Search results for 'Edith Sizoo' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edith Sizoo (ed.) (2010). Responsibility and Cultures of the World: Dialogue Around a Collective Challenge. P.I.E. Peter Lang.score: 240.0
    "I do not want my house to be walled in on all sides and my windows to be stuffed. I want the cultures of all the lands to be blown about my house as freely ...
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  2. Mary Edith (1951). Jeanne d'Arc (Review). Franciscan Studies 11 (1):104-107.score: 30.0
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  3. O. P. Edith (1951). Jeanne d'Arc (Review). Franciscan Studies 11 (1):104-107.score: 30.0
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  4. Kris McDaniel (forthcoming). Edith Stein: On the Problem of Empathy. In Eric Schliesser (ed.), Ten Neglected Philosophical Classics. Oxford.score: 21.0
    I will discuss Stein’s first major philosophical work, On the Problem of Empathy. I’ll first present some of the background context to the composition of this work and then discuss some of the themes of the work that I find intriguing.
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  5. Sylvia M. Maatta (2006). Closeness and Distance in the Nurse-Patient Relation. The Relevance of Edith Stein's Concept of Empathy. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):3-10.score: 21.0
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  6. Antonio Calcagno (2008). Being, Aevum , and Nothingness: Edith Stein on Death and Dying. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):59-72.score: 18.0
    This article seeks to present for the first time a more systematic account of Edith Stein’s views on death and dying. First, I will argue that death does not necessarily lead us to an understanding of our earthly existence as aevum, that is, an experience of time between eternity and finite temporality. We always bear the mark of our finitude, including our finite temporality, even when we exist within the eternal mind of God. To claim otherwise, is to make (...)
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  7. Dermot Moran (2008). Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.score: 18.0
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein (who attempted to fuse phenomenology with Neo-Thomism), and also consider the (...)
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  8. Jane Duran (2011). Teresian Influence on the Work of Edith Stein. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (3):242 - 254.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein is honored today not only because of her sainthood but because of what is now seen as important and groundbreaking work in phenomenology done under especially arduous conditions. Thus it may be said with some accuracy that Stein is, among philosophers, in the comparatively rare category of being acknowledged both for her work and her exemplary life. Writing on Stein has standardly proceeded with an emphasis on the biographical factors that caused her to live and write as (...)
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  9. Walter Redmond (2008). A Nothing That Is: Edith Stein on Being Without Essence. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):71-86.score: 18.0
    St. Thomas Aquinas has been considered a kairos in intellectual history for seeing God’s essence as being. Martin Heidegger criticized philosophers forrepresenting being as a be-ing and identifying it with God, and Jean-Luc Marion speaks of “God without being.” In her Potency and Act Edith Stein introduced thecategory of being without essence, but such being is not God but “the opposite.” For St. Augustine sin was an approach to nonbeing, and Stein saw it leading to a“displacement into nonbeing,” to (...)
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  10. Angela Ales Bello (2008). Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):143-159.score: 18.0
    The goal of this article is to analyze the way in which Edith Stein describes the human subject throughout her research, including her phenomenological phaseand the period of her Christian philosophy. In order to do this, I trace essential moments in Husserl’s philosophy, showing both Stein’s reliance upon Husserl andher originality. Both thinkers believe that an analysis of the human being can be carried out by examining consciousness and its lived experiences. Through suchan examination Stein arrives at the same (...)
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  11. Karl Schudt (2008). Edith Stein's Proof for the Existence of God From Consciousness. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):105-125.score: 18.0
    I examine Edith Stein’s argument for the existence of God found in Finite and Eternal Being. Although largely Thomistic in its structure, the proof is unique in its details, starting with the life of the ego (Ichleben) and ascending to the being of God. The ego is shown to be contingent in its being as well as in the meaning-content through which it lives. Stein argues that this dependent being cannot be accounted for without a being that does not (...)
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  12. Antonio Calcagno (2006). Assistant and/or Collaborator? Edith Stein's Relationship to Edmund Husserl's Ideen II. In Joyce Avrech Berkman (ed.), Contemplating Edith Stein: A Collection of Essays, pp. 243–270. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 18.0
  13. Fernando Infante Del Rosal (2013). Fiction in Edith Stein's Idea of Empathy. Ideas Y Valores 62 (153):137-155.score: 18.0
    RESUMEN En su primera investigación, Edith Stein se propuso definir la esencia de la Einfühlung (empatía) como experiencia de la conciencia ajena; pretendía así fundamentar que, como había indicado Husserl, ese acto abría la posibilidad de una intersubjetividad trascendental como solución al solipsismo de la conciencia. Stein halló la clave de esa esencia en la idea de originariedad, pero intentó evitar el problema de la empatía estética, sirviéndose de Los ídolos del autoconocimiento de Scheler. ABSTRACT In her first research (...)
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  14. Victor M. Salas (2011). Edith Stein and Medieval Metaphysics. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2):323 - 340.score: 18.0
    This essay considers Edith Stein’s account of “essential being” and finds therein a point of continuity with medieval metaphysics. Scholarly attention has already been given to this feature of Stein’s metaphysics; it has been argued that “essential being,” while serving as a crucial point of distinction between Stein andThomas Aquinas’s own metaphysics, functions as a point of similarity between Stein and Duns Scotus. However, I argue that, while there are certainly manypoints of congruence between Stein and Scotus on the (...)
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  15. Mary Catharine Baseheart (1989). Edith Stein's Philosophy of Woman and of Women's Education. Hypatia 4 (1):120 - 131.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein, Husserl's brilliant student and assistant, devoted ten years of her life to teaching in a girls' secondary school, during which time she gave a series of lectures on educational reform and the appropriate education to be provided to girls. She grounds her answer to these questions in a philosophical account of the nature of woman. She argues that men and women share some universally human characteristics, but that they have separate and distinct natures. Her awareness of the (...)
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  16. Sarah Borden (2006). Edith Stein's Understanding of Woman. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):171-190.score: 18.0
    This essay looks at Edith Stein’s descriptions of the fundamental equality, yet distinct differences between women and men, and attempts to make clear the ontology underlying her claims. Stein’s position—although drawing from the general Aristotelian-Thomistic position—differs from Thomas Aquinas’s, and she understands gender as tied significantly to our form or soul. The particular way in which gender is “written into” our soul, however, differs from the way in which both our humanity and individuality are tied to our soul. Thus, (...)
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  17. Antonio Calcagno (2011). Edith Stein's Philosophy of Community in Her Early Work and in Her Later Finite and Eternal Being. Philosophy and Theology 23 (2):231-255.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein’s early phenomenological texts describe community as a special unity that is fully lived through in consciousness. In her later works, unity is described in more theological terms as participation in the communal fullness and wholeness of God or Being. Can these two accounts of community or human belonging be reconciled? I argue that consciousness can bring to the fore the meaning of community, thereby conditioning our lived-experience of community, but it can also, through Heideggerian questioning, uncover that (...)
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  18. Hanna-Barbara Gerl-Falkovitz (2009). Edith Stein's Little-Known Side. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):555-581.score: 18.0
    This paper examines Edith Stein’s phenomenological analysis of society—a neglected side of her thought—and situates it in a two-fold context: (a) philosophical studies of society undertaken in German-speaking lands in the aftermath of the First World War, and (b) Christian concepts of surrogacy and responsibility for the other.
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  19. Reichmann (2013). Edith Stein, Thomas Aquinas, and the Principle of Individuation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):55-86.score: 18.0
    This paper focuses on the major work of Edith Stein, Finite and Eternal Being. It seeks to determine whether her mature philosophical synthesis is correctly viewed as Thomist. It strives to accomplish this by focusing mainly on her treatment of the problem of individuation.
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  20. Angela Ales Bello & Antonio Calcagno (2012). What Is Life? The Contributions of Hedwig Conrad-Martius and Edith Stein. Symposium 16 (2):20-33.score: 18.0
    The phenomenological movement originates with Edmund Husserl, and two of his young students and collaborators, Edith Stein and Hedwig Conrad-Martius, made a notable contribution to the very delineation of the phenomenological method, which pushed phenomenology in a “realistic” direction. This essay seeks to examine the decisive influence that these two thinkers had on two specific areas: the value of the sciences and certain metaphysical questions. Concerningthe former, I maintain that Stein, departing from a philosophical, phenomenological analysis of the human (...)
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  21. Angela Ales Bello (2007). The Study of the Soul Between Psychology and Phenomenology at Edith Stein. Cultura 4 (2):90-108.score: 18.0
    In the study of the soul between psychology and phenomenology in Edith Stein works it becomes clearer that it is only phenomenology that really comes to gripswith the question of psychic causality by correlating the two moments and it is therefore only phenomenology that can respond to Hume’s objections while yetremaining on his selfsame terrain. It is very important to distinguish between psychology and phenomenology and also to clarify the relationship between psyche and consciousness; there is thus reproposed the (...)
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  22. Hans Rainer Sepp (1998). La Postura de Edith Stein Dentro Del Movimiento Fenomenológico. Anuario Filosófico 31 (62):709-730.score: 18.0
    This article describes the place occupied by Edith Stein's philosophy in the early phenomenological movement, in relation to the most important philosophers of this philosophy: Edmund Husserl, Max Scheler, and Martin Heidegger.
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  23. Joyce Avrech Berkman (2008). Edith Stein: A Life Unveiled and Veiled. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):5-29.score: 18.0
    Drawing on diverse first-person documents, philosophical writings, and historical scholarship, this bio-historical introduction to Edith Stein examines her crucial life choices and philosophical creativity within the framework of her formative personal and historical circumstances. Drawn deeply to unravel the mysteries of life that she prized as a fertile hidden darkness, Stein deliberately disclosed and concealed her inner tumult and reflections. This essay argues that the axis of herlife was her agonizing struggle—rife with ambiguity, confusion, contradiction, and luminous clarity—to redefine (...)
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  24. Jose Luis Caballero Bono (2012). Edith Stein and Heidegger's «Being and Time»: A White Hermeneutics. Veritas 27 (27):97-112.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein leyó la obra de Martin Heidegger Ser y tiempo en 1927, el mismo año de su publicación. Este artículo trata de reconstruir la «hermenéutica blanca» de esa lectura, es decir, las reacciones que pudo suscitar y que no fueron puestas por escrito en ese momento. Se toman como guía tres comentarios azarosos de la autora en relación tanto a Ser y tiempo como a la filosofía de Heidegger en general. Edith Stein read Martin Heidegger’s Being and (...)
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  25. Ari M. Solon (2001). State, Law and Religion in Edith Stein's Thought. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 14 (2):215-221.score: 18.0
    This article presents a paradox in the thought of Edith Stein betweenher attitudes in relation to the state/law problem and her vision ofreligion. I seek to explain the paradox through the study of the Theoryof the State and Sovereignty. In this regard, basing herself onclassical authors, Edith Stein disagrees with the great jurists of hertime who did not always recognise the priority of the concept ofsovereignty. The examination of the relationship between the State andlaw breaks new ground within (...)
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  26. Calogero Caltagirone (2013). "Dar-forma" all'umano: dimensione antropologica, etica ed educativa della bildung in Edith Stein // "Shaping" the human: anthropological, ethical and educational bildung in Edith Stein. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 18 (3):15-23.score: 18.0
    Il presente lavoro intende cogliere l’originalità e la fecondità della prospettiva di Edith Stein sul fondamento antropologico ed etico dell’educativo. Mediante l’analisi del radicamento antropologico della dimensione formativa, che si fonda sulla la struttura antropologica della persona umana, si pone l’obiettivo di offrire i fondamenti antropologici ed etici alla relazione educativa, concentrandosi sul senso dell’educazione intesa come formazione ( Bildung ) integrale dell’uomo.
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  27. Hanna-Barbara Gerl-Falkovitz (1998). La Cuestión de la Mujer Según Edith Stein. Anuario Filosófico 31 (62):753-784.score: 18.0
    This article presents Edith Stein's vision of womanhood, from the point of view of theology, pedagogy, and psychology. Edith Stein means to offer the most complete vision possible on the question of womanhood, one that will be faithful to the scope of its dimensions: social, political, anthropological, philosophical, ecclesiastic, canonical, and even theological.
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  28. Timothy Martell (2012). Edith Stein's Political Ontology. Symposium 16 (2):201-217.score: 18.0
    What is a society? What is political power? John Searle claims that previous political philosophers not only neglected these fundamental questions but also lacked the means to effectively address them. Good answers, he thinks, depend on theories of speech acts, intentionality, and constitutive rules first developed by analytic philosophers. But Searle is mistaken. Early phenomenologists had already developed the requisite theories. Reinach’s philosophy of law includes a theory of speech acts. This theory is based on Husserl’s account of intentionality. (...) Stein extended that account by offering a detailed description of collective intentionality. And it was Stein who brought these strands of early phenomenological research together to address the very questions of political philosophy Searle regards as both fundamental and neglected. In this paper, I recount Stein’s answers to these questions and argue that they compare favourably withthose of Searle. (shrink)
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  29. Fernando Haya (1998). El Marco Fenomenológico y El Realismo Metafísico En El Pensamiento de Edith Stein. Anuario Filosófico 31 (62):819-842.score: 18.0
    This paper analyses Edith Stein's thought in order to find out, particularly in the investigation the philosopher did about Thomas Aquinas, the metaphysical assumptions hidden in the phenomeno-logy. It tries to clarify in which way the steinian "realism of essence", based on a certain logical atomism, gives up the idealistic postulates of Husserl's philosophy.
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  30. Alasdair MacIntyre (2005). Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue, 1913-1922. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 18.0
    Written with a clarity that reaches beyond an academic audience, this book will reward careful study by anyone interested in Edith Stein as thinker, pioneer and saint.
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  31. Francisco J. Sancho (1998). Filosofía y Vida: El Itinerario Filosófico de Edith Stein. Anuario Filosófico 31 (62):665-688.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein (1891-1942) is a clear example of a philosopher, since she dedicated her entire life and effort to the conquest of Truth, of Being. The path she follows begins with her personal experience and her desire to find an answer to the existence of man. In phenomenology, she will find a means of confronting reality, free of prejudices. During her intellectual and existential journey, she meets a God that becomes living experience and quenches her thirst for Truth. She (...)
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  32. Philibert Secretan (1999). Edith Stein y la mística española. Diálogo Filosófico 45:421-432.score: 18.0
    Una de las cuestiones que se plantean con insistencia a todos aquellos que están interesados en la obra de Edith Stein, en religión Sor Teresa Benedicta a Cruce, es la de saber si hay ruptura o continuidad entre la filósofa y la religiosa, entre la obra fenomenológica y los comentarios místicos. Yo me inclino por la tesis de la continuidad, aunque dispongamos de documentos autobiográficos que parecen indicar lo contrario, y es en parte a la demostración de esta tesis (...)
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  33. Edith Stein (2002). Partv Edith Stein. In Dermot Moran & Timothy Mooney (eds.), The Phenomenology Reader. Routledge. 227.score: 18.0
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  34. Edith Wyschogrod, Eric Boynton & Martin Kavka (eds.) (2009). Saintly Influence: Edith Wyschogrod and the Possibilities of Philosophy of Religion. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    In all of these discourses, she has sought to cultivate an awareness of how the self is situated and influenced, as well as the ways in which a self can influence others.In this volume, twelve scholars examine and display the influence of ...
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  35. Ann W. Astell (2005). Biblical Images of God and the Reader's “I” as Imago Dei The Contribution of Edith Stein. Interpretation 59 (4):382-391.score: 18.0
    Amidst Nazi persecution, Edith Stein discovered in the biblical images of God a mystical path of identity formation leading to a transformative union with Christ.
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  36. Angela Ales Bello (2008). Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein: The Question of the Human Subject. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):143-159.score: 18.0
    The goal of this article is to analyze the way in which Edith Stein describes the human subject throughout her research, including her phenomenological phaseand the period of her Christian philosophy. In order to do this, I trace essential moments in Husserl’s philosophy, showing both Stein’s reliance upon Husserl andher originality. Both thinkers believe that an analysis of the human being can be carried out by examining consciousness and its lived experiences. Through suchan examination Stein arrives at the same (...)
     
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  37. Edith Brugmans (2009). Dusing, Edith und Klein, H.-D.(Hrsg.), Geist und Literatur. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 71 (2):429.score: 18.0
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  38. Rebecca Garden (2010). Sympathy, Disability, and the Nurse: Female Power in Edith Wharton's The Fruit of the Tree. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (3):223-242.score: 18.0
    The nursing profession’s emphasis on empathy as essential to nursing care may undermine nurses’ power as a collective and detract from perceptions of nurses’ analytical skills and expertise. The practice of empathy may also obscure and even compound patients’ suffering when it does not fully account for their subjectivity. This essay examines the relation of empathy to women’s agency and explores the role empathy plays in obscuring rather than empowering the suffering other, particularly people who are disabled, through a close (...)
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  39. Karl-Heinz Lembeck (1998). De la Crítica a la Mística: Edith Stein y le Neokantianismo de Marburgo. Anuario Filosófico 31 (62):689-708.score: 18.0
    The chronological proximity of the Marburg neo-Kantian school and Edith Stein's phenomenological philosophy, and - related to this - the existence of common philosophical problems allow us to approach the question of the relationship between Edith Stein and the Marburg neo-Kantian school not looking for similarities, but rather comparing the points of view of Edith Stein and Paul Natorp (the author chosen to represent this School) on the same problems.
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  40. PeterJ Schulz (2008). Toward the Subjectivity of the Human Person: Edith Stein's Contribution to the Theory of Identity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):161-176.score: 18.0
    Edith Stein’s work revolves around one central question, namely, the identity of the person. Discussions of this topic are already present in Stein’s dissertation. Iexamine her theory of identity, developed throughout her work and maturing in her magnum opus, Finite and Eternal Being, in three stages, each of which is historically relevant and original. First, Stein’s development of the question is examined phenomenologically, focusing on Stein’s early work. Second, I will show how Stein takes her early phenomenological positions concerning (...)
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  41. Edith Stein (2010). Der Brief der Hl. Edith Stein: Von der Phänomenologie Zur Hermeneutik. Pais-Verlag.score: 18.0
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  42. Edith Stein (1986). The Collected Works of Edith Stein, Sister Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Discalced Carmelite. Ics Publications.score: 18.0
     
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  43. Frank Arntzenius (2008). No Regrets, Or: Edith Piaf Revamps Decision Theory. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 68 (2):277-297.score: 15.0
    I argue that standard decision theories, namely causal decision theory and evidential decision theory, both are unsatisfactory. I devise a new decision theory, from which, under certain conditions, standard game theory can be derived.
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  44. Roman Ingarden (1962). Edith Stein on Her Activity as an Assistant of Edmund Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (2):155-175.score: 15.0
  45. Bruce W. Ballard (2007). The Difference for Philosophy: Edith Stein and Martin Heidegger. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):95-105.score: 15.0
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  46. John Haldane (2009). Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue by Alasdair Macintyre. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):610-614.score: 15.0
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  47. Larry May (1992). Book Review:Saints and Postmodernism: Revisioning Moral Philosophy. Edith Wyschogrod. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (1):181-.score: 15.0
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  48. Beate Beckmann-Zöller (2008). Edith Stein's Theory of the Person in Her Münster Years (1932–1933). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):47-70.score: 15.0
    The new critical edition of Stein’s lectures on philosophical and theological anthropology makes it possible to research further her theory of the person as developed during her middle period in Munster, that is, between 1932 and 1933. Her project revolves around the anthropological foundations of a Catholicpedagogy. Th is phase of her work is marked by various debates. On one hand, she attempts to bring the intellectual legacy of Husserl and phenomenology intodialogue with Thomas Aquinas and other Scholastic thinkers. On (...)
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  49. Dermot Moran (2010). Review of Sarah Borden Sharkey, Thine Own Self: Individuality in Edith Stein's Later Writings. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).score: 15.0
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  50. Jane Duran (2007). Edith Stein, Ontology and Belief. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):707–712.score: 15.0
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