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  1. Edwin Hartman (1996). Organizational Ethics and the Good Life. Oxford University Press.
    Edwin Hartman argues that ethical principles should not derive from abstract theory, but from the real world of experience in organizations. He explains how ethical principles derive from what workers learn in their communities (firms), and that an ethical firm is one that creates the good life for the workers who contribute to its mission. His approach is based on the Aristotelian tradition of refined common sense, from recent work on collective action problems in organizations, and from social contract theory.
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  2.  8
    Edwin M. Hartman (2011). Virtue, Profit, and the Separation Thesis: An Aristotelian View. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):5 - 17.
    If social scientists take natural science as a model, they may err in their predictions and may offer facile ethical views. Maclntyre assails them for this, but he is unduly pessimistic about business, and in rejecting the separation thesis he raises some difficulties about naturalism.Aristotle's views of the good life and of the close relationship between internal and external goods provide a corrective to Maclntyre, and in fact suggest how virtues can support social capital and thus prevail within and among (...)
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  3.  32
    Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Socratic Questions and Aristotelian Answers: A Virtue-Based Approach to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):313 - 328.
    To teach that being ethical requires knowing foundational ethical principles – or, as Socrates claimed, airtight definitions of ethical terms – is to invite cynicism among students, for students discover that no such principles can be found. Aristotle differs from Socrates in claiming that ethics is about virtues primarily, and that one can be virtuous without having the sort of knowledge that characterizes mathematics or natural science. Aristotle is able to demonstrate that ethics and self-interest may overlap, that ethics is (...)
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  4.  41
    Edwin M. Hartman (1998). The Role of Character in Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):547-559.
    There is good reason to take a virtue-based approach to business ethics. Moral principles are fairly useful in assessing actions, but understanding how moral people behave and how they become moral requires reference to virtues, some of which are important inbusiness. We must go beyond virtues and refer to character, of which virtues are components, to grasp the relationship between moralassessment and psychological explanation. Virtues and other character traits are closely related to (in technical terms, they superveneon) personality traits postulated (...)
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  5.  2
    Edwin M. Hartman (2015). Rationality in Management Theory and Practice: An Aristotelian Perspective. Philosophy of Management 14 (1):5-16.
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  6.  14
    Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Reconciliation in Business Ethics: Some Advice From Aristotle. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):253-265.
    It may be nearly impossible to use standard principles to make a decision about a complex ethical case. The best decision, say virtue ethicists in the Aristotelian tradition, is often one that is made by a person of good character who knows the salient facts of the case and can frame the situation appropriately. In this respect ethical decisions and strategic decisions are similar. Rationality plays a role in good ethical decision-making, but virtue ethicists emphasize the importance ofintuitions and emotions (...)
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  7.  73
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Prospects. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:161-162.
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  8.  9
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  9. Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona (2012). Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition: Virtue and the Common Good in Business and Management. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  10.  31
    R. Edward Freeman, Daniel R. Gilbert & Edwin Hartman (1988). Values and the Foundations of Strategic Management. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):821 - 834.
    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of values in strategic management. We discuss recent criticisms of the concept of strategy and argue that the concept of value helps reconcile these criticisms with traditional models of strategy. We show that Andrews' model of corporate strategy rightly takes morally significant values to be essential to effective management. We show how the notion of value can be clarified and used in research into various conceptions of corporate morality.
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  11.  33
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Voice. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:174-177.
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  12.  2
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics: A Response to Phillips and Margolis. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  13.  30
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Persons. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:122-124.
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  14.  15
    Edwin M. Hartman (1994). The Commons and the Moral Organization. Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):253-269.
    A complex organization is in effect a commons, which supervisory techniques cannot preserve from free riding. A corporate culture strong enough to create the requisite community-minded second-order desires and beliefs may be morally illegitimate. What morality requires is not local enforcement of foundational moral principles-a futile undertaking-but that the organization be a good community in that it permits the disaffected to exit, encourages reflective consideration of morality and the good life, and creates appropriate loyalty.
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  15.  24
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Loyalty. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:171-174.
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  16.  26
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Notes. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:86-89.
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  17.  14
    Edwin M. Hartman (2001). Character and Leadership. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (2):3-21.
  18.  21
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Commons and Being Better Off. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:78-80.
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  19.  2
    Edwin Hartman (2013). Aristotle on Character Formation. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer 67--88.
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  20.  7
    Edwin M. Hartman (2000). Socratic Ethics and the Challenge of Globalization. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):211-220.
    We have reached a rough moral consensus in the field of business ethics. We believe in capitalism with a safety net and enoughregulation to deal with serious market imperfections. We favor autonomy for individuals and democracy for governments, thoughnot necessarily for organizations. We recognize the rights of citizens and the different rights of employees. We respect a variety of possible sets of values, and so countenance a distinction between public and private. In other words, we are capitalists, pluralists, and liberals. (...)
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  21.  21
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Moral Communities and Social Contracts. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:69-74.
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  22.  4
    Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona (2012). Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  23.  17
    Ed Hartman (2007). Report From the President. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 18 (1):1-1.
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  24.  14
    Ed Hartman (2007). Report From the President. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 18 (1):1-1.
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  25.  13
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Commons Problem. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:74-78.
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  26.  15
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Against Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:91-95.
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  27.  15
    Edwin Hartman (1997). Meaning, Rules, and Bureaucracy. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:120-126.
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  28.  15
    Ed Hartman (2007). Report From the President. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 18 (1):1-1.
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  29.  14
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Contexts and Consequences. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:98-100.
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  30.  12
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Nature of Culture. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:149-151.
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  31.  4
    Laura P. Hartman & Edwin M. Hartman (2004). How to Teach Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):165-212.
    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has called for stronger ethics programs. There are two problems with this battle cry. First, the AACSB rejects, with weak arguments, the single best way to get ethics into the curriculum. Second, the AACSB can only vaguely describe some unpromising alternatives to that strategy. A number of leading business ethicists have challenged the AACSB to defend and clarify its views, to little avail. The proposed Procedures and Standards cannot by themselves bring about (...)
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  32.  6
    Edwin Hartman (1977). Substance, Body and Soul: Aristotelian Investigations. Princeton University Press.
  33.  20
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Relativism. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:18-20.
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  34. Edwin M. Hartman (1992). Conceptual Foundations of Organization Theory. Philosophical Review 101 (2):484-485.
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  35.  13
    Ed Hartman (2007). Report From the President. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 18 (1):1-1.
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  36.  11
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Morality and Communities. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:68-69.
  37.  1
    Edwin M. Hartman (2008). Socratic Questions and Aristotelian Answers: A Virtue-Based Approach to Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):313-328.
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  38.  37
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Versions of Happiness. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:35-38.
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  39.  10
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Morality and Autonomy. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:121-122.
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  40.  10
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Principles for Good Organizations. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:107-110.
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  41.  20
    Edwin M. Hartman (2000). An Aristotelian Approach to Moral Imagination. Professional Ethics 8 (3/4):57-77.
  42.  10
    Bruce Buchanan & Edwin Hartman (2007). Teaching Ethics to Business Professors. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:521-523.
    The Stern School is undertaking a program to teach business ethics to Stern professors and others who have an interest in ethics but no previous formal instruction. The two-year series of faculty seminars will produce a cadre of professors who are well equipped to do research, to write scholarly papers, and to teach business ethics at a high level. The documentation of the seminar series will be available for others to use.
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  43.  9
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Utility and Discrimination. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:49-51.
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  44.  9
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Principles of Morality. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:101-103.
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  45.  16
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Rational as Social. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:144-146.
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  46.  32
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Emotion. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:135-137.
  47.  8
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Utilitarianism and Its Difficulties. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:34-35.
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  48.  8
    Edwin Hartman (1996). The Good Community and the Good Organization. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:166-168.
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  49.  13
    Edwin Hartman (1996). Culture, Roles, Self. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:160-161.
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  50.  25
    Edwin M. Hartman (1996). Authority and Democracy. Philosophical Review 105 (2):272-274.
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