Search results for 'Economic forecasting Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. B. J. Mason, Peter Mathias & J. H. Westcott (eds.) (1986). Predictability in Science and Society: A Joint Symposium of the Royal Society and the British Academy Held on 20 and 21 March 1986. [REVIEW] Distributed by Scholium International.
     
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  2.  16
    Robert Evans (2007). Social Networks and Private Spaces in Economic Forecasting. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):686-697.
    The outputs of economic forecasting—predictions for national economic indicators such as GDP, unemployment rates and inflation—are all highly visible. The production of these forecasts is a much more private affair, however, typically being thought of as the work of individual forecasters or forecast teams using their economic model to produce a forecast that is then made public. This conception over-emphasises the individual and the technical whilst silencing the broader social context through which economic forecasters develop (...)
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  3.  9
    Seweryn Żurawicki (1975). Seweryn Żurawicki, Problemy Prognozowania Ekonomicznego (Problems of Economic Forecasting). Dialectics and Humanism 2 (4):173-175.
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  4.  6
    Seweryn Żurawicki (1975). Seweryn Żurawicki, Problemy Prognozowania Ekonomicznego (Problems of Economic Forecasting). Dialectics and Humanism 2 (4):173-175.
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    Clive Wj Granger (2012). The Philosophy of Economic Forecasting. In Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.), Philosophy of Economics. North Holland
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  6. Franco Modigliani (forthcoming). Fluctuations in the Saving Ratio: A Problem in Economic Forecasting. Social Research.
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  7.  40
    David A. Bessler & Zijun Wang (2012). D-Separation, Forecasting, and Economic Science: A Conjecture. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 73 (2):295-314.
    The paper considers the conjecture that forecasts from preferred economic models or theories d-separate forecasts from less preferred models or theories from the Actual realization of the variable for which a scientific explanation is sought. D-separation provides a succinct notion to represent forecast dominance of one set of forecasts over another; it provides, as well, a criterion for model preference as a fundamental device for progress in economic science. We demonstrate these ideas with examples from three areas of (...)
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    David Johnstone (2007). Economic Darwinism: Who has the Best Probabilities? [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 62 (1):47-96.
    Simulation evidence obtained within a Bayesian model of price-setting in a betting market, where anonymous gamblers queue to bet against a risk-neutral bookmaker, suggests that a gambler who wants to maximize future profits should trade on the advice of the analyst cum probability forecaster who records the best probability score, rather than the highest trading profits, during the preceding observation period. In general, probability scoring rules, specifically the log score and better known “Brier” (quadratic) score, are found to have higher (...)
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  9. Augusto Forti (ed.) (1984). Scientific Forecasting and Human Needs: Trends, Methods, and Message: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Tbilisi, Ussr, 6-11 December 1981. [REVIEW] Pergamon.
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  10. Carlo Maria Flumiani (1978). The Economic Philosophy of History & the Science of Maximal Prediction. American Classical College Press.
     
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  11.  13
    Jamie Morgan (2012). Forecasting, Prediction and Precision: A Commentary. Economic Thought 1 (2).
    Forecasting involves an underlying conceptualization of probability. It is this that gives sense to the notion of precision in number that makes us think of economic forecasting as more than simply complicated guesswork. We think of it as well-founded statement, a science and not an art of numbers. However, this understanding is at odds with the nature of social reality and the attributes of the forecaster. We should think differently about how we both anticipate and make the (...)
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  12.  6
    Robert S. Goldfarb, H. O. Stekler & Joel David (2005). Methodological Issues in Forecasting: Insights From the Egregious Business Forecast Errors of Late 1930. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (4):517-542.
    This paper examines some economic forecasts made in late 1930 that were intended to predict economic activity in the United States in order to shed light on several methodological issues. We document that these forecasts were extremely optimistic, predicting that the recession in the US would soon end, and that 1931 would show a recovery. These forecasts displayed egregious errors, because 1931 witnessed the largest negative growth rate for the US economy in any year in the twentieth century. (...)
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    Gregor Betz (2006). Prediction or Prophecy? The Boundaries of Economic Foreknowledge and Their Socio-Political Consequences. DUV.
    Gregor Betz explores the following questions: Where are the limits of economics, in particular the limits of economic foreknowledge? Are macroeconomic forecasts credible predictions or mere prophecies and what would this imply for the way economic policy decisions are taken? Is rational economic decision making possible without forecasting at all?
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  14. Charles H. Anderton & Jurgen Brauer (eds.) (2016). Economic Aspects of Genocides, Other Mass Atrocities, and Their Preventions. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Alongside other types of mass atrocities, genocide has received extensive scholarly, policy, and practitioner attention. Missing, however, is the contribution of economists to better understand and prevent such crimes. This edited collection by 41 accomplished scholars examines economic aspects of genocides, other mass atrocities, and their prevention. Chapters include numerous case studies, probing literature reviews, and completely novel work based on extraordinary country-specific datasets. Also included are chapters on the demographic, gendered, and economic class nature of genocide. Replete (...)
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  15. Truman Fassett Bewley (ed.) (1989). Advances in Economic Theory: Fifth World Congress. Cambridge University Press.
    The Econometric Society holds a World Congress every five years. The program of these congresses has traditionally included a series of invited symposia, where speakers survey important recent advances in economic theory and econometrics. This volume, with its focus on economic theory and its companion volumes on econometrics contain papers delivered at the Fifth World Congress held in 1985. Designed to make material accessible to a general audience of economists, these articles should be helpful to anyone with (...)
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  16. Truman Fassett Bewley (ed.) (2013). Advances in Economic Theory: Fifth World Congress. Cambridge University Press.
    The Econometric Society holds a World Congress every five years. The program of these congresses has traditionally included a series of invited symposia, where speakers survey important recent advances in economic theory and econometrics. This volume, with its focus on economic theory and its companion volumes on econometrics contain papers delivered at the Fifth World Congress held in 1985. Designed to make material accessible to a general audience of economists, these articles should be helpful to anyone with (...)
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  17.  1
    Hermann Giesecke (2009). Pädagogik, Quo Vadis?: Ein Essay Über Bildung Im Kapitalismus. Juventa.
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  18.  11
    Olena Kutsenko (2014). Програмні Позиції Соціал-Демократичної Партії Німеччини Щодо Економічної Перебудови Німеччини Після Розгрому Нацизму (1945-1949 Рр.). [REVIEW] Схід 6:206-210.
    Based on analysis of program documents and performances of the leading actors of Social Democratic Party of Germany, this article examines economic views and conceptions of social-democrats during the period of occupation between 1945 and 1949. The article analyzes the background of these economic concepts starting from the times of Nazi regime in Germany when SDP leaders were living in exile, and describes their evolution between 1945 and 1945 during the negotiations of three post-war Party Congresses. The (...)
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  19. Roman Frydman & Edmund S. Phelps (eds.) (1986). Individual Forecasting and Aggregate Outcomes: 'Rational Expectations' Examined. Cambridge University Press.
    Growing out of a conference on Expectations Formation and Economic Disequilibrium held in New York City in 1981, the papers in this volume provide a complex view of market processes in which individual rationality is no guarantee of convergence to the 'correct' model and the equilibrium coordination of agents' plans. They reject the 'optimality' argument for the rational expectations hypothesis, opening the door to other hypotheses of optimal expectations of agents in the decentralized market economy.
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  20. Roman Frydman & Edmund S. Phelps (eds.) (2012). Individual Forecasting and Aggregate Outcomes: 'Rational Expectations' Examined. Cambridge University Press.
    Growing out of a conference on Expectations Formation and Economic Disequilibrium held in New York City in 1981, the papers in this volume provide a complex view of market processes in which individual rationality is no guarantee of convergence to the 'correct' model and the equilibrium coordination of agents' plans. They reject the 'optimality' argument for the rational expectations hypothesis, opening the door to other hypotheses of optimal expectations of agents in the decentralized market economy.
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  21.  43
    Rajib Sanyal (2005). Determinants of Bribery in International Business: The Cultural and Economic Factors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):139 - 145.
    Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) scores for 47 countries reported by Transparency International were used to ascertain determinants of bribe taking in international business. Two sets of independent variables – economic and cultural – were used in a multiple regression analysis. Results indicate that bribe taking was more likely to be prevalent in countries with low per capita income and lower disparities in income distribution. Cultural factors such as high power distance and high masculinity in a country were also likely (...)
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  22.  15
    Nuttaneeya Ann Torugsa, Wayne O'Donohue & Rob Hecker (2013). Proactive CSR: An Empirical Analysis of the Role of its Economic, Social and Environmental Dimensions on the Association Between Capabilities and Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):383-402.
    Proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR) involves business practices adopted voluntarily by firms that go beyond regulatory requirements in order to actively support sustainable economic, social and environmental development, and thereby contribute broadly and positively to society. This empirical study examines the role of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of proactive CSR on the association between three specific capabilities—shared vision, stakeholder management and strategic proactivity—and financial performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Using quantitative data collected from a (...)
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  23.  17
    Olivier Massin & Emma Tieffenbach (forthcoming). The Metaphysics of Economic Exchanges. Journal of Social Ontology.
    What are economic exchanges? The received view has it that exchanges are mutual transfers of goods motivated by inverse valuations thereof. As a corollary, the standard approach treats exchanges of services as a subspecies of exchanges of goods. We raise two objections against this standard approach. First, it is incomplete, as it fails to take into account, among other things, the offers and acceptances that lie at the core of even the simplest cases of exchanges. Second, it ultimately fails (...)
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  24. Jeppe von Platz (2014). Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights? Politics, Philosophy, and Economics 13 (1):23-44.
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and discuss (...)
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  25.  13
    Sylvia Maxfield (2008). Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367 - 377.
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off between competitive (...)
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  26.  42
    Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto (2005). An Economic Approach to Business Ethics: Moral Agency of the Firm and the Enabling and Constraining Effects of Economic Institutions and Interactions in a Market Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):75 - 89.
    The paper maps out an alternative to a behavioural (economic) approach to business ethics. Special attention is paid to the fundamental philosophical principle that any moral ‘ought’ implies a practical ‘can’, which the paper interprets with regard to the economic viability of moral agency of the firm under the conditions of the market economy, in particular competition. The paper details an economic understanding of business ethics with regard to classical and neo-classical views, on the one hand, and (...)
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  27.  23
    Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto (2007). Moral Agency, Profits and the Firm: Economic Revisions to the Friedman Theorem. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):209 - 220.
    The paper reconstructs in economic terms Friedman's theorem that the only social responsibility of firms is to increase their profits while staying within legal and ethical rules. A model of three levels of moral conduct is attributed to the firm: (1) self-interested engagement in the market process itself, which reflects according to classical and neoclassical economics an ethical ideal; (2) the obeying of the "rules of the game," largely legal ones; and (3) the creation of ethical capital, which allows (...)
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  28.  15
    X. H. Meng, S. X. Zeng & C. M. Tam (2013). From Voluntarism to Regulation: A Study on Ownership, Economic Performance and Corporate Environmental Information Disclosure in China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):217-232.
    This article examines whether economic performance could affect EID and how the relationship is determined by the form of ownership from voluntarism to regulation under the current Chinese context. In this study, our empirical results show that the relationship between firms’ performance and EID is complex and the interactive impact of ownership and economic performance on EID significantly varies from voluntary disclosure to mandatory disclosure. This study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the motivations in corporate EID. The (...)
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  29.  3
    Christos N. Pitelis (2013). Towards a More 'Ethically Correct' Governance for Economic Sustainability. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):655-665.
    In this paper, we propose that economic sustainability is seen in terms of (inter-temporal and inter-national) value creation. We claim that value appropriation (or capture), can become a constraint to economic sustainability. We propose that for sustainable value creation to be fostered, corporate governance needs to be aligned to public and supra-national governance. In order to achieve this, a hierarchically layered set of ‘agencies’, needs to be diagnosed and the issue of incentive alignment addressed. Enlightened self-interest, pluralism and (...)
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  30. Martin O'Neill (2008). Three Rawlsian Routes Towards Economic Democracy. Revue de Philosophie Économique 9 (1):29-55.
    This paper addresses ways of arguing fors ome form of economic democracy from within a broadly Rawlsian framework. Firstly, one can argue that a right to participate in economic decision-making should be added to the Rawlsian list of basic liberties, protected by the first principle of justice. Secondly,I argue that a society which institutes forms of economic democracy will be more likely to preserve a stable and just basic structure over time, by virtue of the effects of (...)
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  31.  27
    Justine Nolan & Luke Taylor (2009). Corporate Responsibility for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Rights in Search of a Remedy? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):433 - 451.
    It is no longer a revelation that companies have some responsibility to uphold human rights. However, delineating the boundaries of the relationship between business and human rights is more vexed. What is it that we are asking corporations to assume responsibility for and how far does that responsibility extend? This article focuses on the extent to which economic, social and cultural rights fall within a corporation's sphere of responsibility. It then analyses how corporations may be held accountable for violations (...)
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  32.  37
    Augustine Nwabuzor (2005). Corruption and Development: New Initiatives in Economic Openness and Strengthened Rule of Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):121 - 138.
    Corruption is a major problem in many of the world’s developing economies today. World Bank studies put bribery at over $1 trillion per year accounting for up to 12 of the GDP of nations like Nigeria, Kenya and Venezuela. Though largely ignored for many years, interest in world wide corruption has been rekindled by recent corporate scandals in the US and Europe. Corruption in the developing nations is said to result from a number of factors. Mass poverty has been cited (...)
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  33. D. Wade Hands (2001). Reflection Without Rules: Economic Methodology and Contemporary Science Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Reflection without rules is a detailed interpretative survey of recent work in economic methodology and various developments in philosophy of science and science studies relevant to it.
     
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  34.  28
    Tierney Bondy & Vishal Talwar (2011). Through Thick and Thin: How Fair Trade Consumers Have Reacted to the Global Economic Recession. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):365-383.
    Research on fair trade has flourished over the past decade as fair trade food products have gained popularity amongst consumers in many developed economies. This study examines the effects of recessionary economic conditions on fair trade consumers’ purchasing behaviour. An online survey was administered to 306 fair trade consumers from Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The results reveal a discrepancy among fair trade consumers as only consumers that purchase fair trade on an occasional basis (...)
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  35. Brian P. Simpson (2009). Wealth and Income Inequality: An Economic and Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):525 - 538.
    I perform an economic and ethical analysis on wealth and income inequality. Economists have performed many statistical studies that reveal a number of, often contradictory, findings in connection with the distribution of wealth and income. Hence, the statistical findings leave us with no better knowledge of the effects that inequality has on economic progress. At the same time, the existing theoretical results have not provided us with a definitive answer concerning the effects of inequality on progress. By gaining (...)
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  36.  70
    D. Wade Hands (1990). Thirteen Theses on Progress in Economic Methodology. Finnish Economic Papers 3:72-76.
  37.  95
    Natalie Gold, Briony Pulford & Andrew Colman (2013). Your Money Or Your Life: Comparing Judgements In Trolley Problems Involving Economic And Emotional Harms, Injury And Death. Economics and Philosophy 29 (02):213-233.
    There is a long-standing debate in philosophy about whether it is morally permissible to harm one person in order to prevent a greater harm to others and, if not, what is the moral principle underlying the prohibition. Hypothetical moral dilemmas are used in order to probe moral intuitions. Philosophers use them to achieve a reflective equilibrium between intuitions and principles, psychologists to investigate moral decision-making processes. In the dilemmas, the harms that are traded off are almost always deaths. However, the (...)
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  38.  10
    Lorenzo Patelli & Matteo Pedrini (2013). Is the Optimism in CEO's Letters to Shareholders Sincere? Impression Management Versus Communicative Action During the Economic Crisis. Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-16.
    In this study, we explore the sincerity of the rhetorical tone of 664 annual letters to shareholders (CEO letters). Prior studies adopt Impression Management theory to predict that firms obfuscate failures and emphasize successes to unfairly enhance their image and maintain organizational legitimacy. Yuthas et al. (J Bus Ethics 41:141–157, 2002) challenged such a view, showing that firms reporting earnings surprises engage in ethical discourse with shareholders. We adopt the methodology of Yuthas et al. (J Bus Ethics 41:141–157, 2002) to (...)
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  39.  69
    Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (2015). Economic Rationality and the Optimization Trap. St. Gallen Business Review 2015 (1):12-17.
    The theme of this issue of the St. Gallen Business Review is "Harmony". For this reason, we would like to discuss whether two aspects of our life- world are in harmony, namely economic optimization and morality. What is the relation between them? According to a widely shared view, which is one aspect of the doctrine of "mainstream economics", the functioning of an economic system does not require moral behaviour on the part of the individual economic agent. In (...)
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  40.  4
    Roberto Fumagalli (forthcoming). On the Neural Enrichment of Economic Models: Recasting the Challenge. Biology and Philosophy:1-20.
    In a recent article in this Journal, Fumagalli argues that economists are provisionally justified in resisting prominent calls to integrate neural variables into economic models of choice. In other articles, various authors engage with Fumagalli’s argument and try to substantiate three often-made claims concerning neuroeconomic modelling. First, the benefits derivable from neurally informing some economic models of choice do not involve significant tractability costs. Second, neuroeconomic modelling is best understood within Marr’s three-level of analysis framework for information-processing systems. (...)
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  41.  11
    Walton Padelford & Darin W. White (2009). The Shaping of a Society's Economic Ethos: A Longitudinal Study of Individuals' Morality of Profit-Making Worldview. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):67 - 75.
    This study investigates the processes involved in the shaping of a society’s economic ethos. The discussion of ethics and economics has a very long history across multiple disciplines. The founder of modern economics, Adam Smith, likewise had a keen interest in this topic. However, with the development of economic science, scholarly assessment has shifted toward positive analysis while normative analysis has been left mainly to philosophers. By utilizing the newly developed morality of profit-making scale (MPM), the authors sought (...)
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  42.  1
    Uskali Mäki (ed.) (2001). The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press.
    The beliefs of economists are not solely determined by empirical evidence in direct relation to the theories and models they hold. Economists hold 'ontological presuppositions', fundamental ideas about the nature of being which direct their thinking about economic behaviour. In this volume, leading philosophers and economists examine these hidden presuppositions, searching for a 'world view' of economics. What properties are attributed to human individuals in economic theories, and which are excluded? Does economic man exist? Do markets have (...)
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  43.  20
    Lawrence R. Cima & Thomas L. Schubeck (2001). Self-Interest, Love, and Economic Justice: A Dialogue Between Classical Economic Liberalism and Catholic Social Teaching. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):213 - 231.
    This essay seeks to start a dialogue between two traditions that historically have interpreted the economy in opposing ways: the individualism of classic economic liberalism (CEL), represented by Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, and the communitarianism of Catholic social teaching (CST), interpreted primarily through the teachings of popes and secondarily the U.S. Catholic bishops. The present authors, an economist and a moral theologian who identify with one or the other of the two traditions, strive to clarify objectively their similarities (...)
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  44.  12
    James J. Hoffman, Grantham Couch & Bruce T. Lamont (1998). The Effect of Firm Profit Versus Personal Economic Well Being on the Level of Ethical Responses Given by Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (3):239-244.
    Members of organizations are continually making decisions that have important consequences for themselves and the firms for which they work. In some cases these decisions affect human well being and social welfare and thus have important ethical impacts for those affected by the decisions.This study examines if certain strategic situations (enhancement of firm profits versus personal economic well being) cause decision makers to act more or less ethically. A questionnaire consisting of two vignettes which depicted actual business situations was (...)
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  45.  23
    Evert Van de Vliert (2013). Climato-Economic Habitats Support Patterns of Human Needs, Stresses, and Freedoms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):465 - 480.
    This paper examines why fundamental freedoms are so unevenly distributed across the earth. Climato-economic theorizing proposes that humans adapt needs, stresses, and choices of goals, means, and outcomes to the livability of their habitat. The evolutionary process at work is one of collectively meeting climatic demands of cold winters or hot summers by using monetary resources. Freedom is expected to be lowest in poor populations threatened by demanding thermal climates, intermediate in populations comforted by undemanding temperate climates irrespective of (...)
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  46.  17
    Leslie A. Duram (2000). Agents' Perceptions of Structure: How Illinois Organic Farmers View Political, Economic, Social, and Ecological Factors. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):35-48.
    Various structural factors influenceorganic farmer decision-making. Analyses that combinestructure and agency provide an opportunity forunderstanding farmers' perceptions of the political,economic, and social ``world'' in which they operate.Rich conversational interviews, conducted with twentycertified organic farmers in Illinois and analyzedwith multiple qualitative methods, show how farmersmediate structural concerns. In addition to political,economic, and social structures, a fourth structure isneeded. Indeed these organic farmers emphasize theimportance of ecological factors in theirdecision-making. Within the perceived economic,political, social, and ecological structures, numeroustopics (i.e., (...)
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  47.  11
    Jovan Babić & Aleksandar Jokic (2002). Economic Sanctions, Morality and Escalation of Demands on Yugoslavia. International Peackeeping (No. 4):119-127.
    Economic sanctions are envisaged as a sort of punishment, based on what should be an institutional decision not unlike a court ruling. Hence, the conditions for their lifting should be clearly stated and once those are met sanctions should be lifted. But this is generally not what happens, and perhaps is precluded by the very nature of international sanctioning. Sanctions clearly have political, economic, military and strategic consequences, but the question raised here is whether sanctions can also have (...)
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  48.  5
    Alison Kraft (2004). Pragmatism, Patronage and Politics in English Biology: The Rise and Fall of Economic Biology 1904-1920. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (2):213 - 258.
    The rise of applied biology was one of the most striking features of the biological sciences in the early 20th century. Strongly oriented toward agriculture, this was closely associated with the growth of a number of disciplines, notably, entomology and mycology. This period also saw a marked expansion of the English University system, and biology departments in the newly inaugurated civic universities took an early and leading role in the development of applied biology through their support of Economic Biology. (...)
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  49.  10
    S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining (...)
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  50.  3
    John Tsalikis (2011). The Business Ethics Index as a Leading Economic Indicator. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):519 - 653.
    Theoretical justification for the Business Ethics Index (BEI) from the emerging economics of trust literature is discussed. The BEI results for 2007, 2008, and 2009 are presented. While the Personal/Past BEI component shows no significant difference from the previous years, the Vicarious/Past component shows a dramatic drop to levels previously never recorded.However, when it came to the perception of the future business ethical behavior, respondents were significantly more optimistic than in previous measurements.This finding was more than a little surprising given (...)
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