Search results for 'Economic history' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    William H. Sewell (2012). What's Wrong with Economic History? History and Theory 51 (3):466-476.
    ABSTRACTIn this polemical book, Francesco Boldizzoni argues that economic history is so moribund as to require resurrection. He maintains that economic history has been converted into a subfield of economics and has embraced the antihistorical and a priori intellectual style of mainstream economics departments: it has, in effect, ceased to be a form of history. Boldizzoni hopes to force a recognition of contemporary economic history's bankruptcy and to show the way toward a revitalization.He (...)
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  2.  15
    Albino Barrera (1999). The Evolution of Social Ethics: Using Economic History to Understand Economic Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):285 - 304.
    In the development of Roman Catholic social thought from the teachings of the scholastics to the modern social encyclicals, changes in normative economics reflect the transformation of an economic terrain from its feudal roots to the modern industrial economy. The preeminence accorded by the modern market to the allocative over the distributive function of price broke the convenient convergence of commutative and distributive justice in scholastic just price theory. Furthermore, the loss of custom, law, and usage in defining the (...)
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  3.  16
    Filippo Cesarano (2006). Economic History and Economic Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (4):447-467.
    Since the mid?1950s the spread of formal models and econometric method has greatly improved the study of the past, giving rise to the ?new? economic history; at the same time, the influence of economic history on economists and economics has markedly declined. This paper argues that the contribution of history to the advancement of economics is still paramount, as is evident from the evolution of monetary theory and institutions.JEL classification: NO1, A12.
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  4. Geerat J. Vermeij (2006). Nature: An Economic History. Princeton University Press.
    From humans to hermit crabs to deep water plankton, all living things compete for locally limiting resources. This universal truth unites three bodies of thought--economics, evolution, and history--that have developed largely in mutual isolation. Here, Geerat Vermeij undertakes a groundbreaking and provocative exploration of the facts and theories of biology, economics, and geology to show how processes common to all economic systems--competition, cooperation, adaptation, and feedback--govern evolution as surely as they do the human economy, and how historical patterns (...)
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  5.  7
    Edward Saraydar (1989). The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History. Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):55.
    The literature of comparative economics as well as economic history is replete with references to productivity differences as reflecting relative efficiency in production. In socialist economics, for example, the longevity of the relative-productivity/relative-efficiency theme is apparent from Abram Bergson's early survey where, commenting on a productivity debate that had already been going on for over twenty years, he identified “the only issue outstanding” as the question “which is more efficient, socialism or capitalism?” The issue has continued to be (...)
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  6.  64
    Eric S. Schliesser, Prophecy, Eclipses and Whole-Sale Markets: A Case Study on Why Data Driven Economic History Requires History of Economics, a Philosopher's Reflection.
    In this essay, I use a general argument about the evidential role of data in ongoing inquiry to show that it is fruitful for economic historians and historians of economics to collaborate more frequently. The shared aim of this collaboration should be to learn from past economic experience in order to improve the cutting edge of economic theory. Along the way, I attack a too rigorous distinction between the history of economics and economic history. (...)
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  7.  12
    David W. Tandy (2009). The Cambridge Economic History of the Greco-Roman World (Review). American Journal of Philology 130 (2):299-303.
    Douglass North is the hero of this project. He is an Americanist economic historian who was awarded the 1993 Nobel Prize in Economics "for having renewed research in economic history by applying economic theory and quantitative methods in order to explain economic and institutional change" . Can it be that North has rescued scholars from the formalist/substantivist, modernizer/primitivist debates that have been distracting the study of the ancient economies for more than a hundred years? The (...)
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  8.  6
    J. Velásquez Runk, Gervacio Ortíz Negría, Wilio Quintero García & Cristobalino Quiróz Ismare (2007). Political Economic History, Culture, and Wounaan Livelihood Diversity in Eastern Panama. Agriculture and Human Values 24 (1):93-106.
    A growing literature on scholarly and practical approaches to conservation and development uses a livelihood approach to understand rural peoples’ diverse assets and activities, especially as they serve to minimize vulnerability to economic and ecological shocks. In recent years, the suite of potential assets available to rural households has been theorized as human, natural, physical, social, and cultural capitals and includes the context in which they are used. Here we explore Wounaan livelihood strategies and how they articulate with the (...)
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  9.  11
    Stanley L. Engerman (1980). III. Counterfactuals and the New Economic History. Inquiry 23 (2):157 – 172.
    In discussing Elster's views on the use of counterfactuals and on the nature of contradictions in society, it is contended that, in general, these will not seem especially controversial to those trained in neoclassical economics. Similarly, there is little disagreement in principle between the views of many 'new economic historians' and Elster on the use of counterfactuals in the study of historical problems. In evaluating Elster's critique of several applications of counterfactuals in the 'new economic history', it (...)
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  10. Carlo Maria Flumiani (1978). The Economic Philosophy of History & the Science of Maximal Prediction. American Classical College Press.
     
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  11. Charles P. Kindleberger (1997). Economic Laws and Economic History. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, Charles Kindleberger makes a powerful case against the idea that any one model could be used to unlock the basic secret of economic history. It is essentially an exercise in methodology, addressed to economists and economic historians alike. He argues that too many economists discover a relationship or a uniformity in economic behaviour, develop a model, and use it to explain more than it is capable of, including, on occasion, all economic behaviour. (...)
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  12. Charles P. Kindleberger (2009). Economic Laws and Economic History. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, Charles Kindleberger makes a powerful case against the idea that any one model could be used to unlock the basic secret of economic history. It is essentially an exercise in methodology, addressed to economists and economic historians alike. He argues that too many economists discover a relationship or a uniformity in economic behaviour, develop a model, and use it to explain more than it is capable of, including, on occasion, all economic behaviour. (...)
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  13. Gerard M. Koot (2008). English Historical Economics, 1870–1926: The Rise of Economic History and Neomercantilism. Cambridge University Press.
    In the first comprehensive and full-length study of the English historical economists, Gerard Koot traces their revolt against the theory, policy recommendations and academic dominance of classical and neoclassical economics in Britain between 1870 and 1926. English Historical Economics, 1870–1926 shows how these historical critics challenged the deductive method and mechanistic assumptions of the economic orthodoxy, developing an historical and inductive method for economic studies and laying the foundation for the professional study of economic history. The (...)
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  14.  54
    D. Wade Hands (1997). Conjectures and Reputations:The Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and the History of Economic Thought. History of Political Economy 29:695-739.
  15. Richard A. Easterlin (2004). The Reluctant Economist: Perspectives on Economics, Economic History, and Demography. Cambridge University Press.
    Where is rapid economic growth taking us? Why has its spread throughout the world been so limited? What are the causes of the great twentieth century advance in life expectancy? Of the revolution in childbearing that is bringing fertility worldwide to near replacement levels? Have free markets been the source of human improvement? Economics provides a start on these questions, but only a start, argues economist Richard A. Easterlin. To answer them calls for merging economics with concepts and data (...)
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  16. Richard A. Easterlin (2004). The Reluctant Economist: Perspectives on Economics, Economic History, and Demography. Cambridge University Press.
    Where is rapid economic growth taking us? Why has its spread throughout the world been so limited? What are the causes of the great twentieth century advance in life expectancy? Of the revolution in childbearing that is bringing fertility worldwide to near replacement levels? Have free markets been the source of human improvement? Economics provides a start on these questions, but only a start, argues economist Richard A. Easterlin. To answer them calls for merging economics with concepts and data (...)
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  17.  5
    Janet Lippman Abu-Lughod (1995). The World-System Perspective in the Construction of Economic History. History and Theory 34 (2):86-98.
    This essay examines the experience of rewriting historical narratives from a world-system perspective, drawing on the author's attempt to construct an integrated image of the world economy in the thirteenth century. Searching for an intermediate epistemological path between unanchored postmodern hermeneutics and overconfident positivism, the author argues that three apparent deviations from the "ideals of positivist social science," which she ironically labels eccentricity, ideology, and idiosyncrasy, can yield significant "remakings" of world history. Eccentricity, namely, recognizing perspectives other than those (...)
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  18. Christopher Adair-Toteff (2013). Capitalism and Criticism Weber on Economic History. History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):128-139.
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  19.  83
    Richard J. Smith (1989). Reviews : D. C. Coleman, History and the Economic Past: An Account of the Rise and Decline of Economic History in Britain, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987, £17.50, 150 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (2):269-271.
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  20.  81
    Jack A. Goldstone (2000). The Rise of the West-or Not? A Revision to Socio-Economic History. Sociological Theory 18 (2):175-194.
    The debate over the "Rise of the West" has generally been over which factor or factors-cultural, geoographic, or material-in European history led Europe to diverge from the World's pre-industrial civilizations. This article aims to shift the terms of the debate by arguing that there were no causal factors that made Europe's industrialization inevitable or even likely. Rather, most of Europe would not and could not move toward industrialization any more than China or India or Japan. Rather, a very accidental (...)
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  21.  15
    Konrad Fuchs (1984). Mendelssohn Studies. Contributions on Modern German Cultural and Economic History, Vol. Philosophy and History 17 (2):171-172.
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  22.  13
    Konrad Fuchs (1991). The Importance of Communication for Business and Society. Papers Given at the 12th Working Congress of the Society for Social and Economic History on 22–25. 4. 1987. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 24 (1/2):103-105.
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  23.  13
    Konrad Fuchs (1980). Power Elites and Economic Cycles. Studies in Modern German Social and Economic History. Philosophy and History 13 (1):91-92.
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  24.  8
    John Vincent Nye (1990). “The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History”: A Comment. Economics and Philosophy 6 (1):147.
    In a recent article, Edward Saraydar takes economists and economic historians to task for equating productivity and efficiency in comparative economic analysis. Although I found his thesis interesting, I was a bit surprised to see selected remarks from my article on firm size in nineteenth-century France used to frame his criticism of productivity comparisons as a means of making prescriptive statements. The passages selected may mislead the reader as to the nature of my arguments. Let me quote Saraydar (...)
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  25.  8
    Konrad Fuchs (1986). Economic History of the Federal Republic of Germany. Philosophy and History 19 (1):61-62.
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  26.  4
    Wang Jiafan (2011). The Challenges to the Study of Chinese Economic History. Chinese Studies in History 45 (1):52-68.
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  27.  6
    Joachim Thiel (1983). Social and Economic History of Imperial Rome. Philosophy and History 16 (2):180-182.
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  28.  1
    Jacob M. Landau (1977). Hebrew Sources for the Socio Economic History of the Ottoman Empire. Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 54 (2).
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  29.  5
    Konrad Fuchs (1975). An Economic History of Austria in the Context of European Social History. Philosophy and History 8 (2):299-300.
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  30.  4
    A. Comment (1990). The Conflation of Productivity and Efficiency in Economics and Economic History. Economics and Philosophy 6:147-152.
    In a recent article, Edward Saraydar (1989) takes economists and economic historians to task for equating productivity and efficiency in comparative economic analysis. Although I found his thesis interesting, I was a bit surprised to see selected remarks from my article on firm size in nineteenth-century France (Nye,1987) used to frame his criticism of productivity comparisons as a means of making prescriptive statements. The passages selected may mislead the reader as to the nature of my arguments. Let me (...)
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  31.  4
    Long Denggao (2011). New Explorations in the Comparative Study of Economic History in China and the West. Chinese Studies in History 45 (1):7-27.
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  32.  4
    Friedrich-Wilhelm Henning (1986). The Economic History of Upper Silesia 1871–1945. Philosophy and History 19 (1):52-53.
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  33.  2
    Eric L. Jones (1982). Economic History at the Species Level. History of European Ideas 3 (1):95-105.
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  34.  8
    David K. Goodin (2010). Social Insecurity and the No-Avail Thesis: Insights From Philosophy and Economic History on Consumerist Behavior. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):15 – 18.
    Chrisoula Andreou argues that the predominant factor in the exalted and worldly views of human thriving involves a psychological measure of relative deprivation or advantage in relation to social competitors. This is the 'no avail' thesis: promoting self-sacrifice for the sake of conservation, in-and-of-itself, will remain ineffective as environmental policy. However, Andreou sets aside, to some extent, the applicability of philosophical discourse on happiness and human thriving, which is where this commentary is directed. Specifically, Aristotle's insights on social prestige (exousia) (...)
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  35.  2
    William N. Parker (1992). A Social and Economic History of Twentieth-Century Europe. History of European Ideas 14 (4):600-602.
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  36.  1
    Roger Munting (1990). Arcadius Kahan, Russian Economic History. The Nineteenth Century. History of European Ideas 12 (3):432-433.
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  37. Kenneth E. Boulding (1971). E. J. HOBSBAWM, "Industry and Empire: An Economic History of Britain Since 1750". [REVIEW] History and Theory 10 (1):147.
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  38. Kenneth E. Boulding & E. J. Hobsbawm (1971). Industry and Empire: An Economic History of Britain Since 1750. History and Theory 10 (1):147.
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  39. David Braybrooke & Peter D. McClelland (1977). Causal Explanation and Model Building in History, Economics, and the New Economic History. History and Theory 16 (3):337.
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  40. David Braybrooke (1977). PETER D. MCCLELLAND, "Causal Explanation and Model Building in History, Economics, and the New Economic History". [REVIEW] History and Theory 16 (3):337.
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  41. P. M. Rattansi (1968). Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries The Cambridge Economic History of Europe: Vol. IV, The Economy of Expanding Europe in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Edited by E. E. Rich and C. H. Wilson. London: Cambridge University Press. 1967. Pp. Xxxii + 642. 75s. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 4 (2):189.
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  42. P. M. Rattansi (1968). The Cambridge Economic History of Europe: Vol. IV, The Economy of Expanding Europe in the 16th and 17th Centuries. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 4 (2):189-190.
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  43. György Ránki (1970). Some Problems of the Connection Between Technical Development and Economic History. In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York,Plenum Press 311--320.
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  44. Margaret Schabas (1988). Economic History and the History of Economics by Mark Blaug. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 79 (4):714-715.
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  45. Michael Shute (2010). 3. Reading Economic History. In Lonergan's Early Economic Research: Texts and Commentary. University of Toronto Press 72-101.
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  46. C. A. O. van Nieuwenhuijze & Charles Issawi (1968). The Economic History of the Middle East, 1800-1914. History and Theory 7 (3):377.
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  47.  32
    Friedrich Baerwald (1940). Economic History of Europe Since the Reformation. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):159-160.
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  48.  10
    Matthew S. Hobson (forthcoming). The state of continental ancient economic history. C. apicella, M.-l. Haack, F. lerouxel Les affaires de monsieur andreau. Économie et société du monde Romain. Pp. 315, ill., Maps. Bordeaux: Ausonius éditions, 2014. Paper, €25. Isbn: 978-2-35613-108-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-3.
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  49.  42
    Phil Mullins (1994). Towards a Personal Knowledge of Economic History. Tradition and Discovery 21 (3):34-35.
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  50.  33
    J. F. O'Sullivan (1942). Cambridge Economic History of Europe. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):523-524.
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