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  1. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1993). The Virtues in Medical Practice. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years, virtue theories have enjoyed a renaissance of interest among general and medical ethicists. This book offers a virtue-based ethic for medicine, the health professions, and health care. Beginning with a historical account of the concept of virtue, the authors construct a theory of the place of the virtues in medical practice. Their theory is grounded in the nature and ends of medicine as a special kind of human activity. The concepts of virtue, the virtues, and the virtuous (...)
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  2. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
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  3. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice: Toward a Philosophy and Ethic of the Healing Professions. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Internal Morality of Clinical Medicine: A Paradigm for the Ethics of the Helping and Healing Professions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):559 – 579.
    The moral authority for professional ethics in medicine customarily rests in some source external to medicine, i.e., a pre-existing philosophical system of ethics or some form of social construction, like consensus or dialogue. Rather, internal morality is grounded in the phenomena of medicine, i.e., in the nature of the clinical encounter between physician and patient. From this, a philosophy of medicine is derived which gives moral force to the duties, virtues and obligations of physicians qua physicians. Similarly, an ethic specific (...)
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  5.  87
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2006). Toward a Reconstruction of Medical Morality. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):65 - 71.
    At the center of medical morality is the healing relationship. It is defined by three phenomena: the fact of illness, the act of profession, and the act of medicine. The first puts the patient in a vulnerable and dependent position; it results in an unequal relationship. The second implies a promise to help. The third involves those actions that will lead to a medically competent healing decision. But it must also be good for the patient in the fullest possible sense. (...)
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  6. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2005). Some Things Ought Never Be Done: Moral Absolutes in Clinical Ethics. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):469-486.
    Moral absolutes have little or no moral standing in our morally diverse modern society. Moral relativism is far more palatable for most ethicists and to the public at large. Yet, when pressed, every moral relativist will finally admit that there are some things which ought never be done. It is the rarest of moral relativists that will take rape, murder, theft, child sacrifice as morally neutral choices. In general ethics, the list of those things that must never be done will (...)
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  7.  26
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1995). Toward a Virtue-Based Normative Ethics for the Health Professions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):253-277.
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  8. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). Philosophy of Medicine: Should It Be Teleologically or Socially Constructed? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):169-180.
  9. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1999). The Commodification of Medical and Health Care: The Moral Consequences of a Paradigm Shift From a Professional to a Market Ethic. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (3):243 – 266.
    Commodification of health care is a central tenet of managed care as it functions in the United States. As a result, price, cost, quality, availability, and distribution of health care are increasingly left to the workings of the competitive marketplace. This essay examines the conceptual, ethical, and practical implications of commodification, particularly as it affects the healing relationship between health professionals and their patients. It concludes that health care is not a commodity, that treating it as such is deleterious to (...)
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  10. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Rebuttals of Rebuttals the Moral Prohibition Remains. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):93 – 100.
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  11.  99
    Robert D. Orr, Norman Pang, Edmund D. Pellegrino & Mark Siegler (1997). Use of the Hippocratic Oath: A Review of Twentieth Century Practice and a Content Analysis of Oaths Administered in Medical Schools in the US and Canada in 1993. [REVIEW] Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (4):377.
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  12.  68
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1979). Toward a Reconstruction of Medical Morality: The Primacy of the Act of Profession and the Fact of Illness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):32-56.
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  13.  72
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2006). Bioethics and Politics: "Doing Ethics" in the Public Square. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):569 – 584.
    “Hence it is necessary for a Prince wishing to hold his own to know how to do wrong and to make use of it according to necessity.”—Machiavelli“Every state is a community of some kind and every community is established with a view to some good…”—Aristotle.
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  14. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2008). The Philosophy of Medicine Reborn: A Pellegrino Reader. University of Notre Dame Press.
    What the philosophy of medicine is -- Philosophy of medicine: should it be teleologically or socially construed? -- The internal morality of clinical medicine: a paradigm for the ethics of the helping and healing professions -- Humanistic basis of professional ethics -- The commodification of medical and health care: the moral consequences of a paradigm shift from a professional to a market ethic -- Medicine today: its identity, its role, and the role of physicians -- From medical ethics to a (...)
     
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  15.  70
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2000). Bioethics at Century's Turn: Can Normative Ethics Be Retrieved? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):655 – 675.
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  16. Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1996). The Christian Virtues in Medical Practice. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  17.  46
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1992). Doctors Must Not Kill. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (2):95.
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  18.  58
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1998). What the Philosophy of Medicine Is. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (4):315-336.
  19. Edmund D. Pellegrino, Thomas W. Merrill & Adam Schulman (eds.) (2009). Human Dignity and Bioethics. University of Notre Dame Press.
    This collection of essays, commissioned by the President’s Council on Bioethics, explores a fundamental concept crucial to today’s discourse in law and ethics in general and in bioethics in particular. Since its formation in 2001, the council has frequently used the term “human dignity” in its discussions and reports. In this volume scholars from the fields of philosophy, medicine and medical ethics, law, political science, and public policy address the issue of what the concept of “human dignity” entails and its (...)
     
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  20.  13
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1992). Intersections of Western Biomedical Ethics and World Culture: Problematic and Possibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (3):191.
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  21.  75
    David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):5-11.
    The article offers an approach to inquiry about, the foundation of medical ethics by addressing three areas of conceptual presupposition basic to medical ethical theory. First, medical ethics must presuppose a view about the nature of medicine. it is argued that the view required by a cogent medical morality entails that medicine be seen both as a healing relationship and as a practical art. Three ways in which medicine inherently involves values and valuation are presented as important, i.e., in being (...)
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  22.  36
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1999). The Origins and Evolution of Bioethics: Some Personal Reflections. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (1):73-88.
  23.  30
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1995). The Limitation of Empirical Research in Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):161.
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  24.  71
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1982). The Ethics of Collective Judgments in Medicine and Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):3-10.
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  25. Edmund D. Pellegrino, David C. Thomasma & David G. Miller (1997). Helping and Healing Religious Commitment in Health Care. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  26.  75
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2002). Medical Evidence and Virtue Ethics: A Commentary on Zarkovich and Upshur. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):397-402.
  27.  19
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2000). Commentary: Value Neutrality, Moral Integrity, and the Physician. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):78-80.
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  28. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2008). The Lived Experience of Human Dignity. In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics
     
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  29.  21
    Mark Siegler, Edmund D. Pellegrino & Peter A. Singer (1990). Clinical Medical Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (1):5.
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  30.  28
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1986). Philosophy of Medicine: Towards a Definition. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (1):9-16.
  31.  20
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1976). Philosophy of Medicine: Problematic and Potential. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (1):5-31.
    SummaryThe congruence between medicine and philosophy which we find in the Protagoras and the Treatise on Ancient Medicine as well as the tensions symbolized in the dialectic between Eryximachus and Diotima will always be with us. The congruence and the divergence of these ancient disciplines are both important to human well-being. By opposing one another, medicine and philosophy can each balance the other's pretension to universality. By converging, they illumine some of the most important questions of human existence. This essay (...)
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  32.  17
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1997). Managed Care at the Bedside: How Do We Look in the Moral Mirror? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):321-330.
    : Managed care per se is a morally neutral concept; however, as practiced today, it raises serious ethical issues at the clinical, managerial, and social levels. This essay focuses on the ethical issues that arise at the bedside, looking first at the ethical conflicts faced by the physician who is charged with responsibility for care of the patient and then turning to the way in which managed care exacts costs that are measured not in dollars but in compromises in the (...)
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  33.  18
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2012). Medical Ethics in an Era of Bioethics: Resetting the Medical Profession's Compass. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):21-24.
    What it means to be a medical professional has been defined by medical ethicists throughout history and remains a contemporary concern addressed by this paper. A medical professional is generally considered to be one who makes a public promise to fulfill the ethical obligations expressed in the Hippocratic Code. This presentation summarizes the history of medical professionalism and refocuses attention on the interpersonal relationship of doctor and patient. This keynote address was delivered at the Founders of Bioethics International Congress (June, (...)
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  34.  49
    Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played in defining thefield, training (...)
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  35.  47
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2002). Obituary. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):1-3.
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  36.  38
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1980). The Physician-Patient Relationship in Preventive Medicine: Reply to Robert Dickman. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):208-212.
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  37. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2007). Professing Medicine, Virtue Based Ethics, and the Retrieval of Professionalism. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press 113--134.
     
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  38.  32
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1992). Beneficence, Scientific Autonomy, and Self-Interest: Ethical Dilemmas in Clinical Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):361.
    The ethics of clinical research may be viewed from three different perspectives: the process of acquiring new knowledge, the moral use of the knowledge acquired, and the ethics of the investigator seeking this knowledge.
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  39.  40
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2000). Carl E. Schneider, the Practice of Autonomy: Patients, Doctors, and Medical Decisions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):361-365.
  40.  5
    Edmund D. Pellegrino, M. Siegler & P. A. Singer (1990). Teaching Clinical Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (3):175.
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  41.  1
    Edmund D. Pellegrino, Mark Siegler & Peter A. Singer (1991). Future Directions in Clinical Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (1):5.
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  42.  2
    Peter A. Singer, Edmund D. Pellegrino & Mark Siegler (1990). Ethics Committees and Consultants. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):263.
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  43. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1995). Interests, Obligations, and Justice: Some Notes Toward an Ethic of Managed Care. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (4):312.
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  44. David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics. Metamedicine 2 (1):5-11.
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  45.  34
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1984). The Humanities in Medical Education: Entering the Post-Evangelical Era. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (3):253-266.
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  46.  31
    Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1981). Toward an Axiology for Medicine a Response to Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (3):331-342.
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  47.  29
    Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1987). Medicine as a Science of Action a Response to Peter Hucklenbroich. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):235-243.
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  48.  9
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1994). Healthcare: Reform, Yes; But Not À la Lamm. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):168.
    Richard Lamm is an eloquent and insistent advocate for healthcare reform. In his paper, he argues that if reform is to be effective, a radical metamorphosis in the values underlying our present system must take place. “New realities” have made the “old values” unsustainable. Unless they are replaced by “new values,” we face a future of disastrous overspending, gross inequities in accessibility, poorer health for many, and more expensive dying.
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  49.  25
    David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1987). Challenges for a Philosophy of Medicine of the Future: A Response to Fellow Philosophers in the Netherlands. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):187-204.
  50.  27
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2005). Homage to David Thomasma: Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):437-439.
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