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Profile: Ebrahim Moosa (Duke University)
  1. Aasim I. Padela, Steven W. Furber, Mohammad A. Kholwadia & Ebrahim Moosa (2014). Dire Necessity and Transformation: Entry‐Points for Modern Science in Islamic Bioethical Assessment of Porcine Products in Vaccines. Bioethics 28 (2):59-66.
    The field of medicine provides an important window through which to examine the encounters between religion and science, and between modernity and tradition. While both religion and science consider health to be a ‘good’ that is to be preserved, and promoted, religious and science-based teachings may differ in their conception of what constitutes good health, and how that health is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the way the Islamic ethico-legal tradition assesses the permissibility of using vaccines that contain porcine-derived (...)
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  2. Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa (2013). Brain Death in Islamic Ethico-Legal Deliberation: Challenges for Applied Islamic Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other councils have repudiated the notion (...)
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  3. Ebrahim Moosa (2012). Translating Neuroethics: Reflections From Muslim Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):519-528.
    Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included. Cultural translation involves lived encounters with modernity and its byproduct, modern science. Serious ethical debate requires more (...)
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  4. Ebrahim Moosa (2011). The Spirit of Islamic Humanism. In John de Gruchy (ed.), The Humanist Imperative in South Africa. African Sun Media. 107.
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  5. Ebrahim Moosa (2005). Ghazālī and the Poetics of Imagination. University of North Carolina Press.
    Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, a Muslim jurist-theologian and polymath who lived from the mid-eleventh to the early twelfth century in present-day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judaism and Thomas Aquinas in Christianity. He is best known for his work in philosophy, ethics, law, and mysticism. In an engaged re-reading of the ideas of this preeminent Muslim thinker, Ebrahim Moosa argues that Ghazali's work has lasting relevance today as a model for a critical encounter with the Muslim (...)
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  6. Ebrahim Moosa (2005). Muslim Ethics? In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 237--243.
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