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  1. Mary T. Clark, Aaron Conley, María Teresa Dávila, Mark Doorley, Todd French, J. Burton Fulmer, Jennifer Herdt, Rodolfo Hernandez-Diaz, John Kiess, Matthew J. Pereira, Siobhan Nash-Marshall, Edmund N. Santurri, George Schmidt, Sarah Stewart-Kroeker, Sergey Trostyanskiy, Darlene Weaver & William Werpehowski (2015). Augustine and Social Justice. Lexington Books.
    This volume examines some of the most contentious social justice issues present in the corpus of Augustine's writings. Whether one is concerned with human trafficking and the contemporary slave trade, the global economy, or endless wars, these essays further the conversation on social justice as informed by the writings of Augustine of Hippo.
     
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  2. Mark A. Wilson, Julie Hanlon Rubio, Lisa Tessman, Mary M. Doyle Roche, James F. Keenan, Margaret Urban Walker, Jamie Schillinger, Jean Porter, Jennifer A. Herdt & Edmund N. Santurri (2014). Virtue and the Moral Life: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives. Lexington Books.
     
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  3. Mark A. Wilson, Julie Hanlon Rubio, Lisa Tessman, Mary M. Doyle Roche, S. J. Keenan, Margaret Urban Walker, Jamie Schillinger, Jean Porter, Jennifer A. Herdt & Edmund N. Santurri (2014). Virtue and the Moral Life: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    Virtue and the Moral Life brings together distinguished philosophers and theologians with younger scholars of consummate promise to produce ten essays that engage both academics and students of ethics. This collection explores the role virtues play in identifying the good life and the good society.
     
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  4. Edmund N. Santurri (2013). The Neo‐Barthian Critique of Reinhold Niebuhr. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (3):541-547.
    The author notes an unclarity in David Novak's defense of Reinhold Niebuhr against Stanley Hauerwas's critique and identifies some issues left unsettled in the exchange between Novak and Hauerwas over Niebuhr's ethics. Specifically, the author proposes that the Barthian-Hauerwasian communitarian rejection of Niebuhrian natural theology and natural law ignores the historical abuse of biblical theology in the German Christian response to the Nazis, fails to account for the fact of general moral revulsion against Nazism, and flirts itself with a conventionalist (...)
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  5. Edmund N. Santurri (2005). Global Justice After the Fall Christian Realism and the “Law of Peoples”. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):783-814.
    In "The Law of Peoples" John Rawls casts his proposals as an argument against what he calls "political realism." Here, I contend that a certain version of "Christian political realism" survives Rawls's polemic against political realism sans phrase and that Rawls overstates his case against political realism writ large. Specifically, I argue that Rawls's dismissal of "empirical political realism" is underdetermined by the evidence he marshals in support of the dismissal and that his rejection of "normative political realism" is in (...)
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  6. Edmund N. Santurri (1991). Response to Langan's “Egoism and Morality in the Theological Teleology of Thomas Aquinas”. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:427-430.
  7. Edmund N. Santurri (1987). Perplexity in the Moral Life: Philosophical and Theological Considerations. University Press of Virginia.
    In Perplexity in the Moral Life Santurri discusses how situations of moral perplexity are to be construed and how the interpretation of these situations might be constrained by the presuppositions of Christian ethics.
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  8. Edmund N. Santurri & William Werpehowski (1982). Substituted Judgment and the Terminally-Ill Incompetent. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 57 (4):484-501.