Search results for 'Ecologists' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joel B. Hagen (1986). Ecologists and Taxonomists: Divergent Traditions in Twentieth-Century Plant Geography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):197 - 214.score: 12.0
    The distinction between taxonomic plant geography and ecological plant geography was never absolute: it would be historically inaccurate to portray them as totally divergent. Taxonomists occasionally borrowed ecological concepts, and ecologists never completely repudiated taxonomy. Indeed, some botanists pursued the two types of geographic study. The American taxonomist Henry Allan Gleason (1882–1975), for one, made noteworthy contributions to both. Most of Gleason's research appeared in short articles, however. He never published a major synthetic work comparable in scope or influence (...)
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  2. Peter J. Taylor (1990). Mapping Ecologists' Ecologies of Knowledge. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:95 - 109.score: 12.0
    Ecologists grapple with complex, changing situations. Historians, sociologists and philosophers studying the construction of science likewise attempt to account for (or discount) a wide variety of influences making up the scientists' "ecologies of knowledge." This paper introduces a graphic methodology, mapping, designed to assist researchers at both levels-in science and in science studies-to work with the complexity of their material. By analyzing the implications and limitations of mapping, I aim to contribute to an ecological approach to the philosophy of (...)
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  3. Mary E. Clark (1992). Tasks for Future Ecologists. Environmental Values 1 (1):35 - 46.score: 12.0
    Apparent conflicts between human jobs and welfare and the interests of wildlife can frequently be resolved if man is perceived as part of Nature rather than in opposition to it. However, social and scientific paradigms emphasize individuality at the expense of connectedness, and competition at the expense of co-operation. Ecologists are well placed to address the important questions of how fast human societies can adapt to change; which cultures are most adaptable, and how satisfactory given adaptations are likely to (...)
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  4. Ben A. Minteer & James P. Collins (2008). From Environmental to Ecological Ethics: Toward a Practical Ethics for Ecologists and Conservationists. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):483-501.score: 10.0
    Ecological research and conservation practice frequently raise difficult and varied ethical questions for scientific investigators and managers, including duties to public welfare, nonhuman individuals (i.e., animals and plants), populations, and ecosystems. The field of environmental ethics has contributed much to the understanding of general duties and values to nature, but it has not developed the resources to address the diverse and often unique practical concerns of ecological researchers and managers in the field, lab, and conservation facility. The emerging field of (...)
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  5. Stephen Bocking (1995). Ecosystems, Ecologists, and the Atom: Environmental Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Journal of the History of Biology 28 (1):1 - 47.score: 9.0
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  6. Daniel Fort & Maurice Zeeman (1996). Industrial Ecologists R' Us Industrial Ecology and Global Change R. Socolow C. Andrews F. Berkhout V. Thomas. Bioscience 46 (9):701-702.score: 9.0
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  7. Carl Folke (1995). Ecologists and Economists Can Find Common Ground. Bioscience 45 (4):283-284.score: 9.0
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  8. Richard B. Primack & Virginia O'Leary (1993). Cumulative Disadvantages in the Careers of Women Ecologists. Bioscience 43 (3):158-165.score: 9.0
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  9. Phillip Cassey & Tim M. Blackburn (2004). Publication and Rejection Among Successful Ecologists. Bioscience 54 (3):234.score: 9.0
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  10. Nancy B. Grimm, J. Grove Grove, Steward T. A. Pickett & Charles L. Redman (2000). Integrated Approaches to Long-Term Studies of Urban Ecological Systems Urban Ecological Systems Present Multiple Challenges to Ecologists—Pervasive Human Impact and Extreme Heterogeneity of Cities, and the Need to Integrate Social and Ecological Approaches, Concepts, and Theory. Bioscience 50 (7):571-584.score: 9.0
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  11. Gillian M. Puttick (1985). Industrious Insect Ecologists Chemical Ecology of Insects William J. Bell Ring T. Cardé. Bioscience 35 (4):254-254.score: 9.0
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  12. Len Broberg (2003). Conserving Ecosystems Locally: A Role for Ecologists in Land-Use Planning. Bioscience 53 (7):670.score: 9.0
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  13. with James P. Collins (2012). A Practical Ethics for Ecologists and Biodiversity Managers. In Ben A. Minteer (ed.), Refounding Environmental Ethics: Pragmatism, Principle, and Practice. Temple University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  14. June H. Cooley & Frank B. Golley (1989). Restraints to Communication for Ecologists in Developing Countries. Bioscience 39 (11):805-809.score: 9.0
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  15. Clarence Cottam (1965). The Ecologists' Role in Problems of Pesticide Pollution. Bioscience 15 (7):457-463.score: 9.0
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  16. Brian Czech (2002). The Imperative of Macroeconomics for Ecologists. Bioscience 52 (11):964.score: 9.0
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  17. Raymond F. Dasmann (1986). Vintage Hardin Filters Against Folly: How to Survive Despite Economists, Ecologists, and the Merely Eloquent Garrett Hardin. Bioscience 36 (11):748-749.score: 9.0
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  18. Joseph P. Dudley (2004). Nonacademic Niches for Professional Ecologists. Bioscience 54 (6):484.score: 9.0
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  19. Alexander J. Felson, Emily E. Oldfield & Mark A. Bradford (2013). Involving Ecologists in Shaping Large-Scale Green Infrastructure Projects. Bioscience 63 (11):882-890.score: 9.0
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  20. Daniel Fort & Maurice Zeeman (1996). Industrial Ecologists R'Us. Bioscience 46 (9):701-702.score: 9.0
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  21. Thomas J. Givnish (1983). This Book Is a Must for Plant Community Ecologists Tasks for Vegetation Science I: Macroclimate and Plant Forms: An Introduction to Predictive Modeling in Phytogeography Elgene Owen Box. Bioscience 33 (6):392-393.score: 9.0
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  22. Ray Grizzle (1995). Ecologists, Economists, and Social Scientists. Bioscience 45 (8):516-516.score: 9.0
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  23. J. Halfpenny & J. Clark (1988). Climate Calendars: Computer Graphics Reveal Patterns in Large Databases That Are Useful to Ecologists. Bioscience 38 (6):399-405.score: 9.0
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  24. Rachelle Hollander (1976). Ecologists, Ethical Codes, and the Struggles of a New Profession. Hastings Center Report 6 (1):45-46.score: 9.0
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  25. Donald L. Kramer (2001). Historical Context Contemporary Studies of Foraging by Evolutionary Ecologists Are Based on the Synthesis of Two Research Traditions, Both Emerging During the 1960s. The Ethological Approach to Behavior is Illustrated By. In C. W. Fox D. A. Roff (ed.), Evolutionary Ecology: Concepts and Case Studies. 232.score: 9.0
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  26. P. C. Lee (1992). Elton's Ecologists: A History of the Bureau of Animal Population. By Peter Crowcroft Pp. 177. (University of Chicago Press, 1991.). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):283-284.score: 9.0
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  27. E. M. Leeper (1977). "Ecologists Must Get Cracking": Odum Urges: Speed Up Worldwide Data Gathering Now. Bioscience 27 (11):755-758.score: 9.0
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  28. Michael A. Lefsky, Warren B. Cohen, Geoffrey G. Parker & David J. Harding (2002). Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies Lidar, an Emerging Remote Sensing Technology That Directly Measures the Three-Dimensional Distribution of Plant Canopies, Can Accurately Estimate Vegetation Structural Attributes and Should Be of Particular Interest to Forest, Landscape, and Global Ecologists. Bioscience 52 (1):19-30.score: 9.0
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  29. Wayne L. Linklater (2004). Wanted for Conservation Research: Behavioral Ecologists with a Broader Perspective. Bioscience 54 (4):352.score: 9.0
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  30. Brooke Baldauf McBride, Carol A. Brewer, Mary Bricker & Michael Machura (2011). Training the Next Generation of Renaissance Scientists: The GK–12 Ecologists, Educators, and Schools Program at the University of Montana. Bioscience 61 (6):466-476.score: 9.0
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  31. Norman Myers (1996). Economists and Ecologists Biodiversity Loss Charles A. Perrings Karl-Goran Maler Carl Folke C. S. Holling Bengt-Owe Jansson Biodiversity Conservation Charles A. Perrings Karl-Goran Maler Carl Folke C. S. Holling Bengt-Owe Jansson. [REVIEW] Bioscience 46 (9):717-719.score: 9.0
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  32. Norman Myers (1996). Economists and Ecologists. Bioscience 46 (9):717-719.score: 9.0
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  33. Dorothy Nelkin (1976). Ecologists and the Public Interest. Hastings Center Report 6 (1):38-44.score: 9.0
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  34. Scott Norris (2001). A New Voice in Conservation Conservation Medicine Seeks to Bring Ecologists, Veterinarians, and Doctors Together Around a Simple Unifying Concept: Health. Bioscience 51 (1):7-12.score: 9.0
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  35. Richard B. Primack & Elizabeth A. Stacy (1997). Women Ecologists Catching Up in Scientific Productivity, but Only When They Join the Race. Bioscience 47 (3):169-174.score: 9.0
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  36. Gillian M. Puttick (1985). Industrious Insect Ecologists. Bioscience 35 (4):254-254.score: 9.0
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  37. George J. Seidel (1971). Heidegger: Philosopher for Ecologists? [REVIEW] Man and World 4 (1):93-99.score: 9.0
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  38. D. S. Sulzbach (1982). Math for Ecologists Elementary Mathematical Ecology John Vandermeer. Bioscience 32 (4):285-285.score: 9.0
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  39. Yvonne Vadeboncoeur, M. Jake Vander Zanden & David M. Lodge (2002). Putting the Lake Back Together: Reintegrating Benthic Pathways Into Lake Food Web Models Lake Ecologists Tend to Focus Their Research on Pelagic Energy Pathways, but, From Algae to Fish, Benthic Organisms Form an Integral Part of Lake Food Webs. Bioscience 52 (1):44-54.score: 9.0
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  40. Charles Birch (2008). Science & Soul. Unsw Press.score: 6.0
     
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  41. Pierre Jacquiot (2008). Comparaison des processus de formation et de diffusion du mouvement écologiste en RFA et en France. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 2 (2):217-244.score: 5.0
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  42. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Are Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “Soft” Sciences? Annales Zoologici Finnici 39:87-98.score: 3.0
    Research in ecology and evolutionary biology (evo-eco) often tries to emulate the “hard” sciences such as physics and chemistry, but to many of its practitioners feels more like the “soft” sciences of psychology and sociology. I argue that this schizophrenic attitude is the result of lack of appreciation of the full consequences of the peculiarity of the evo-eco sciences as lying in between a-historical disciplines such as physics and completely historical ones as like paleontology. Furthermore, evo-eco researchers have gotten stuck (...)
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  43. Christina Richards, Oliver Bossdorf & Massimo Pigliucci (2010). What Role Does Heritable Epigenetic Variation Play in Phenotypic Evolution? BioScience 60 (3):232-237.score: 3.0
    To explore the potential evolutionary relevance of heritable epigenetic variation, the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center recently hosted a catalysis meeting that brought together molecular epigeneticists, experimental evolutionary ecologists, and theoretical population and quantitative geneticists working across a wide variety of systems. The group discussed the methods available to investigate epigenetic variation and epigenetic inheritance, and how to evaluate their importance for phenotypic evolution. We found that understanding the relevance of epigenetic effects in phe- notypic evolution will require clearly delineating (...)
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  44. Mark Sagoff (2009). Who is the Invader? Alien Species, Property Rights, and the Police Power. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):26-52.score: 3.0
    This paper argues that the occurrence of a non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, on one's property does not constitute a nuisance in the context of background principles of common law. No one is injured by it. The control of non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, does not constitute a compelling public interest, moreover, but represents primarily the concern of an epistemic community of conservation biologists and ecologists. This paper describes a history of cases in agricultural law that establish (...)
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  45. Annie L. Booth & Harvey L. Jacobs (1990). Ties That Bind: Native American Beliefs as a Foundation for Environmental Consciousness. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):27-43.score: 3.0
    In this article we examine the specific contributions Native American thought can make to the ongoing search for a Western ecological consciousness. We begin with a review of the influence of Native American beliefs on the different branches of the modem environmental movement and some initial comparisons of Western and Native American ways of seeing. We then review Native American thought on the natural world, highlighting beliefs in the need for reciprocity and balance, the world as a living being, and (...)
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  46. Bryan G. Norton (2008). Beyond Positivist Ecology: Toward an Integrated Ecological Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):581-592.score: 3.0
    A post-positivist understanding of ecological science and the call for an “ecological ethic” indicate the need for a radically new approach to evaluating environmental change. The positivist view of science cannot capture the essence of environmental sciences because the recent work of “reflexive” ecological modelers shows that this requires a reconceptualization of the way in which values and ecological models interact in scientific process. Reflexive modelers are ecological modelers who believe it is appropriate for ecologists to examine the motives (...)
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  47. Mark Sagoff (2005). Do Non-Native Species Threaten the Natural Environment? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):215-236.score: 3.0
    Conservation biologists and other environmentalists confront five obstacles in building support for regulatory policies that seek to exclude or remove introduced plants and other non-native species that threaten to harm natural areas or the natural environment. First, the concept of “harm to the natural environment” is nebulous and undefined. Second, ecologists cannot predict how introduced species will behave in natural ecosystems. If biologists cannot define “harm” or predict the behavior of introduced species, they must target all non-native species as (...)
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  48. Kevin de Laplante & Jay Odenbaugh, What Isn't Wrong with Ecosystem Ecology.score: 3.0
    Philosophers of the life sciences have devoted considerably more attention to evolutionary theory and genetics than to the various sub-disciplines of ecology, but recent work in the philosophy of ecology suggests reflects a growing interest in this area (Cooper 2003; Ginzburg and Colyvan 2004). However, philosophers of biology and ecology have focused almost entirely on conceptual and methodological issues in population and community ecology; conspicuously absent are foundational investigations in ecosystem ecology. This situation is regrettable. Ecosystem concepts play a central (...)
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  49. Midori Kagawa-Fox (2010). Environmental Ethics From the Japanese Perspective. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):57 – 73.score: 3.0
    The subject of Western environmental ethics has been widely written about and discussed but the same can not be said of 'Japanese' environmental ethics. This discipline has not been covered in any branch of Japanese philosophy nor has there been sufficient pressure exerted by ecologists on Japanese thinkers and writers to explain how the Japanese code addresses environmental concerns. Although some Japanese scholars have in the past articulated their ideas on working with the natural world, the field covering the (...)
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  50. Kevin deLaplante, Philosophy of Ecology: An Overview.score: 3.0
    The philosophy of ecology addresses foundational conceptual and methodological issues in ecological science. Specifying these issues is complicated by the fact that there is disagreement among ecologists over how to identify the proper domain of ecology. Many ecologists prefer a more restrictive definition that focuses on properties of nonhuman organisms in natural environments. Others defend a more expansive definition that includes the study of human-environment relations, a view that challenges the traditional conception of ecology as strictly a natural (...)
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