. Questions about the principles and values that ought to guide decisions about dinner have become urgent for moral, ecological, and health-related reasons. In _Philosophy Comes to Dinner_, twelve philosophers—some leading voices, some inspiring new ones—join the conversation, and consider issues ranging from the sustainability of (...)
     
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  2.  20
    Matthew C. Halteman & Megan Halteman Zwart (2016). "Philosophy as Therapy for Recovering (Unrestrained) Omnivores". In Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo, and Matthew C. Halteman, eds., Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments about the Ethics of Eating, New York: Routledge, 2016.
    Recourse to a variety of well-constructed arguments is undoubtedly a significant strategic asset for cultivating more ethical eating habits and convincing others to follow suit. Nevertheless, common obstacles often prevent even the best arguments from getting traction in our lives. For one thing, many of us enter the discussion hampered by firmly-entrenched but largely uninvestigated assumptions about food that make it difficult to imagine how even well-supported arguments that challenge our familiar frames of culinary reference could actually apply to (...)
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  3. Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew Halteman (eds.) (2015). Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments on the Ethics of Eating. Routledge.
    First published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  4. Matthew C. Halteman & Megan Halteman Zwart (eds.) (2016). Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo, and Matthew C. Halteman, Eds., Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments About the Ethics of Eating, New York: Routledge, 2016. Routledge.
    First published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  5.  22
    Leon Kass (1994/1999). The Hungry Soul: Eating and the Perfecting of Our Nature. University of Chicago Press.
    The Hungry Soul is a fascinating exploration of the natural and cultural act of eating. Kass brilliantly reveals how the various aspects of this phenomenon, and the customs, rituals, and taboos surrounding it, relate to universal and profound truths about the human animal and its deepest yearnings. "Kass is a distinguished and graceful writer. . . . It is astonishing to discover how different is our world from that of the animals, even in that which most evidently betrays that (...)
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  6.  4
    Elspeth Probyn (2000). Carnal Appetites: Foodsexidentities. Routledge.
    Why is there a new explosion of interest in authentic ethnic foods and exotic cooking shows, where macho chefs promote sensual adventures in the kitchen? Why do we watch TV ads that promise more sex if we serve the right breakfast cereal? Why is the hunger strike such a potent political tool? Food inevitably engages questions of sensuality and power, of our connections to our bodies and to our world. Carnal Appetites brilliantly uses the lens of food and eating (...)
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  7.  82
    Elizabeth Telfer (1996). Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food. Routledge.
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to say to (...)
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  8.  16
    Daniel Hicks (2013). Paul Pojman (Ed): Food Ethics, Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, Boston, Massachusetts, 2012, 199 Pp, ISBN 9781111772307 David Kaplan (Ed): The Philosophy of Food, University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 2012, 320 Pp, ISBN 9780520269330. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):657-658.
    Both of the books reviewed here are anthologies edited by philosophers, intended for use in undergraduate “ethics of eating” classes taught under the auspices of philosophy departments; I review them as a teacher of such a class. The Pojman anthology is rather outdated, and not recommended. The Kaplan anthology, by contrast, would be a valuable starting point or addition to such a class, though it could not carry the class on its own.
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  9.  3
    Anthony O'Hear (2009). Philosophy – Wisdom or Technique? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):351-.
    Notice the key concepts: wonder, purification of emotion, piercing the blindness of activity, transcendent functions. There are echoes here of the Platonic doctrine of philosophy as the care of the soul, therapy, the turning of the soul from fantasy to reality. Education, says Plato , is the art of orientation, the shedding of the leaden weights which progressively weigh us down as we become more and more sunk in the material world and the world of desire, eating and similar (...)
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  10. G. M. Preobrazhenskiĭ (ed.) (2006). Filosofskie Piry Peterburga: Materialy Konferent͡siĭ 1999 I 2002 Gg., S.-Peterburg. Izd-Vo Spbgu.
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  11. G. M. Preobrazhenskiĭ (ed.) (2006). Filosofskie Piry Peterburga: Materialy Konferent͡siĭ 1999 I 2002 Gg. Izd-Vo Spbgu.
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  12.  40
    Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.
    continent. 1.1 : 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  13.  34
    Julie R. Klein (2003). Nature's Metabolism: On Eating in Derrida, Agamben, and Spinoza. Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):186-217.
    This article studies a series of provocative references to Spinoza by Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben. For both contemporary philosophers, the context is discussions of eating, a subject matter that turns out to involve such central issues as subjectivity, nature, ethics, and teleology. Each situates Spinoza in a counter-history of philosophy and suggests that Spinoza constitutes an important resource for contemporary reflections. Through an analysis of the three philosophers' texts about eating, nutrition, and being metabolized, I argue that (...)
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  14.  42
    R. J. (2003). Nature's Metabolism: On Eating in Derrida, Agamben, and Spinoza. Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):186-217.
    This article studies a series of provocative references to Spinoza by Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben. For both contemporary philosophers, the context is discussions of eating, a subject matter that turns out to involve such central issues as subjectivity, nature, ethics, and teleology. Each situates Spinoza in a counter-history of philosophy and suggests that Spinoza constitutes an important resource for contemporary reflections. Through an analysis of the three philosophers' texts about eating, nutrition, and being metabolized, I argue that (...)
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  15.  4
    Michiel Korthals (2015). Mind Versus Stomach: The Philosophical Meanings of Eating. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):403-406.
    Ray Boisvert has started with his book an ambitious project to rethink the most important disciplines of philosophy from the stomach not from the mind. The stomach comprises an intrinsic connection with nature, people, and everything else that contributes to feeling well. The book presents a sometimes joyous and mostly very serious celebration of what eating can bring us in doing philosophy. The blurb text on the back cover claims: ‘Building on the original meaning of philosophy as love of (...)
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  16.  14
    Simona Giordano (2003). Persecutors or Victims? The Moral Logic at the Heart of Eating Disorders. Health Care Analysis 11 (3):219-228.
    Eating Disorders, particularly anorexia and bulimia, are of immense contemporary importance and interest. News stories depicting the tragic effects of eating disorders command wide attention. Almost everybody in society has been touched by eating disorders in one way or another, and contemporary obsession with body image and diet fuels fascination with this problem. It is unclear why people develop eating disorders. Clinical and sociological studies have provided important information relating to the relational systems in which (...) disorders are mainly found. This paper shows that their explanations are not conclusive and points out that the reasons why people develop eating disorders should not be found in the dysfunctional interactions occurring in both familial and social systems, but in the moral beliefs that underlie these interactions. Eating disorders are impossible to understand or explain, unless they are viewed in the light of these beliefs. A moral logic, that is a way of thinking of interpersonal relations in moral terms, gives shape to and justifies the clinical condition, and finds consistent expression in abnormal eating behaviour. The analysis offered here is not mainstream either in philosophy (eating disorders are in fact seldom the subject of philosophical investigation) or in clinical psychology (the methods of philosophical analysis are in fact seldom utilised in clinical psychology). However, this paper offers a important contribution to the understanding of such a dramatic and widespread condition, bringing to light the deepest reasons, which are moral in nature, that contribute to the explanation of this complex phenomenon. (shrink)
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  17.  39
    Martin Hollis (1996). Reason in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Did Adam and Eve act rationally in eating the fruit of the forbidden tree? That can seem to depend solely on whether they had found the best means to their ends, in the spirit of the 'economic' theories of rationality. Martin Hollis respects the elegance and power of these theories but judges their paradoxes endemic. He argues that social action cannot be understood by viewing human beings as abstract individuals with preferences in search of satisfaction, nor by divorcing practical (...)
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  18.  16
    Deane W. Curtin & Lisa M. Heldke (eds.) (1992). Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food. Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy has often been criticized for privileging the abstract; this volume attempts to remedy that situation. Focusing on one of the most concrete of human concerns, food, the editors argue for the existence of a philosophy of food.
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  19.  3
    Sarah Kathryn Marshall (2015). Eating Well with Pleshette DeArmitt. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):45-49.
    Written from a student’s perspective, this essay focuses on Pleshette’s engagement with Derrida in The Right to Narcissism: The Case for an Im-possible Self-Love and attests to the manner in which she lived this influence through her teaching and writing.
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  20.  6
    Predrag Krstic (2008). Thinking and Devouring: About an Ancient Motif Recently Thematised in Philosophy. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (1):251-274.
    The inspiration or provocation for this paper came from the animal welfare theorists and environmental philosophers who have questioned the justification of our - real and symbolic - practice of eating meat, and from there challenged our meat-eating and generally devouring culture. The author is attempting to examine this motif - a motif of eating, swallowing devouring - its manifestation, display, findings or far-reaching thematisation that have been taking place more or less in passing in the texts (...)
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  21.  4
    José Luis Moreno Pestaña (2008). Merleau-Ponty y el sentido de la enfermedad mental. «La locura en el lugar» o la destrucción de los hábitos compartidos. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 44:143-154.
    Este texto utiliza los análisis sobre la enfermedad mental de Merleau-Ponty para plantearse ciertas preguntas básicas: cuáles son las fronteras entre lo normal y lo patológico, qué tipo de distorsiones introduce la enfermedad mental y en qué ámbitos de la existencia, cómo caracterizar las variaciones de la conducta espaciotemporal a las que nos referimos habitualmente cuando hablamos de enfermedad. Se pone a Merleau-Ponty en diálogo con otros pensadores (señaladamente Erving Goffman) y se articulan sus conceptos respecto de una investigación empírica (...)
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  22.  5
    Michelle Boulous Walker (2002). Eating Ethically. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (2):295-320.
    Emmanuel Levinas’s work on the ethical responsibility of the face-to-face relation offers an illuminating context or clearing within which we might better appreciate the work of Simone Weil. Levinas’s subjectivity of the hostage, the one who is responsible for the other before being responsible for the self, provides us with a way of re-encountering the categories of gravity and grace invoked in Weil’s original account. In this paper I explore the terrain between these thinkers by raising the question of (...) as, in part, an ethical act. Weil’s conception of grace refers to the state of decreation in which the utter humility of the self moves toward a kind of disintegration and weightlessness. This weightlessness, which Weil contrasts to the gravity of terrestrial weight, might be thought of in terms of the subject’s fundamental responsibility for the other, especially in terms of the injunction “Thou shalt neither kill nor take the food of thy neighbour.” Taking the place of the other, taking the food from the mouth of the other, is the ethical dilemma facing the subject as hostage and an elaboration of this situation may provide us with steps toward a radical questioning of anorexia as—at least inpart—an ethical rather than purely medical condition. (shrink)
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  23.  1
    Dennis Rohatyn (ed.) (1997). Philosophy History Sophistry. Rodopi.
    Post-modernism believes in nothing, not even unbelief. Hence it is a genial version of nihilism, and the flip side of despair. Like skepticism , it is healthy insofar as it rejects all dogmas; but unhealthy insofar as it substitutes its own, while eating its own essence. This book diagnoses this disease, and offers irony as its cure. What failure of nerve did to Hellenism, strength of character must do for the decline of the best. Humor, laughter, and detachment are (...)
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  24. Elizabeth Telfer (2004). ‘Animals Do It Too!’: The Franklin Defence of Meat-Eating. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (1):51-67.
    The Franklin defence of meat-eating is the claim that meat-eating is morally permissible because animals eat other animals. I examine five versions of this defence. I argue that two versions, claiming respectively that might is right and that animals deserve to be eaten, can easily be dismissed, and that the version based on a claim that God intends us to eat animals is theologically controversial. I go on to show that the two other versions—one claiming that meat-eating (...)
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  25.  9
    Michael B. Gill (2014). On Eating Animals. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):201-207.
    This essay is a critical response to Loren Lomasky's essay in this volume: “Is It Wrong to Eat Animals?” The essay argues that Lomasky both overestimates the value of eating meat and underestimates the harms to animals of practices surrounding meat eating. While Lomasky takes the fact that an animal would not have lived at all if it were not being raised for food to constitute a benefit for animals being so raised, this essay argues that it would (...)
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  26. Matthew Calarco (2004). Deconstruction is Not Vegetarianism: Humanism, Subjectivity, and Animal Ethics. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):175-201.
    This essay examines Jacques Derrida’s contribution to recent debates in animal philosophy in order to explore the critical promise of his work for contemporary discourses on animal ethics and vegetarianism. The essay is divided into two sections, both of which have as their focus Derrida’s interview with Jean-Luc Nancy entitled “‘Eating Well’, or the Calculation of the Subject.” My task in the initial section is to assess the claim made by Derrida in this interview that Levinas’s work is dogmatically (...)
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  27.  30
    Liza Verhoeven & Leon Horsten (2005). On the Exclusivity Implicature of 'Or' or on the Meaning of Eating Strawberries. Studia Logica 81 (1):19-24.
    This paper is a contribution to the program of constructing formal representations of pragmatic aspects of human reasoning. We propose a formalization within the framework of Adaptive Logics of the exclusivity implicature governing the connective ‘or’.Keywords: exclusivity implicature, Adaptive Logics.
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  28.  67
    Matthew J. Brown (2007). Picky Eating is a Moral Failing. In Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Blackwell
    Common wisdom includes expressions such as “there is no accounting for taste'’ that express a widely-accepted subjectivism about taste. We commonly say things like “I can’t stand anything with onions in it'’ or “Oh, I’d never eat sushi,'’ and we accept such from our friends and associates. It is the position of this essay that much of this language is actually quite unacceptable. Without appealing to complete objectivism about taste, I will argue that there are good reasons to think that (...)
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  29.  12
    Lynn A. Jansen (2004). No Safe Harbor: The Principle of Complicity and the Practice of Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):61 – 74.
    In recent years, a number of writers have proposed voluntary stopping of eating and drinking as an alternative to physician-assisted suicide. This paper calls attention to and discusses some of the ethical complications that surround the practice of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking. The paper argues that voluntary stopping of eating and drinking raises very difficult ethical questions. These questions center on the moral responsibility of clinicians who care for the terminally ill as well as the (...)
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  30.  15
    Michael B. Gill (2013). On Eating Animals. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):201-207.
    This essay is a critical response to Loren Lomasky's essay in this volume: The essay argues that Lomasky both overestimates the value of eating meat and underestimates the harms to animals of practices surrounding meat eating. While Lomasky takes the fact that an animal would not have lived at all if it were not being raised for food to constitute a benefit for animals being so raised, this essay argues that it would be better for animals raised on (...)
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  31.  29
    John Mizzoni (2002). Against Rolston's Defense of Eating Animals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):125-131.
    In his critique of a common argument in favor of vegetarianism, Holmes Rolston III does not sufficiently address the nutritional factor. The nutritional factor is the important fact that the eating of animals is not nutritionally required to sustain human life. Also, although Rolston’s criterion for distinguishing when to model human conduct on animal conduct is defensible, he applies it inconsistently. One reason for this inconsistency is that Rolston misplaces the line he attempts to draw between culture and nature. (...)
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  32.  2
    Liza Verhoeven & Leon Horsten (2005). On the Exclusivity Implicature of ‘Or’ or on the Meaning of Eating Strawberries. Studia Logica 81 (1):19-24.
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  33. Cora Diamond (1978). Eating Meat and Eating People. Philosophy 53 (206):465 - 479.
    This paper is a response to a certain sort of argument defending the rights of animals. Part I is a brief explanation of the background and of the sort of argument I want to reject; Part II is an attempt to characterize those arguments: they contain fundamental confusions about moral relations between people and people and between people and animals. And Part III is an indication of what I think can still be said on—as it were–the animals' side.
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  34.  84
    Andy Lamey (2007). Food Fight! Davis Versus Regan on the Ethics of Eating Beef. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (2):331–348.
    One of the starting assumptions in the debate over the ethical status of animals is that someone who is committed to reducing animal suffering should not eat meat. Steven Davis has recently advanced a novel criticism of this view. He argues that individuals who are committed to reducing animal suffering should not adopt a vegetarian or vegan diet, as Tom Regan an other animal rights advocates claim, but one containing free-range beef. To make his case Davis highlights an overlooked form (...)
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  35. Christina Van Dyke (2008). Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body. In K. J. Clark (ed.) Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2008). 475-489.
  36.  40
    Adrian Wüthrich (2012). Eating Goldstone Bosons in a Phase Transition: A Critical Review of Lyre’s Analysis of the Higgs Mechanism. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (2):281-287.
    In this note, I briefly review Lyre's analysis and interpretation of the Higgs mechanism. Contrary to Lyre, I maintain that, on the proper understanding of the term, the Higgs mechanism refers to a physical process in the course of which gauge bosons acquire a mass. Since also Lyre's worries about imaginary masses can be dismissed, a realistic interpretation of the Higgs mechanism seems viable.
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  37. Leah A. Murray (2006). When They Aren't Eating Us, They Bring Us Together: Zombies and the American Social Contract. In Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.), The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court 211--220.
     
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  38.  69
    Alastair Norcross (2008). Causal Impotence and Eating Meat. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):5-10.
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  39.  33
    Robert E. Allinson (1986). Having Your Cake and Eating It, Too: Evaluation and Trans-Evaluation in Chuang Tzu and Nietzsche. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (4):429-443.
  40.  51
    Älastair Norcross (2004). Torturing Puppies and Eating Meat. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (1):117-123.
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  41.  12
    Mika Lavaque-Manty (2001). Food, Functioning and Justice: From Famines to Eating Disorders. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (2):150–167.
  42.  28
    Rebecca Housel (2013). Eating Your Brain. Philosophy Now 96:15-15.
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  43.  16
    Kenneth F. Rogerson (2002). On the Morality of Eating Animals. Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):105-111.
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  44.  7
    Peter Mottley (1993). Eating People. Philosophy Now 8:20-21.
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  45.  17
    Robert E. Innis (2011). Framing Hunger: Eating and Categories of Self-Development. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 25 (2):184-202.
    Hunger seems, at first glance, to be primarily a biological state, emerging first incipiently and then with insistent, yet extremely varying, sharpness in the wide continuum of sentient and feeling beings. The pervasive lived through, but not necessarily attended to, tonus of somatic well-being is unbalanced by the experience of lack that initiates attempts to restore equilibrium in a cycle that continues until death or its equivalent. Hunger in this sense provokes appetite or appetition. It is satisfied by an appropriate (...)
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  46.  5
    Silvia Camporesi (2014). Simona Giordano, Exercise and Eating Disorders: An Ethical and Legal Analysis. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):216-220.
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  47. John W. Bender (1993). Deane Curtin and Lisa Heldke Eds., Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (6):300-302.
     
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  48.  14
    Pauline C. Lee (2012). “There is Nothing More…Than Dressing and Eating”: Li Zhi 李贄 and the Child-Like Heart-Mind (Tongxin 童心). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):63-81.
    Zhi 李贄, also named ( hao 號) Zhuowu 卓吾 (1527–1602), and argues that he articulates a coherent and compelling vision of a good life focused on the expression of genuine feelings distinctive to each individual. Through a study of literary texts and terms of art he refers to in his critical essay “On the Child-like Heart-mind” ( Tongxin Shuo 童心說), as well as the metaphors and images he fleshes out throughout his writings, I characterize Li’s ethical vision and show that (...)
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  49.  6
    Michael Mack (2001). The Metaphysics of Eating: Jewish Dietary Law and Hegel's Social Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (5):59-88.
    This paper analyzes how 'Jewishness' functions as a scapegoat for the apparently unbridgeable gap between spirit and matter in Hegel's social and aesthetic theory. If Hegel accuses 'the Jews' and 'Judaism' of inhabiting a radical divide between the empirical and the spiritual - a divide that coincides with the one between body and body politic - he follows the trajectory of Kant's opposition between autonomy and heteronomy. Kant's notion of freedom describes reason's transcendence of the material world, but this state (...)
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  50.  3
    Jeremy Bojczuk (1995). Eating People. Philosophy Now 14:28-29.
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