Search results for 'Ecology Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 80.0
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  2. Robert F. Shedinger (2013). An Ethics of Biodiversity: Christianity, Ecology, and the Variety of Life. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):224 - 226.score: 48.0
    (2013). An Ethics of Biodiversity: Christianity, Ecology, and the Variety of Life. Ethics, Policy & Environment: Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 224-226. doi: 10.1080/21550085.2013.801211.
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  3. Michael S. Northcott (1996). The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 45.0
    This book is about the extent, origins and causes of the environmental crisis. Dr Northcott argues that Christianity has lost the biblical awareness of the inter-connectedness of all life. He shows how Christian theologians and believers might recover a more ecologically friendly belief system and life style. The author provides an important corrective to secular approaches to environmental ethics, including utilitarian individualism, animal rights theories and deep ecology. He contends that neither the stewardship tradition, nor the panentheist or (...)
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  4. Hans-Dirk van Hoogstraten (2001). Deep Economy: Caring for Ecology, Humanity, and Religion. James Clarke & Co..score: 40.0
    A wide-ranging analysis of the economic world order and its ecological and theological dimensions, this unique and challenging work confronts us with the ...
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  5. Manussos Marangudakis (2008). On Nature, Christianity and Deep Ecology - a Response to W. S. Helton and N. D. Helton. Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):245-248.score: 36.0
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  6. Anna L. Peterson (2002). Christianity and Ecology: Seeking the Well-Being of Earth and Humans. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):105-108.score: 36.0
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  7. N. K. Gavriushin (1998). Christianity and Ecology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (3):27-36.score: 36.0
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  8. Anna L. Peterson (2002). Christianity and Ecology. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):105-108.score: 36.0
  9. Henryk Skolimowski (1987). Is Ecology Transcending Both Marxism and Christianity? Dialectics and Humanism 14:109.score: 36.0
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  10. Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 33.0
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  11. Steven A. Carr (1990). Celebrate Life: Hope for a Culture Preoccupied with Death. Wolgemuth & Hyatt.score: 30.0
     
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  12. Jonathan Clatworthy (1997). Good God: Green Theology and the Value of Creation. Jon Carpenter.score: 30.0
     
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  13. Lloyd George Geering (1999/2000). Tomorrow's God. Polebridge Press.score: 30.0
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  14. Lloyd George Geering (1994). Tomorrow's God: How We Create Our Worlds. B. Williams Books.score: 30.0
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  15. Michael S. Northcott (2007). A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming. Orbis Books.score: 30.0
    Message from the planet -- When prophecy fails -- Energy and empire -- Climate economics -- Ethical emissions -- Dwelling in the light -- Mobility and pilgrimage -- Faithful feasting -- Remembering in time.
     
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  16. Charles Birch (1990). On Purpose. New South Wales University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  17. David J. Wellman (2004). Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion, and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Drawing on the disciplines of Islamic and Christian Ethics, International Affairs, Environmental Science, History and Anthropology, Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy that values (...)
     
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  18. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Are Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “Soft” Sciences? Annales Zoologici Finnici 39:87-98.score: 18.0
    Research in ecology and evolutionary biology (evo-eco) often tries to emulate the “hard” sciences such as physics and chemistry, but to many of its practitioners feels more like the “soft” sciences of psychology and sociology. I argue that this schizophrenic attitude is the result of lack of appreciation of the full consequences of the peculiarity of the evo-eco sciences as lying in between a-historical disciplines such as physics and completely historical ones as like paleontology. Furthermore, evo-eco researchers have gotten (...)
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  19. Donato Bergandi (2000). Eco-Cybernetics: The Ecology and Cybernetics of Missing Emergences. Kybernetes 29 (7/8):928-942..score: 18.0
    Considers that in ecosystem, landscape and global ecology, an energetics reading of ecological systems is an expression of a cybernetic, systemic and holistic approach. In ecosystem ecology, the Odumian paradigm emphasizes the concept of emergence, but it has not been accompanied by the creation of a method that fully respects the complexity of the objects studied. In landscape ecology, although the emergentist, multi-level, triadic methodology of J.K. Feibleman and D.T. Campbell has gained acceptance, the importance of emergent (...)
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  20. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  21. Kim Cuddington (2001). The “Balance of Nature” Metaphor and Equilibrium in Population Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):463-479.score: 18.0
    I claim that the balance of nature metaphoris shorthand for a paradigmatic view of natureas a beneficent force. I trace the historicalorigins of this concept and demonstrate that itoperates today in the discipline of populationecology. Although it might be suspected thatthis metaphor is a pre-theoretic description ofthe more precisely defined notion ofequilibrium, I demonstrate that balance ofnature has constricted the meaning ofmathematical equilibrium in population ecology.As well as influencing the meaning ofequilibrium, the metaphor has also loaded themathematical term with (...)
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  22. Yiftach Fehige (2013). Sexual Diversity and Divine Creation: A Tightrope Walk Between Christianity and Science. Zygon 48 (1):35-59.score: 18.0
    Although modern societies have come to recognize diversity in human sexuality as simply part of nature, many Christian communities and thinkers still have considerable difficulties with related developments in politics, legislation, and science. In fact, homosexuality is a recurrent topic in the transdisciplinary encounter between Christianity and the sciences, an encounter that is otherwise rather “asexual.” I propose that the recent emergence of “Christianity and Science” as an academic field in its own right is an important part of (...)
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  23. Peter Forrest (2010). Spinozistic Pantheism, the Environment and Christianity. Sophia 49 (4):463-473.score: 18.0
    I am not a pantheist and I don’t believe that pantheism is consistent with Christianity. My preferred speculation is what I call the Swiss Cheese theory: we and our artefacts are the holes in God, the only Godless parts of reality. In this paper, I begin by considering a world rather like ours but without any beings capable of sin. Ignoring extraterrestrials and angels we could consider the world, say, 5 million years ago. Pantheism was, I say, true at (...)
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  24. Jay Odenbaugh (2005). Idealized, Inaccurate but Successful: A Pragmatic Approach to Evaluating Models in Theoretical Ecology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):231-255.score: 18.0
    Ecologists attempt to understand the diversity of life with mathematical models. Often, mathematical models contain simplifying idealizations designed to cope with the blooming, buzzing confusion of the natural world. This strategy frequently issues in models whose predictions are inaccurate. Critics of theoretical ecology argue that only predictively accurate models are successful and contribute to the applied work of conservation biologists. Hence, they think that much of the mathematical work of ecologists is poor science. Against this view, I argue that (...)
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  25. Edwin Hutchins (2010). Cognitive Ecology. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):705-715.score: 18.0
    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson’s ecological psychology, Bateson’s ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift (...)
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  26. Gregory John Cooper (2003). The Science of the Struggle for Existence: On the Foundations of Ecology. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book is the first examination in almost a decade of issues in the philosophy of ecology that have been a source of controversy since the existence of ecology as an explicit scientific discipline. The controversies revolve around the idea of a balance of nature, the possibility of general ecological knowledge and the role of model-building in ecology. The Science of the Struggle for Existence is also the first sustained treatment of these issues that incorporates both a (...)
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  27. Gregory Cooper (1993). The Competition Controversy in Community Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):359-384.score: 18.0
    There is a long history of controversy in ecology over the role of competition in determining patterns of distribution and abundance, and over the significance of the mathematical modeling of competitive interactions. This paper examines the controversy. Three kinds of considerations have been involved at one time or another during the history of this debate. There has been dispute about the kinds of regularities ecologists can expect to find, about the significance of evolutionary considerations for ecological inquiry, and about (...)
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  28. Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies or geography.
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  29. Simone Weil (1957/1998). Intimations of Christianity Among the Ancient Greeks. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In Intimations of Christianity Among the Ancient Greeks , Simone Weil discusses precursors to Christian religious ideas which can be found in ancient Greek mythology, literature and philosophy. She looks at evidence of "Christian" feelings in Greek literature, notably in Electra, Orestes, and Antigone , and in the Iliad , going on to examine God in Plato, and divine love in creation, as seen by the ancient Greeks.
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  30. Mark Colyvan & Lev R. Ginzburg (2003). The Galilean Turn in Population Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):401-414.score: 18.0
    The standard mathematical models in population ecology assume that a population's growth rate is a function of its environment. In this paper we investigate an alternative proposal according to which the rate of change of the growth rate is a function of the environment and of environmental change. We focus on the philosophical issues involved in such a fundamental shift in theoretical assumptions, as well as on the explanations the two theories offer for some (...)
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  31. Roberta L. Millstein (2013). Exploring the Status of Population Genetics: The Role of Ecology. Biological Theory 7 (4):346-357.score: 18.0
    The status of population genetics has become hotly debated among biologists and philosophers of biology. Many seem to view population genetics as relatively unchanged since the Modern Synthesis and have argued that subjects such as development were left out of the Synthesis. Some have called for an extended evolutionary synthesis or for recognizing the insignificance of population genetics. Yet others such as Michael Lynch have defended population genetics, declaring "nothing in evolution makes sense except in the light of population genetics" (...)
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  32. Yrjö Haila & Peter Taylor (2001). The Philosophical Dullness of Classical Ecology, and a Levinsian Alternative. Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):93-102.score: 18.0
    Ecology has had a lower profile in Biology & Philosophy than one might expect on the basis of the attention ecology is given in public discussions in relation to environmental issues. Our tentative explanation is that ecology appears theoretically redundant within biology and, consequently, philosophically challenging problemsrelated to biology are commonly supposed to be somewhere else, particularly in the molecular sphere. Richard Levins has recognized the genuine challenges posed by ecology for theoretical and philosophical thinking in (...)
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  33. Andrew Collier (2001). Christianity and Marxism: A Philosophical Contribution to Their Reconciliation. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Christians and Marxists have co-operated in various forms of political work in recent decades, and, after earlier years of antagonism, thinkers on both sides have come to take the other seriously. The aim of this book is to get Christianity and Marxism to meet on terrain on which they might seem most opposed: their philosophical positions; and to do so without watering either down, but taking then full strength.
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  34. Caresse Cranwell (2010). Embracing Thanatos-in-Eros: Evolutionary Ecology and Panentheism. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (2):271-283.score: 18.0
    If Panentheism’s core thesis, that God is in the world, is to animate a spiritual approach to life, then we have to account for the way in which God is in the destructive or thanative dimensions of life. From the perspective of evolutionary ecology the universe is imbued with creative and destructive energies. The creative drive can be termed eros as creation occurs through the expansion of relational unities, holons. The destructive drive is termed thanatos and is the drive (...)
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  35. Xinzhong Yao (1996). Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape. Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.score: 18.0
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  36. Freya Mathews (ed.) (1995/1996). Ecology and Democracy. Frank Cass.score: 18.0
    What is the optimal political framework for environmental reform reform on a scale commensurate with the global ecological crisis? In particular, how adequate are liberal forms of parliamentary democracy to the challenge posed by this crisis? These are the questions pondered by the contributors to this volume. Exploration of the possibilities of democracy gives rise to certain common themes. These are the relation between ecological morality and political structures or procedures and the question of the structure of decision-making and distribution (...)
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  37. Donato Bergandi (ed.) (2013). The Structural Links Between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics: The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer.score: 18.0
    Abstract - Evolutionary, ecological and ethical studies are, at the same time, specific scientific disciplines and, from an historical point of view, structurally linked domains of research. In a context of environmental crisis, the need is increasingly emerging for a connecting epistemological framework able to express a common or convergent tendency of thought and practice aimed at building, among other things, an environmental policy management respectful of the planet’s biodiversity and its evolutionary potential. -/- Evolutionary biology, ecology and ethics: (...)
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  38. Raymond L. Bryant (1997). Third World Political Ecology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The authors review the historical development of the field, explain what is distinctive about Third World political ecology, and suggest areas for future ...
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  39. Matthew Eric Engelke & Matt Tomlinson (eds.) (2006). The Limits of Meaning: Case Studies in the Anthropology of Christianity. Berghahn Books.score: 18.0
    Meaning, Anthropology, Christianity Matt Tomlinson & Matthew Engelke The Uses of Meaning As Stanley Tambiah once said, "the various ways 'meaning' is ...
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  40. Michael Gurven (2004). To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.score: 18.0
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
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  41. Michel Henry (2003). I Am the Truth: Toward a Philosophy of Christianity. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    A part of the “return to religion” now evident in European philosophy, this book represents the culmination of the career of a leading phenomenological thinker whose earlier works trace a trajectory from Marx through a genealogy of psychoanalysis that interprets Descartes’s “I think, I am” as “I feel myself thinking, I am.” In this book, Henry does not ask whether Christianity is “true” or “false.” Rather, what is in question here is what Christianity considers as truth, what kind (...)
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  42. Stefan Linquist (2008). But is It Progress? On the Alleged Advances of Conservation Biology Over Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):529-544.score: 18.0
    As conservation biology has developed as a distinct discipline from ecology, conservation guidelines based on ecological theory have been largely cast aside in favor of theory-independent decision procedures for designing conservation reserves. I argue that this transition has failed to advance the field toward its aim of preserving biodiversity. The abandonment of island biogeography theory in favor of complementarity-based algorithms is a case in point. In what follows, I consider the four central objections raised against island biogeographic conservation guidelines, (...)
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  43. Gregory M. Mikkelson (2001). Complexity and Verisimilitude: Realism for Ecology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):533-546.score: 18.0
    When data are limited, simple models of complex ecological systems tend to wind up closer to the truth than more complex models of the same systems. This greater proximity to the truth, or verisimilitude, leads to greater predictive success. When more data are available, the advantage of simplicity decreases, and more complex models may gain the upper hand. In ecology, holistic models are usually simpler than reductionistic models. Thus, when data are limited, holistic models have an advantage over reductionistic (...)
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  44. Sean Esbjörn-Hargens (2009). Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World. Integral Books.score: 18.0
    In response to this pressing need, Integral Ecology unites valuable insights from multiple perspectives into a comprehensive theoretical framework-one that can ...
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  45. Gregorio Moreno-Rueda (2013). How Frequently Do Allegations of Scientific Misconduct Occur in Ecology and Evolution, and What Happens Afterwards? Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):93-96.score: 18.0
    Scientific misconduct obstructs the advance of knowledge in science. Its impact in some disciplines is still poorly known, as is the frequency in which it is detected. Here, I examine how frequently editors of ecology and evolution journals detect scientist misconduct. On average, editors managed 0.114 allegations of misconduct per year. Editors considered 6 of 14 allegations (42.9%) to be true, but only in 2 cases were the authors declared guilty, the remaining being dropped for lack of proof. The (...)
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  46. Irene Oh (2010). Motherhood in Christianity and Islam: Critiques, Realities, and Possibilities. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):638-653.score: 18.0
    Common experiences of mothering offer profound critiques of maternal ethical norms found in both Christianity and Islam. The familiar responsibilities of caring for children, assumed by the majority of Christian and Muslim women, provide the basis for reassessing sacrificial and selfless love, protesting unjust religious and political systems, and dismantling romanticized notions of childcare. As a distinctive category of women's experience, motherhood may offer valuable perspectives necessary for remedying injustices that afflict mothers and children in particular, as well as (...)
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  47. Aletta Biersack & James B. Greenberg (eds.) (2006). Reimagining Political Ecology. Duke University Press.score: 18.0
    Scholars from both disciplinary and interdisciplinary formations will discover the need to consult and use this volume.
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  48. David Castle (2001). A Gradualist Theory of Discovery in Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):547-571.score: 18.0
    The distinction between the context ofdiscovery and the context of justificationrestricts philosophy of science to the rationalreconstruction of theories, and characterizesscientific discovery as rare, theoreticalupheavals that defy rational reconstruction. Kuhnian challenges to the two contextsdistinction show that non-rational elementspersist in the justification of theories, butgo no further to provide a positive account ofdiscovery. A gradualist theory of discoverydeveloped in this paper shows, with supportfrom ecological cases, that discoveries areroutinely made in ecology by extending modelsto new domains, or by making (...)
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  49. James Franklin (2004). Is Jensenism Compatible with Christianity? Quadrant 48 (12):30-31.score: 18.0
    A RECENT BIOGRAPHY of Marcus Loane, evangelical Anglican Archbishop of Sydney in the 1960s, records that as a student at Moore Theological College he would read during lectures to avoid having to listen to the liberal Principal. When you are committed to a closed system of thought, you can't be too careful when it comes to letting ideas in from the outside. But what about the ideas already inside? How does the Sydney Anglican interpretation of Christianity compare to what (...)
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  50. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1993). Method in Ecology: Strategies for Conservation. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In this volume, the authors discuss what practical contributions ecology can and can't make in applied science and environmental problem solving. In the first section, they discuss conceptual problems that have often prevented the formulation and evaluation of powerful, precise, general theories, explain why island biogeography is still beset with controversy and examine the ways that science is value laden. In the second section, they describe how ecology can give us specific answers to practical environmental questions posed in (...)
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