Search results for 'Economics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Positive Economics & Milton Friedman (1979). 1. The Relation Between Positive and Normative Economics Confusion Between Positive and Normative Economics is to Some Extent Inevitable. The Subject Matter of Economics is Regarded by Almost Everyone From Essays in Positive Economics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953), Part I, Sections 1, 2, 3, and 6. [REVIEW] In Frank Hahn & Martin Hollis (eds.), Philosophy and Economic Theory. Oxford University Press. 18.score: 190.0
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  2. Century German Economics (2004). Karl Milford Inductivism in 19™ Century German Economics. In Friedrich Stadler (ed.), Induction and Deduction in the Sciences. Springer. 273.score: 120.0
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  3. Philippe Mongin (2006). A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.score: 27.0
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly (...)
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  4. Christine Clavien & Rebekka A. Klein (2010). Eager for Fairness or for Revenge? Psychological Altruism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):267-290.score: 27.0
    To understand the human capacity for psychological altruism, one requires a proper understanding of how people actually think and feel. This paper addresses the possible relevance of recent findings in experimental economics and neuroeconomics to the philosophical controversy over altruism and egoism. After briefly sketching and contextualizing the controversy, we survey and discuss the results of various studies on behaviourally altruistic helping and punishing behaviour, which provide stimulating clues for the debate over psychological altruism. On closer analysis, these studies (...)
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  5. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie (...)
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  6. Barry Smith (1994). The Philosophy of Austrian Economics. Review of Austrian Economics 7:127–132.score: 27.0
    Review of David Gordon, The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics (Auburn 1993).
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  7. Philippe Mongin (2006). Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics. Economica 73 (290):257-286.score: 24.0
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than the other (...)
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  8. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  9. Julie A. Nelson (2004). Clocks, Creation and Clarity: Insights on Ethics and Economics From a Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):381 - 398.score: 24.0
    This essay discusses the origins, biases, and effects on contemporary discussions of economics and ethics of the unexamined use of the metaphor an economy is a machine. Both neoliberal economics and many critiques of capitalist systems take this metaphor as their starting point. The belief that economies run according to universal laws of motion, however, is shown to be based on a variety of rationalist thinking that – while widely held – is inadequate for explaining lived human experience. (...)
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  10. Yew-Kwang Ng (1995). Towards Welfare Biology: Evolutionary Economics of Animal Consciousness and Suffering. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):255-285.score: 24.0
    Welfare biology is the study of living things and their environment with respect to their welfare (defined as net happiness, or enjoyment minus suffering). Despite difficulties of ascertaining and measuring welfare and relevancy to normative issues, welfare biology is a positive science. Evolutionary economics and population dynamics are used to help answer basic questions in welfare biology: Which species are affective sentients capable of welfare? Do they enjoy positive or negative welfare? Can their welfare be dramatically increased? Under plausible (...)
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  11. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Climate Change, Nuclear Economics, and Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):75-107.score: 24.0
    Merck suppressed data on harmful effects of its drug Vioxx, and Guidant suppressed data on electrical flaws in one of its heart-defibrillator models. Both cases reveal how financial conflicts of interest can skew biomedical research. Such conflicts also occur in electric-utility-related research. Attempting to show that increased atomic energy can help address climate change, some industry advocates claim nuclear power is an inexpensive way to generate low-carbon electricity. Surveying 30 recent nuclear analyses, this paper shows that industry-funded studies appear to (...)
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  12. Tony Lawson (1997). Economics and Reality. Routledge.score: 24.0
    There is an increasingly widespread belief, both within and outside the discipline, that modern economics is irrelevant to the understanding of the real world. Economics and Reality traces this irrelevance to the failure of economists to match their methods with their subject, showing that formal, mathematical models are unsuitable to the social realities economists purport to address. Tony Lawson examines the various ways in which mainstream economics is rooted in positivist philosophy and examines the problems this causes. (...)
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  13. Vernon L. Smith (2008). Rationality in Economics: Constructivist and Ecological Forms. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The principal findings of experimental economics are that impersonal exchange in markets converges in repeated interaction to the equilibrium states implied by economic theory, under information conditions far weaker than specified in the theory. In personal, social, and economic exchange, as studied in two-person games, cooperation exceeds the prediction of traditional game theory. This book relates these two findings to field studies and applications and integrates them with the main themes of the Scottish Enlightenment and with the thoughts of (...)
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  14. D. Bruce Johnsen (2009). The Ethics of "Commercial Bribery": Integrative Social Contract Theory Meets Transaction Cost Economics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):791 - 803.score: 24.0
    This article provides an ISCT analysis of commercial bribery focused on transaction cost economics. In the language of Antitrust, commercial bribery is a form of vertical arrangement subject to the same efficiency analysis that has found other vertical arrangements potentially beneficial to consumers. My analysis shows that actions condemned as commerical bribery in the Honda case (1996) may well have benefited Honda's dealer network once promotional free riding and other forms of rent seeking by dealers are considered. I propose (...)
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  15. Denis Phan & Franck Varenne (2010). Agent-Based Models and Simulations in Economics and Social Sciences: From Conceptual Exploration to Distinct Ways of Experimenting. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 13 (1).score: 24.0
    Now that complex Agent-Based Models and computer simulations spread over economics and social sciences - as in most sciences of complex systems -, epistemological puzzles (re)emerge. We introduce new epistemological concepts so as to show to what extent authors are right when they focus on some empirical, instrumental or conceptual significance of their model or simulation. By distinguishing between models and simulations, between types of models, between types of computer simulations and between types of empiricity obtained through a simulation, (...)
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  16. Alexander Rosenberg (1992). Economics: Mathematical Politics or Science of Diminishing Returns? University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Economics today cannot predict the likely outcome of specific events any better than it could in the time of Adam Smith. This is Alexander Rosenberg's controversial challenge to the scientific status of economics. Rosenberg explains that the defining characteristic of any science is predictive improvability--the capacity to create more precise forecasts by evaluating the success of earlier predictions--and he forcefully argues that because economics has not been able to increase its predictive power for over two centuries, it (...)
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  17. Harold Kincaid & Don Ross (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics is a cutting-edge reference work to philosophical issues in the practice of economics. It is motivated by the view that there is more to economics than general equilibrium theory, and that the philosophy of economics should reflect the diversity of activities and topics that currently occupy economists. Contributions in the Handbook are thus closely tied to ongoing theoretical and empirical concerns in economics. Contributors include both philosophers of science (...)
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  18. Gustavo Cevolani (2011). Hayek in the Lab. Austrian School, Game Theory, and Experimental Economics. Logic and Philosophy of Science 9 (1):429-436.score: 24.0
    Focusing on the work of Friedrich von Hayek and Vernon Smith, we discuss some conceptual links between Austrian economics and recent work in behavioral game theory and experimental economics. After a brief survey of the main methodological aspects of Austrian and experimental economics, we suggest that common views on subjectivism, individualism, and the role of qualitative explanations and predictions in social science may favour a fruitful interaction between these two research programs.
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  19. Peter Koslowski (ed.) (1985). Economics and Philosophy. J.C.B. Mohr.score: 24.0
    Philosophy and Economics An Introduction PETER KOSLOWSKI Philosophy and economics are both children of the same Greek spirit of rationalization of world ...
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  20. John Broome (1999). Ethics Out of Economics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Many economic problems are also ethical problems: should we value economic equality? how much should we care about preserving the environment? how should medical resources be divided between saving life and enhancing life? This book examines some of the practical issues that lie between economics and ethics, and shows how utility theory can contribute to ethics. John Broome's work has, unusually, combined sophisticated economic and philosophical expertise, and Ethics Out of Economics brings together some of his most important (...)
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  21. Benedetta Giovanola (2009). Re-Thinking the Anthropological and Ethical Foundation of Economics and Business: Human Richness and Capabilities Enhancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):431 - 444.score: 24.0
    This article aims at showing the need for a sound ethical and anthropological foundation of economics and business, and argues the importance of a correct understanding of human values and human nature for the sake of economics and of businesses themselves. It is suggested that the ethical-anthropological side of economics and business can be grasped by taking Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA) as major reference points. We hold that an “Aristotelian economics of (...)
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  22. Daniel M. Hausman (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  23. J. J. Graafland (2005). Economics, Ethics and the Market: Introduction and Applications. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The primary aim of the text is to introduce the reader to the relationship between economics and ethics and to the application of economic ethics in the evaluation of the market. The reader will gain insight into: * The ethical and methodological strategy of economics and criticism of the core assumptions that underpin the economic defense of free market operation. * The characteristics of different ethical theories (utilitarianism, duty and rights ethics, justice and virtue ethics) that can be (...)
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  24. Michael Moehler & Geoffrey Brennan (2010). Neoclassical Economics. In Mark Bevir (ed.), Encyclopedia of Political Theory. SAGE Publications.score: 24.0
    The term neoclassical economics delineates a distinct and relatively homogenous school of thought in economic theory that became prominent in the late nineteenth century and that now dominates mainstream economics. The term was originally introduced by Thorstein Veblen to describe developments in the discipline (of which Veblen did not entirely approve) associated with the work of such figures as William Jevons, Carl Menger, and Leon Walras. The ambition of these figures, the first neoclassicists, was to formalize and mathematize (...)
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  25. Eric Schliesser (2012). Four Species of Reflexivity and History of Economics in Economic Policy Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):425-445.score: 24.0
    Abstract This paper argues that history of economics has a fruitful, underappreciated role to play in the development of economics, especially when understood as a policy science. This goes against the grain of the last half century during which economics, which has undergone a formal revolution, has distanced itself from its `literary' past and practices precisely with the aim to be a more successful policy science. The paper motivates the thesis by identifying and distinguishing four kinds of (...)
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  26. Jonathan Aldred (2009). The Skeptical Economist: Revealing the Ethics Inside Economics. Earthscan.score: 24.0
    Introduction : ethical economics? -- The sovereign consumer -- Two myths about economic growth -- The politics of pay -- Happiness -- Pricing life and nature -- New worlds of money : public services and beyond -- Conclusion.
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  27. Benjamin Balak (2006). Mccloskey's Rhetoric: Discourse Ethics in Economics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Deirdre McCloskey is rightly one of the most recognizable names in economics. She views economics as a language that uses all the rhetorical devices of everyday conversation and therefore it should be judged by aesthetic and literary standards and not the criteria of mathematical rigor that is espoused by the mainstream. This controversial standpoint has been hugely influential and this examination of the methodological and philosophical consequences of her work is overdue, and very welcome.
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  28. Christi Favor, Gerald F. Gaus & Julian Lamont (eds.) (2010). Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economics: Integration & Common Research Projects. Stanford Economics and Finance.score: 24.0
    "Essays on Philosophy, Politics, & Economics" offers a critical examination of economic, philosophical, and political notions, with an eye towards working ...
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  29. Susan Haack (2004). Science, Economics, 'Vision'. Social Research 71 (2):223-234.score: 24.0
    The focus here is Robert L. Heilbroner's critique, in the last chapter of the 7th edition of The Worldly Philosophers, of the idea that economics is, or should be, scientific. Heilbroner's conception of economics as essentially tied to capitalism is too narrow, and at odds with his own commentary on the rise of pauperism after the English common-land enclosures; and his critique of contemporary economics-as-social science is overdrawn. Nevertheless, there is indeed an important role for the “visionary” (...)
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  30. Michael Schwartz & Heath Spong (2009). Subjectivist Economics and Ethical Business. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):123 - 136.score: 24.0
    A number of business ethics theorist have highlighted the potential for economics to contribute to the advancement of business ethics. In response, this article emphasizes the insights of a particular area of economics that could provide such expansion and development. Subjectivist economics may yet provide an effective analytical framework through which to investigate and evaluate business decision making, and hence the ethics of business. Integrating the concepts of uncertainty, time and imagination, subjectivist economic theory contributes to a (...)
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  31. Donald L. Adolphson (2004). A New Perspective on Ethics, Ecology, and Economics. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (3):203 - 216.score: 24.0
    This paper introduces the important concept of a biophysical perspective on economics into the business ethics literature. The biophysical perspective recognizes that ecological processes determine what can be done in an economy and how best to do it. A biophysical perspective places the economic system into a larger context of the ecologic system. This changes the perception of ethical issues by identifying a larger scope of management decisions. The paper examines the changing ethical landscape in such issues as biotechnology, (...)
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  32. Steve Fleetwood (ed.) (1999). Critical Realism in Economics: Development and Debate. Routledge.score: 24.0
    There is a growing perception among economists that their field is becoming increasingly irrelevant due to its disregard for reality. Critical realism addresses the failure of mainstream economics to explain economic reality and proposes an alternative approach. This book debates the relative strengths and weaknesses of critical realism, in the hopes of developing a more fruitful and relevant socio-economic ontology and methodology. With contributions from some of the leading authorities in economic philosophy, it includes the work of theorists critical (...)
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  33. Paul Downward (ed.) (2003). Applied Economics and the Critical Realist Critique. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This intriguing new book examines and analyses the role of critical realism in economics and specifically how this line of thought can be applied to the real world. With contributions from such varying commentators as Sheila Dow, Wendy Olsen and Fred Lee, this new book is unique in its approach and will be of great interest to both economic methodologists and those involved in applied economic studies.
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  34. Jan Peil & Irene van Staveren (eds.) (2009). Handbook of Economics and Ethics. Edward Elgar.score: 24.0
    The Handbook of Economics and Ethics is a unique collection of 75 original entries on the intersections between economics and ethics.
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  35. Mark D. White (2011). Kantian Ethics and Economics: Autonomy, Dignity, and Character. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book introduces the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant—in particular, the concepts of autonomy, dignity, and character—to economic theory, explaining the importance of integrating these two streams of intellectual thought. Mainstream economics is rooted in classical utilitarianism, recommending that decision makers choose the options that are expected to generate the largest net benefits. For individuals, the standard economic model fails to incorporate the role of principles in decision-making, and also denies the possibility of true choice, which can be independent (...)
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  36. David-Hillel Ruben (1981). Philosophy of Economics By C. Dyke Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1981, 184 + Viii Pp., £5.15. Philosophy 56 (218):582-.score: 24.0
    review of Philosophy of Economics by C. Dyke.
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  37. Ian Malcolm David Little (2002). Ethics, Economics, and Politics: Principles of Public Policy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In Ethics, Economics, and Politics Ian Little returns to offer a new defence of a rule-based utilitarianism as a basis for assessing the role of the State. Lucidly and elegantly he explains how the three disiplines of philosophy, economics and politics can be integrated to provide guidance on issues of public policy.
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  38. James Maclaurin & Tim Cochrane (2012). Progress in Evolutionary Economics. Journal of Bioeconomics 14 (2):101-14.score: 24.0
    This paper develops an account of evolutionary progress for use in the field of evolutionary economics. Previous work is surveyed and a new account set out, based on the idea of evolvability as it has been used recently in evolutionary developmental biology. The biological underpinnings of this idea are explained using examples of a series of phenomena that influence the evolvability of biological systems. It is further argued that selection pressures and developmental processes are sufficiently similar to make this (...)
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  39. Edward Fullbrook (ed.) (2009). Ontology and Economics: Tony Lawson and His Critics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This original book brings together some of the world's leading critics of economics orthodoxy to debate Lawson's contribution to the economics literature.
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  40. Shriniwas Hemade (2013). Economics of Need and Economics of Want: A Distinction Essential: Prof. Barlingay's Account. Intellection : An Inter Disciplinary Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences : Peer Reviewed Journal. Vol I, Number 1, Januray-June 2013. ISSN: 2319-8192 (Januray-June 2013.):01-05.score: 24.0
    This research paper attempts to get pragmatic way to deal with few questions like, 'Will Indian Economic thoughts be able to give directions to crises-ridden global economic system?', 'Can India show solutions to the World's Present Socio-economical crises?'' and What are the Alternatives available before mankind to avoid economic crises?' The concept of economic exploitation or “exploitation” which has been the focal point of solemn philosophical debate is one of the favorite nouns in the glossary of critics of the free (...)
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  41. Allen Kaufman & Ernie Englander (2011). Behavioral Economics, Federalism, and the Triumph of Stakeholder Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):421-438.score: 24.0
    Stakeholder theorists distinguish between normative stakeholders, those who gain moral standing by making contributions to the firm, and derivative stakeholders, those who can constrain the corporate association even though they make no contribution. The board of directors has the legal authority to distinguish among these stakeholder groups and to distribute rights and obligations among these stakeholder groups. To be sure, this stakeholder formulation appropriately seizes on the firm’s voluntary, associative character. Yet, the firm’s constituents contribute assets and incur risks to (...)
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  42. Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.) (2012). Philosophy of Economics. North Holland.score: 24.0
    This volume serves as a detailed introduction for those new to the field as well as a rich source of new insights and potential research agendas for those already engaged with the philosophy of economics.
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  43. Peter Minowitz (1993). Profits, Priests, and Princes: Adam Smithʼs Emancipation of Economics From Politics and Religion. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    In launching modern economics, Adam Smith paved the way for laissez-faire capitalism, Marxism, and contemporary social science. This book scrutinizes Smith's disparagement of politics and religion to illuminate the subtlety of his rhetoric, the depth of his thought, and the ultimate shortcomings of his project. The author analyzes Smith's ideas on government, justice, human psychology, and international relations, stressing Smith's efforts to elevate wealth at the expense of citizenship and to replace normative political philosophy with historical theorizing and empirical (...)
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  44. Fernando Tohmé & Ricardo Crespo (2013). Abduction in Economics: A Conceptual Framework and its Model. Synthese 190 (18):4215-4237.score: 24.0
    We discuss in this paper the scope of abduction in Economics. The literature on this type of inference shows that it can be interpreted in different ways, according to the role and nature of its outcome. We present a formal model that allows to capture these various meanings in different economic contexts.
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  45. Francisco Louçã (1997). Turbulence in Economics: An Evolutionary Appraisal of Cycles and Complexity in Historical Processess. E. Elgar Pub..score: 24.0
    PART ONE The Evolutionary Metaphors in the Reconstruction of Economics The indiscriminate application of the term 'evolution' however, has led to some ...
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  46. Betsy Jane Clary, Wilfred Dolfsma & Deborah M. Figart (eds.) (2006). Ethics and the Market: Insights From Social Economics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Much existing economic theory overlooks ethics. Rather than situating the market and values at separate extremes of a continuum, Ethics and the Market contends that the two are necessarily and intimately related. This volume brings together some of the best work in the social economics tradition, with contributions on the social economy, social capital, identity, ethnicity and development, the household, externalities, international finance, capability, and pedagogy. Proceeding from an examination of the moral implications of markets, the book goes on (...)
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  47. Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.) (1995). Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Out of the Margin is the first book to consider feminist concerns across the whole domain of economics. In recent years there has been a tremendous increase in interest on the relation between gender and economics. Feminists have found much of concern in the way the economics has written women out of its history, built its theories around masculinist values, failed to take proper account of women and their work when measuring the economy and ignored most of (...)
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  48. Aki Petteri Lehtinen, Jaakko Kuorikoski & Petri Ylikoski (eds.) (2012). Economics for Real: Uskali Mäki and the Place of Truth in Economics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book provides the first comprehensive and critical examination of Mäki's realist philosophy of economics.
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  49. Subroto Roy (1989/1991). Philosophy of Economics: On the Scope of Reason in Economic Inquiry. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The Philosophy of Economics is the first work to seriously and successfully bridge twentieth-century economics and twentieth-century philosophy. Subroto Roy draws these two disciplines together and examines the basic intellectual roots of economics. This is also the first work by an economist to employ the writings of Wittgenstein and to tackle seriously the import of modern philosophy for economic thought. Unlike others in the field, Roy discusses not only the contributions of Popper, Kuhn, and Lakatos but also (...)
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  50. Don Lavoie (ed.) (1990). Economics and Hermeneutics. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Hermeneutics has become a major topic of debate throughout the scholarly community. What has been called the "interpretive turn" has led to interesting new approaches in both the human and social sciences, and has helped to transform divided disciplines by bringing them closer together. Yet one of the largest and most important social sciences economics has so far been almost completely left out of the transformation. Economics and Hermeneutics takes a significant step towards filling this gap by introducing (...)
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