Search results for 'Education, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dorothy L. Sayers (1948). The Lost Tools of Learning: Paper Read at a Vacation Course in Education, Oxford, 1947. Methuen.score: 78.0
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  2. Shafique Ali Khan (1976). Ghazali's Philosophy of Education: An Exposition of Ghazali's Ideas, Concepts, Theories and Philosophy of Education. Agents, Readers Associates.score: 78.0
     
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  3. Lon R. Shelby (1970). The Education of Medieval Master Masons. Mediaeval Studies 32 (1):1-26.score: 76.0
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  4. G. R. Evans (2006). Medieval Education. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):377-378.score: 72.0
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  5. Avner Giladi (2005). Individualism and Conformity in Medieval Islamic Educational Thought: Some Notes with Special Reference to Elementary Education. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 26 (1):99-122.score: 72.0
    En las sociedades islámicas medievales, las convenciones culturales y las normas sociales tenían un papel importante en la educación, pero los pensadores musulmanes también prestaron atención a las diferencias individuales entre los estudiantes y a la necesidad de ajustar tanto el contenido de la enseñanza como los métodos educativos al contexto familiar de esos estudiantes, así como a sus habilidades personales, sus inclinaciones y sus aspiraciones. Esto pudo deberse no sólo a la herencia de los "árabes preislámicos y del Islam (...)
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  6. Steven P. Marrone (1996). Astrik L. Gabriel, The Paris Studium: Robert of Sorbonne and His Legacy. Interuniversity Exchange Between the German, Cracow and Louvain Universities and That of Paris in the Late Medieval and Humanistic Period. Selected Studies. Preface by James J. John.(Texts and Studies in the History of Mediaeval Education, 19.) Frankfurt Am Main: Josef Knecht, 1992. Pp. 541; 32 Black-and-White Plates. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):425-426.score: 72.0
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  7. Robert Bartlett (2002). HR Loyn, The English Church, 940–1154.(The Medieval World.) Harlow, Eng.: Pearson Education, 2000. Pp. X, 174. Speculum 77 (2):588-589.score: 72.0
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  8. James A. Brundage (2009). David L. Sheffler, Schools and Schooling in Late Medieval Germany: Regensburg, 1250–1500. (Education and Society in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, 33.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. Pp. Xv, 417; Tables and 6 Maps. €119. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (3):771-773.score: 72.0
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  9. Peter Byrne (1993). C. Schwöbel and C. Gunton. Eds. Persons, Divine and Human. Pp. 165. (Edinburgh: T. And T. Clark, 1992.) £16.95.R. M. Hare. Essays on Religion and Education. Pp. 238. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.) £27.50B. B. Price. Medieval Thought: An Introduction. Pp. 261. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1992.) £40 Hdbk, £11.95 Pbk.H. Margenau and R. A. Varghese, Eds. Cosmos, Bios, Theos: Scientists Reflect on Science, God and the Origins of the Universe, Life and Homo Sapiens. Pp. 285. (La Salle: Open Court, 1992.) $38.95 Hdbk, $17.95 Pbk.Jacob Neusner. The Transformation of Judaism: From Philosophy to Religion. Pp. 343. (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1992.) $34.95. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 29 (1):137.score: 72.0
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  10. Peter Byrne (1993). C. Schwöbel and C. Gunton. Eds. Persons, Divine and Human. Pp. 165.(Edinburgh: T. And T. Clark, 1992.)£ 16.95. RM Hare. Essays on Religion and Education. Pp. 238.(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.)£ 27.50 BB Price. Medieval Thought: An Introduction. Pp. 261.(Oxford: Blackwell, 1992.)£ 40 Hdbk,£ 11.95 Pbk. H. Margenau and RA Varghese, Eds. Cosmos, Bios, Theos: Scientists Reflect on Science, God and the Origins of the Universe, Life and Homo Sapiens. Pp. 285.(La Salle: Open Court, 1992.) $38.95 Hdbk, $17.95 ... [REVIEW] Religious Studies 29 (1):137-138.score: 72.0
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  11. Joyce Coleman (2003). Ad Putter and Jane Gilbert, Eds., The Spirit of Medieval English Popular Romance. (Longman Medieval and Renaissance Library.) Harlow, Eng.: Pearson Education, 2000. Pp. Viii, 304. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (1):248-250.score: 72.0
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  12. Avner Giladi (1995). Gender Differences in Child Rearing and Education: Some Preliminary Observations with Reference to Medieval Muslim Thought. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 16 (2):291-308.score: 72.0
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  13. Michael A. Hicks (2003). A. J. Pollard, Late Medieval England, 1399–1509. (Longman History of Medieval England.) Harlow, Eng.: Pearson Education, 2000. Paper. Pp. Xviii, 454 Plus Black-and-White Plates; 3 Maps and 1 Genealogical Table. $16.99. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):983-984.score: 72.0
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  14. Hanns Hohmann (1999). Rhetoric in Medieval Legal Education: Libellus Pylei Disputatorius. Disputatio 4:59.score: 72.0
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  15. Lois L. Huneycutt (2003). Ralph V. Turner and Richard R. Heiser, The Reign of Richard Lionheart: Ruler of the Angevin Empire, 1189–99. (The Medieval World.) Harlow, Eng.: Pearson Education, 2000. Pp. Xii, 292; 1 Genealogical Table and 6 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):1009-1010.score: 72.0
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  16. David Luscombe (2004). Robert Black, Humanism and Education in Medieval and Renaissance Italy: Tradition and Innovation in Latin Schools From the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. Xv, 489; Black-and-White Frontispiece and Tables. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (1):139-140.score: 72.0
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  17. Ann Moffatt (2005). Catherine Holmes and Judith Waring, Eds., Literacy, Education and Manuscript Transmission in Byzantium and Beyond. (The Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies and Cultures, 400–1500, 42.) Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2002. Pp. Xiii, 268 Plus 17 Black-and-White Figures; Tables and 1 Map. $92. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (2):589-591.score: 72.0
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  18. Dominic J. O'Meara (1997). Paul A. Olson, The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature. Lincoln, Nebr., and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Pp. Xxi, 297. $40. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.score: 72.0
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  19. Valerie Ramseyer (2002). GA Loud, The Age of Robert Guiscard: Southern Italy and the Norman Conquest.(The Medieval World.) Harlow, Eng.: Pearson Education, 2000. Paper. Pp. Xii, 329; 8 Genealogical Tables and 5 Maps. $18.99. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (2):584-586.score: 72.0
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  20. Paula Sanders (1995). Jonathan Berkey, The Transmission of Knowledge in Medieval Cairo: A Social History of Islamic Education.(Princeton Studies on Die Near East.) Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992. Pp. Xi, 238; 3 Black-and-White Figures. $39.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (3):579-581.score: 72.0
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  21. Kent Emery, William J. Courtenay & Stephen M. Metzger (eds.) (2012). Philosophy and Theology in the Studia of the Religious Orders and at Papal and Royalcourts: Acts of the Xvth International Colloquium of the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Mediévale, University of Notre Dame, 8-10october 2008. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 60.0
    I. The Dominicans -- II. The Franciscans -- III. The Augustinians and the Carmelites-- IV. The Benedictines and the Cistercians -- V. The friars, philosophy and theology at papaland royal courts.
     
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  22. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Jahrhundert Und Die Entdeckung des Konzepts der Bildung Durch Wissenschaft. Berlin University Press.score: 60.0
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  23. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Berlin University Press.score: 60.0
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  24. Alfred Frederick Horrigan (1950). Metaphysics as a Principle of Order in the University Curriculum. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 60.0
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  25. Detlef Rohling (2012). Omne Scibile Est Discibile: Eine Untersuchung Zur Struktur Und Genese des Lehrens Und Lernens Bei Thomas von Aquin. Aschendorff Verlag.score: 60.0
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  26. Godefridus Sancto Victordee (1972). The Fountain of Philosophy: A Translation of the Twelfth-Century Fons Philosophiae of Godfrey of Saint Victor. Toronto,Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.score: 60.0
  27. William J. Courtenay (1989). Astrik L. Gabriel, The University of Paris and Its Hungarian Students and Masters During the Reign of Louis XII and François Ier.(Texts and Studies in the History of Mediaeval Education, 17.) Notre Dame: US Subcommission for the History of Universities, University of Notre Dame; Frankfurt Am Main: Josef Knecht, 1986. Pp. 238; 15 Black-and-White Facsimile Plates, 1 Color Facsimile Plate. $47. [REVIEW] Speculum 64 (2):427-428.score: 48.0
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  28. Chr Wordsworth (1887). Lectures on the Rise and Early Constitution of Universities, with a Survey of Mediaeval Education, A.D. 200–1350, by S. S. Laurie, A.M., Professor of the Institutes and History of Education in the University of Edinburgh. London: Kegan Paul, Trench & Co. 1886. Pp. V.—Xii.; 293. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (04):113-.score: 48.0
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  29. Rainer Haas (1970). H. Ott and J. M. Fleteher: The Mediaeval Statutes of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Freiburg Im Breisgau. Texts and Studies in the History of Mediaeval Education, No X; Notre Dame, Indiana 1964, 139 Pp. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 22 (1):95-96.score: 48.0
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  30. Mike Higton (2012). A Theology of Higher Education. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    In this book, Mike Higton provides a constructive critique of Higher Education policy and practice in the UK, the US and beyond, from the standpoint of Christian theology. He focuses on the role universities can and should play in forming students and staff in intellectual virtue, in sustaining vibrant communities of inquiry, and in serving the public good. He argues both that modern secular universities can be a proper context for Christians to pursue their calling as disciples to learn and (...)
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  31. Romanas Plečkaitis (2009). The Rise of Philosophy in Lithuania. Studies in East European Thought 61 (1):3 - 13.score: 36.0
    The first Lithuanians to be introduced to philosophy were young members of the gentry who studied in European universities at the end of the 14th century. The recently christened Lithuania strove to adopt Western culture and to present itself as a Western state. At the end of the 14th century, the Vilnius Cathedral School was founded. The elements of logic were probably taught there. The growth of the political and economic power of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania brought about the (...)
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  32. Julian N. Wasserman & Lois Roney (eds.) (1989). Sign, Sentence, Discourse: Language in Medieval Thought and Literature. Syracuse University Press.score: 36.0
    EDITORS' INTRODUCTION B he Vedas tell of a conversation between a young man, Shvetaketu, and his father concerning what the son had learned in his education ...
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  33. Gerardo Bruni (ed.) (1932). The De differentia retoricae, ethicae et politicae. Cincinnati [Etc.]Benziger Brothers.score: 36.0
    Edward Aloysius Pace, philosopher and educator, by J. H. Ryan.-Neo-scholastic philosophy in American Catholic culture, by C. A. Hart.- The significance of Suarez for a revival of scholasticism, by J. F. McCormick.- The new physics and scholasticism, by F. A. Walsh.- The new humanism and standards, by L. R. Ward.- The purpose of the state, by E. F. Murphy.- The concept of beauty in St. Thomas Aquinas, by G. B. Phelan.- The knowableness of God: its relation to the theory of (...)
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  34. Suzy Harris (2012). The University's Uncommon Community. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):236-250.score: 30.0
    In the UK, as elsewhere in the world, the global financial crisis has focused attention on the cost of public services and the need to reduce expenditure, not least in respect of higher education. This, however, raises a set of prior questions: What kind of society do we want? What is important to democratic society? What kind of higher education is desirable? The article takes Alasdair MacIntyre's critique of what he calls liberal capitalist society as a starting point for considering (...)
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  35. Ronald Lee Zigler (1999). The Formation and Transformation of Moral Impulse. Journal of Moral Education 28 (4):445-457.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the contributions of recent research on the brain to our understanding of moral development. These insights suggest that we must begin to think more seriously about the formation of moral impulse as the basis for moral development and education rather than simply moral reasoning. Far from providing entirely novel insights about the growth of morality, this research appears to underscore the insights advanced by the medieval Jewish philosopher Maimonides. Both Maimonides and current research from neuroscience portray (...)
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  36. André Goddu (2010). Copernicus and the Aristotelian Tradition: Education, Reading, and Philosophy in Copernicus's Path to Heliocentrism. Brill.score: 30.0
    Drawing on a half century of scholarship, of Polish studies of Copernicus and Cracow University, and of Copernicus's sources, this book offers a comprehensive re-evaluation of Copernicus's achievement, and explains his commitment to the ...
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  37. Frederick Eby (1940). The History and Philosophy of Educaton, Ancient and Medieval. New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc..score: 30.0
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  38. Christine James (2010). The Common Vernacular of Power Relations in Heavy Metal and Christian Fundamentalist Performances. In Rosemary Hill Karl Spracklen (ed.), Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics. Inter-Disciplinary Press.score: 24.0
    Wittgenstein’s comment that what can be shown cannot be said has a special resonance with visual representations of power in both Heavy Metal and Fundamentalist Christian communities. Performances at metal shows, and performances of ‘religious theatre’, share an emphasis on violence and destruction. For example, groups like GWAR and Cannibal Corpse feature violent scenes in stage shows and album covers, scenes that depict gory results of unrestrained sexuality that are strikingly like Halloween ‘Hell House’ show presented by neo-Conservative, Fundamentalist Christian (...)
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  39. Edmund Leites (ed.) (1988). Conscience and Casuistry in Early Modern Europe. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.score: 24.0
    This examination of a fundamental but often neglected aspect of the intellectual history of early modern Europe brings together philosophers, historians and political theorists from Great Britain, Canada, the United States, Australia, France and Germany. Despite the diversity of disciplines and national traditions represented, the individual contributions show a remarkable convergence around three themes: changes in the modes of moral education in early modern Europe, the emergence of new relations between conscience and law (particularly the law of the state), and (...)
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  40. John Walbridge (2010). God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book investigates the central role of reason in Islamic intellectual life. Despite widespread characterization of Islam as a system of belief based only on revelation, John Walbridge argues that rational methods, not fundamentalism, have characterized Islamic law, philosophy and education since the medieval period. His research demonstrates that this medieval Islamic rational tradition was opposed by both modernists and fundamentalists, resulting in a general collapse of traditional Islamic intellectual life and its replacement by more modern but far (...)
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  41. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 24.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  42. Niklas Luhmann (1989). Ecological Communication. Polity Press.score: 24.0
    Niklas Luhmann is widely recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the social sciences today. This major new work further develops the theories of the author by offering a challenging analysis of the relationship between society and the environment. Luhmann extends the concept of "ecology" to refer to any analysis that looks at connections between social systems and the surrounding environment. He traces the development of the notion of "environment" from the medieval idea--which encompasses both human and (...)
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  43. A. Louth (2004). Theology, Contemplation and the University. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (1):69-79.score: 24.0
    Theology was one of the original faculties of the medieval university, which grew out of the earlier monastic and cathedral schools, where theology was central. The purpose of theology in monastic education was to provide not simply information about theological topics, but to prepare one to contemplate God, contemplation being the true knowledge of God. Contemplation as the goal of intellectual development, however, goes behind the Christian education of monastery and university to the intellectual and cultural ideals of classical (...)
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  44. Herbert A. Davidson (2005). Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Moses Maimonides, rabbinist, philosopher, and physician, had a greater impact on Jewish history than any other medieval figure. Born in Cordova, Spain, in 1137 or 1138, he spent a few years in Morocco, visited Palestine, and settled in Egypt by 1167. He died there in 1204. Maimonides was a man of superlatives. He wrote the first commentary to cover the entire Mishna corpus; composed what quickly became the dominant work on the 613 commandments believed to have been given by (...)
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  45. Nico Jenkins (2013). A Continuous Act.. Continent 2 (4):248-250.score: 24.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  46. Tadeusz S. Tołłoczko (2006). The Mentor and the Trainee in Academic Clinical Medicine. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):95-102.score: 24.0
    Medicine is a scientific discipline, but it is sometimes difficult to separate what is scientific and what is a clinical, practical activity. Man is the object, but he is always the subject of medical research and therefore these two elements become closely bound together by a thread of moral interdependencies. Every mentor of a young academic and all institutions dealing with the teaching of and research into medicine must understand multidimensional, multifaceted, and multilevel aspects of their activity and give them (...)
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  47. I. Grattan-Guinness (ed.) (1994). Companion Encyclopedia of the History and Philosophy of the Mathematical Sciences. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The Companion Encyclopedia is the first comprehensive work to cover all the principal lines and themes of the history and philosophy of mathematics from ancient times up to the twentieth century. In 176 articles contributed by 160 authors of 18 nationalities, the work describes and analyzes the variety of theories, proofs, techniques, and cultural and practical applications of mathematics. The work's aim is to recover our mathematical heritage and show the importance of mathematics today by treating its interactions with the (...)
     
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  48. Ann Moss (1996). Printed Commonplace-Books and the Structuring of Renaissance Thought. Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    This is the first comprehensive study of the Renaissance commonplace-book. -/- Commonplace-books were the information-organizers of Early Modern Europe, notebooks of quotations methodically arranged for easy retrieval. From their first introduction to the rudiments of Latin to the specialized studies of leisure reading of their later years, the pupils of humanist schools were trained to use commonplace-books, which formed an immensely important element of Renaissance education. The common-place book mapped and resourced Renaissance culture's moral thinking, its accepted strategies of argumentation, (...)
     
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  49. Cary Nederman (1992). Character and Community in the Defensor Pacis: Marsiglio of Padua's Adaptation of Aristotelian Moral Psychology. History of Political Thought 13 (3):377-390.score: 24.0
    Although it has become commonplace to regard Marsiglio of Padua's Defensor Pacis (completed in 1324) as a quintessential work of medieval Aristotelian political theory, this view has been challenged for various reasons in recent years. Some scholarship has pointed to the superficial quality of Marsiglio's appeal to Aristotle's �authority�. Others have emphasized Marsiglio's decisive reliance on sources and doctrines which were quite at odds with his overtly Aristotelian commitments. A revealing measure of the depth of his Aristotelianism is perhaps (...)
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  50. Rosalie Helena de Souza Pereira (2007). Averróis e a República de Platão. Veritas 52 (3).score: 24.0
    About the Republic is the only commentary left by Averroes, the Commentator, so called on behalf of his commentaries on Aristotle’s work. Although the original in Arabic is lost, there is a medieval version in Hebrew and two later translations in Latin from the Hebrew version. Averroes’ Commentary on the ‘Republic’ – divided in three Books – can be considered an original work as only 1/3 of it corresponds to the platonic treatise. Averroes presents in it aristotelic concepts drawn (...)
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