Search results for 'Ecology Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert F. Shedinger (2013). An Ethics of Biodiversity: Christianity, Ecology, and the Variety of Life. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):224 - 226.score: 144.0
    (2013). An Ethics of Biodiversity: Christianity, Ecology, and the Variety of Life. Ethics, Policy & Environment: Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 224-226. doi: 10.1080/21550085.2013.801211.
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  2. Reasonableness Of Christianity (2010). The Reasonableness of Christianity and its Vindications. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum.score: 120.0
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  3. Manussos Marangudakis (2008). On Nature, Christianity and Deep Ecology - a Response to W. S. Helton and N. D. Helton. Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):245-248.score: 120.0
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  4. Anna L. Peterson (2002). Christianity and Ecology: Seeking the Well-Being of Earth and Humans. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):105-108.score: 120.0
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  5. N. K. Gavriushin (1998). Christianity and Ecology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 37 (3):27-36.score: 120.0
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  6. Anna L. Peterson (2002). Christianity and Ecology. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):105-108.score: 120.0
  7. Henryk Skolimowski (1987). Is Ecology Transcending Both Marxism and Christianity? Dialectics and Humanism 14:109.score: 120.0
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  8. Michael S. Northcott (1996). The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 94.0
    This book is about the extent, origins and causes of the environmental crisis. Dr Northcott argues that Christianity has lost the biblical awareness of the inter-connectedness of all life. He shows how Christian theologians and believers might recover a more ecologically friendly belief system and life style. The author provides an important corrective to secular approaches to environmental ethics, including utilitarian individualism, animal rights theories and deep ecology. He contends that neither the stewardship tradition, nor the panentheist or (...)
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  9. Hans-Dirk van Hoogstraten (2001). Deep Economy: Caring for Ecology, Humanity, and Religion. James Clarke & Co..score: 92.0
    A wide-ranging analysis of the economic world order and its ecological and theological dimensions, this unique and challenging work confronts us with the ...
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  10. Catharina J. M. Halkes (1991). New Creation: Christian Feminism and the Renewal of the Earth. Westminster/John Knox Press.score: 70.0
    A bold and visionary book that reveals the false and catastrophically damaging images at the root of the oppression of women and the rape of Earth's resources, ...
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  11. Steven A. Carr (1990). Celebrate Life: Hope for a Culture Preoccupied with Death. Wolgemuth & Hyatt.score: 60.0
     
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  12. Jonathan Clatworthy (1997). Good God: Green Theology and the Value of Creation. Jon Carpenter.score: 60.0
     
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  13. Lloyd George Geering (1999/2000). Tomorrow's God. Polebridge Press.score: 60.0
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  14. Lloyd George Geering (1994). Tomorrow's God: How We Create Our Worlds. B. Williams Books.score: 60.0
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  15. Michael S. Northcott (2007). A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming. Orbis Books.score: 60.0
    Message from the planet -- When prophecy fails -- Energy and empire -- Climate economics -- Ethical emissions -- Dwelling in the light -- Mobility and pilgrimage -- Faithful feasting -- Remembering in time.
     
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  16. David J. Wellman (2004). Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion, and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Drawing on the disciplines of Islamic and Christian Ethics, International Affairs, Environmental Science, History and Anthropology, Sustainable Diplomacy: Ecology, Religion and Ethics in Muslim-Christian Relations is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy that values (...)
     
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  17. James A. Nash (1996). Toward the Ecological Reformation of Christianity. Interpretation 50 (1):5-15.score: 48.0
    Christian theology and ethics are largely inadequate to confront the ecological crisis of today. They are in need of reformation. At the center of Christian faith, we shall not find a mandate to pollute, plunder, and prey on the rest of nature. Instead, we shall discover that the core affirmations endow all life with a moral significance that entails human responsibility toward the whole of nature.
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  18. Charles Birch (1990). On Purpose. New South Wales University Press.score: 48.0
     
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  19. B. Szerszynski (2010). Book Review: Willis Jenkins, Ecologies of Grace: Environmental Ethics and Christian Theology (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). Xi + 376 Pp. 22.50/US$35 (Hb), ISBN 978--0--19--532851--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (3):327-330.score: 42.0
  20. M. Northcott (2008). Book Review: John Hart, Sacramental Commons: Christian Ecological Ethics (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2006). Xxv + 248 Pp. 17.99 (Pb), ISBN 978--0--7425--4605--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):303-306.score: 42.0
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  21. David W. Chappell (1992). Ecological Crisis [Christian and Buddhist Responses]. Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:161-178.score: 42.0
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  22. Anna Peterson (2014). Gretel van Wieren: Restored to Earth: Christianity, Environmental Ethics, and Ecological Restoration. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):347-348.score: 42.0
    This book explores the moral, social, and spiritual dimensions of ecological restoration. Gretel Van Wieren, a religion scholar, builds on the work of both critics and advocates of restoration to develop a balanced and well-informed approach to a controversial topic in environmental ethics. Ultimately she finds much value in restoration, as much for its ability to help build human community as for its contributions to ecological well-being. Restoration, she summarizes, is “the attempt to heal and make the human relationship to (...)
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  23. Allan M. Savage (2008). Phenomenological Philosophy and Orthodox Christian Scientific Ecological Theology. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2).score: 42.0
    Contemporary philosophy, to be useful to Orthodox Christian theology, must capture the “essence” of the divine and human activity in the world in the scientific sense of Edmund Husserl. Scholastic philosophy is no longer an academically privileged supporter of theology in the interpretation of the universe. In its place, this paper suggests that phenomenological philosophy becomes the unique and transcendent partner, as it were, in the interpretive dialogue. The methodological thinking of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger offers a way of (...)
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  24. Michael S. Northcott (2001). Ecology and Christian Ethics. In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
  25. Kevin J. O'Brien (2012). La Causa and Environmental Justice: César Chávez as a Resource for Christian Ecological Ethics. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 32 (1):151-168.score: 42.0
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  26. Jame Schaefer (2008). Sacramental Commons: Christian Ecological Ethics. By John Hart. Zygon 43 (4):993-996.score: 40.0
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  27. Susan Power Bratton (1993). Loving Nature: Ecological Integrity and Christian Responsibility. Environmental Ethics 15 (1):93-96.score: 40.0
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  28. William Greenway (forthcoming). Book Review: A New Climate for Theology: God, the World, and Global Warming by Sallie McFague Fortress, Minneapolis, 2008. 198 Pp. $20.00. ISBN 978-0-8006-6271-4.; Ecologies of Grace: Environmental Ethics and Christian Theology by Willis Jenkins Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2008. 363 Pp. $35.00 (Cloth). ISBN 978-0-19-532851-6. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (1):82-84.score: 40.0
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  29. Gordon D. Kaufman (2003). The Theological Structure of Christian Faith and the Feasibility of a Global Ecological Ethic. Zygon 38 (1):147-161.score: 40.0
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  30. Denis Edwards (2004). Ecology at the Heart of the Christian Doctrine. Australasian Catholic Record, The 81 (1):58.score: 40.0
  31. Joan Gibb Engel (1997). Ecology, Justice, and Christian Faith: Comments of a Comma Consultant. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 18 (1):21 - 31.score: 40.0
  32. Ajita Kullu (2008). Ecological Evil a Christian Response. Journal of Dharma 33 (1-4):175-184.score: 40.0
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  33. D. O'Mahony (2001). An Emerging Christian Perspective on Ecology, as Shaped by Scripture, Cosmology and Contemporary Science. Journal of Dharma 26 (1):96-120.score: 40.0
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  34. Paul Oxley (2003). Earth Revealing - Earth Healing: Ecology and Christian Theology [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 80 (1):122.score: 40.0
  35. M. Pitts (1990). An Analysis of Contributions to the Ecological Debate by Some Christian Churches. History of European Ideas 12 (4):523-536.score: 40.0
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  36. H. Paul Santmire, Langdon Gilkey & Mark William Worthing (forthcoming). Philip Hefner 0-8006-2579-X Paper $18.00 ($24.50 Canada) the Travail of Nature the Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology. [REVIEW] Zygon.score: 40.0
     
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  37. Amelia Ferreira Martins Limeira & Maristela Oliveira de Andrade (2012). Diálogo entre a tradição bíblica e a construção do discurso teológico ambiental cristão (Dialogue between bible's tradition and the environment christian theological discourse construction). Horizonte 10 (26):603-618.score: 34.0
    A tradição bíblica tem inspirado leituras e interpretações ecológicas por parte de teólogos de vertentes cristãs diversas, dentre os quais podemos destacar: Carriker, Reimer, Schaeffer e Stott. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar alguns textos das Escrituras Sagradas judaico-cristãs e o modo como estes têm sido interpretados por teólogos cristãos vinculados à vertente reformada à luz de uma leitura ecológica. Um corte epistemológico foi feito reconhecendo nestes teólogos posições ideológicas heterogêneas a fim de preservar a re(leitura) dos textos bíblicos escolhidos (...)
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  38. David R. Lea (1993). The Environmental Implications of Post Renaissance Christianity. Agriculture and Human Values 10 (4):50-57.score: 30.0
    Recently there has been considerable controversy over the environmental impact of Christian teaching. During the beginnings of our increased awareness of the ecological crisis, several strong papers appeared condemning Christianity for encouraging environmental exploitation. Recently a number of works have sought to defend the Judeo-Christian tradition by emphasizing different aspects of a message that allegedly promotes environmentally friendly behavior. Overall, however, these interpretations exhibit doubtful ontic significance. It is the contention of this paper that Christianity evolved profoundly after (...)
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  39. M. Braxton Donald (2007). Religious Naturalism and the Future of Christianity. Zygon 42 (2):317-342.score: 30.0
    Loyal Rue suggests that religion is not about God as such but about the cultivation of personal and social well-being. Religion may employ cultural resources that include concepts of supernatural agencies, but religion's essential functionalities are not dependent on that particular resource. I largely endorse Rue's view of religion and employ Rue as a guide to thinking through its consequences for the future of Christianity. For Rue, two challenges face Christianity: the erosion of confidence in personal-god concepts and (...)
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  40. Paul Maltby (2008). Fundamentalist Dominion, Postmodern Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 119-141.score: 28.0
    Christian fundamentalist dominionism is susceptible to a conventional ecological critique; that is to say, one framed in scientific-environmentalist terms of its unsustainability as a practice, given nature’s finite resources and the fragility of ecosystems. Alternatively, a postmodern ecological critique has the conceptual tools to contest dominionism at the level of its discursive transactions, that is to say, the narrative frames and interpretive methods through which fundamentalists have constructed their understanding of the natural world. I shall suggest how postmodernism enables critical (...)
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  41. Jürgen Moltmann (2012). Ethics of Hope. Fortress Press.score: 28.0
    Part 1. Eschatology and ethics. Introduction -- Apocalyptic eschatology -- Christological eschatology -- Separatist eschatology -- Transformative eschatology -- Part 2. An ethics of life. A culture of life -- Medical ethics -- Part 3. Earth ethics. In the space of the earth, what is the earth? -- The time of the earth -- Ecology -- Earth ethics -- Part 4. Ethics of just peace. Criteria for forming a judgment -- Divine and human righteousness and justice -- Dragon slaying (...)
     
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  42. Christian Diehm (2014). Darwin and Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 19 (1):73-93.score: 26.0
    Upon first encountering the writings of deep ecology theorists, people are sometimes surprised to learn that, despite its moniker, deep ecology is not a branch of the natural sciences. It is, rather, a branch of the environmental movement that was formally introduced to the English-speaking world by Arne Naess in his essay “The Shallow and the Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement: A Summary” (Naess 1973). Naess’s goal in this article was, as its title indicates, to contrast more conventional, (...)
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  43. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Are Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “Soft” Sciences? Annales Zoologici Finnici 39:87-98.score: 24.0
    Research in ecology and evolutionary biology (evo-eco) often tries to emulate the “hard” sciences such as physics and chemistry, but to many of its practitioners feels more like the “soft” sciences of psychology and sociology. I argue that this schizophrenic attitude is the result of lack of appreciation of the full consequences of the peculiarity of the evo-eco sciences as lying in between a-historical disciplines such as physics and completely historical ones as like paleontology. Furthermore, evo-eco researchers have gotten (...)
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  44. Donato Bergandi (2000). Eco-Cybernetics: The Ecology and Cybernetics of Missing Emergences. Kybernetes 29 (7/8):928-942..score: 24.0
    Considers that in ecosystem, landscape and global ecology, an energetics reading of ecological systems is an expression of a cybernetic, systemic and holistic approach. In ecosystem ecology, the Odumian paradigm emphasizes the concept of emergence, but it has not been accompanied by the creation of a method that fully respects the complexity of the objects studied. In landscape ecology, although the emergentist, multi-level, triadic methodology of J.K. Feibleman and D.T. Campbell has gained acceptance, the importance of emergent (...)
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  45. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  46. Kim Cuddington (2001). The “Balance of Nature” Metaphor and Equilibrium in Population Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):463-479.score: 24.0
    I claim that the balance of nature metaphoris shorthand for a paradigmatic view of natureas a beneficent force. I trace the historicalorigins of this concept and demonstrate that itoperates today in the discipline of populationecology. Although it might be suspected thatthis metaphor is a pre-theoretic description ofthe more precisely defined notion ofequilibrium, I demonstrate that balance ofnature has constricted the meaning ofmathematical equilibrium in population ecology.As well as influencing the meaning ofequilibrium, the metaphor has also loaded themathematical term with (...)
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  47. Yiftach Fehige (2013). Sexual Diversity and Divine Creation: A Tightrope Walk Between Christianity and Science. Zygon 48 (1):35-59.score: 24.0
    Although modern societies have come to recognize diversity in human sexuality as simply part of nature, many Christian communities and thinkers still have considerable difficulties with related developments in politics, legislation, and science. In fact, homosexuality is a recurrent topic in the transdisciplinary encounter between Christianity and the sciences, an encounter that is otherwise rather “asexual.” I propose that the recent emergence of “Christianity and Science” as an academic field in its own right is an important part of (...)
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  48. Jay Odenbaugh (2005). Idealized, Inaccurate but Successful: A Pragmatic Approach to Evaluating Models in Theoretical Ecology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):231-255.score: 24.0
    Ecologists attempt to understand the diversity of life with mathematical models. Often, mathematical models contain simplifying idealizations designed to cope with the blooming, buzzing confusion of the natural world. This strategy frequently issues in models whose predictions are inaccurate. Critics of theoretical ecology argue that only predictively accurate models are successful and contribute to the applied work of conservation biologists. Hence, they think that much of the mathematical work of ecologists is poor science. Against this view, I argue that (...)
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  49. Edwin Hutchins (2010). Cognitive Ecology. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):705-715.score: 24.0
    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson’s ecological psychology, Bateson’s ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift (...)
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  50. Peter Forrest (2010). Spinozistic Pantheism, the Environment and Christianity. Sophia 49 (4):463-473.score: 24.0
    I am not a pantheist and I don’t believe that pantheism is consistent with Christianity. My preferred speculation is what I call the Swiss Cheese theory: we and our artefacts are the holes in God, the only Godless parts of reality. In this paper, I begin by considering a world rather like ours but without any beings capable of sin. Ignoring extraterrestrials and angels we could consider the world, say, 5 million years ago. Pantheism was, I say, true at (...)
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