Search results for 'Educational anthropology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marianna Papastephanou (2014). To Mould or to Bring Out? Human Nature, Anthropology and Educational Utopianism. Ethics and Education 9 (2):157-175.score: 122.0
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  2. Timothy G. Reagan (2000). Non-Western Educational Traditions: Alternative Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 96.0
    This text provides a brief, yet comprehensive, overview of a number of non-Western approaches to educational thought and practice. The history of education, as it has been conceived and taught in the United States (and generally in the West), has focused almost entirely on the ways in which our own educational tradition emerged, developed, and changed over the course of the centuries. Although understandable, this means the many ways that other societies have sought to meet many of the (...)
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  3. Owan C. Lee (1993). Educational Endeavors for Man and Society. S.W. Publisher.score: 90.0
     
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  4. Marilyn Strathern (ed.) (2000). Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy. Routledge.score: 70.0
    If cultures are always in the making, this book catches one kind of culture on the make. Academics will be familiar with audit in the form of research and teaching assessments - they may not be aware how pervasive practices of 'accountability' are or of the diversity of political regimes under which they flourish. Twelve social anthropologists from across Europe and the Commonwealth chart an influential and controversial cultural phenomenon.
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  5. Israel Scheffler (1985). Of Human Potential: An Essay in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 70.0
  6. Jerome S. Bruner (1996). The Culture of Education. Harvard University Press.score: 70.0
     
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  7. R. Buckminster Fuller (1979). R. Buckminster Fuller on Education. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 70.0
     
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  8. Frederick O. Gearing & Lucinda Sangree (eds.) (1979). Toward a Cultural Theory of Education and Schooling. Mouton.score: 70.0
  9. B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. A core (...)
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  10. Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.score: 64.0
    Anthropology, History, and Education contains all of Kant's major writings on human nature. Some of these works, which were published over a thirty-nine year period between 1764 and 1803, have never before been translated into English. Kant's question 'What is the human being?' is approached indirectly in his famous works on metaphysics, epistemology, moral and legal philosophy, aesthetics and the philosophy of religion, but it is approached directly in his extensive but less well-known writings on physical and cultural (...), the philosophy of history, and education which are gathered in the present volume. Kant repeatedly claimed that the question 'What is the human being?' should be philosophy's most fundamental concern, and Anthropology, History, and Education can be seen as effectively presenting his philosophy as a whole in a popular guise. (shrink)
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  11. Iba Fall (2010). Crise de la Socialisation au Sénégal: Suivi de Réflexion Sur les Ontologies Bambara Et Peule. L'harmattan.score: 60.0
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  12. James Lewis Henderson (1975). A Bridge Across Time: The Role of Myths in History. Turnstone Books.score: 60.0
     
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  13. Emer Hubert Staffelbach (1964). Moral Crisis in America. New York, Pagent Press.score: 60.0
     
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  14. Anna Szudra & Katarzyna Uzar (eds.) (2009). Personalistyczny Wymiar Filozofii Wychownia. Wydawn. Kul.score: 60.0
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  15. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Kyoyuk Ch'ŏrhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.score: 60.0
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  16. David Scott (2000). Realism and Educational Research: New Perspectives and Possibilities. Falmer Press.score: 58.0
    Much education research takes place under a convenient but spurious assumption that there is a common purpose to education research, and a common epistemology. This book takes a clear-sighted and perceptive look at the underlying truths of education research, and in refining our understanding of the subject paves the way to improving our methods and practice. It addresses the theoretical conceptual elements educational discourses that inform most debates about educational research, including: education and its relationship to research; the (...)
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  17. Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.score: 54.0
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in Agenda 21. Proc. (...)
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  18. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Ch'ŏrhakchŏk In'ganhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.score: 48.0
    Saram toem ui ttŭt -- In'gan ŭi sahoehwa wa sahoe ŭi in'ganhwa.
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  19. Dmitry Kuznetsov & Gennady Popov (2008). Current Anthropological Paradigm and “Anthropological Turning” of Engineering Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:151-160.score: 42.0
    By the end of the 20th century educational issues had become of global character due to the fact, that it is education that makes the basis for the social dimensions of the 21st century. The importance of educational issues can be explained by the post-industrial society being oriented at rising the significance of information and knowledge as being the main resources for the society development, at the priority of intellectual activities, resulting in changing the roleand place of education (...)
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  20. Vasileios E. Pantazis (2012). The “Encounter” as an “Event of Truth” in Education: An Anthropological-Pedagogical Approach. Educational Theory 62 (6):641-657.score: 42.0
  21. Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View (1798). In , Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world (...)
     
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  22. Tim McDonough (2011). Initiation, Not Indoctrination: Confronting the Grotesque in Cultural Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):706-723.score: 40.0
    The goal of this article is to differentiate initiation from indoctrination, and to return a positive significance to the notion of initiation, as a pedagogy that contributes not only to the perpetuation of a particular form of life or community, but that provides the next generation with means to advance that knowledge beyond its existing boundaries. When we conflate the terms ‘initiation’ and ‘indoctrination’ or only mark a minor difference between the two, we lose meaning. The explanatory and predictive power (...)
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  23. Amelie Rorty (2008). Review: Zöller & Louden (Eds), Anthropology, History and Education. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).score: 40.0
  24. P. Seamans (1996). A Socio-Anthropological Perspective of American Deaf Education. Diogenes 44 (175):41-53.score: 40.0
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  25. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2009). Anthropology, History, and Education (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 474-475.score: 40.0
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  26. Calogero Caltagirone (2013). "Dar-forma" all'umano: dimensione antropologica, etica ed educativa della bildung in Edith Stein // "Shaping" the human: anthropological, ethical and educational bildung in Edith Stein. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 18 (3):15-23.score: 40.0
    Il presente lavoro intende cogliere l’originalità e la fecondità della prospettiva di Edith Stein sul fondamento antropologico ed etico dell’educativo. Mediante l’analisi del radicamento antropologico della dimensione formativa, che si fonda sulla la struttura antropologica della persona umana, si pone l’obiettivo di offrire i fondamenti antropologici ed etici alla relazione educativa, concentrandosi sul senso dell’educazione intesa come formazione ( Bildung ) integrale dell’uomo.
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  27. Christy Hammer & R. Valentine Dusek (1996). Brain Differences, Anthropological Stories, and Educational Implications. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):257.score: 40.0
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  28. Kristján Kristjánsson (2014). Is Shame an Ugly Emotion? Four Discourses—Two Contrasting Interpretations for Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):495-511.score: 40.0
    This paper offers a sustained philosophical meditation on contrasting interpretations of the emotion of shame within four academic discourses—social psychology, psychological anthropology, educational psychology and Aristotelian scholarship—in order to elicit their implications for moral education. It turns out that within each of these discourses there is a mainstream interpretation which emphasises shame’s expendability or moral ugliness (and where shame is typically described as guilt’s ugly sister), but also a heterodox interpretation which seeks to retrieve and defend shame. As (...)
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  29. Chris Henry McTavish (2012). Louden Robert B. And Zöller, Günter, Eds., Immanuel Kant: Anthropology, History, and Education. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (2):108-110.score: 40.0
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  30. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education, and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. New York, P. Smith.score: 40.0
  31. Claudia Strauss (1984). The 1983 Stirling Prize Essay: Beyond “Formal” Versus “Informal” Education: Uses of Psychological Theory in Anthropological Research. Ethos 12 (3):195-222.score: 40.0
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  32. Tom Uytterhoeven (2014). Co‐Creating Co‐Creators? The “Human Factor” in Education. Zygon 49 (1):157-170.score: 38.0
    This article presents an example of the contributions the field of science and religion could offer to educational theory. Building on a narrative analysis of Philip Hefner's proposal to use “created co-creator” as central metaphor for theological anthropology, the importance of culture is brought to the fore. Education should support a needed revitalization of our cultural heritage, and thus enable humanity to (re-)connect with the global ecological network and with the divine as grounding source of this network. In (...)
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  33. Linda Neuhauser, Dawn Richardson, Sonja Mackenzie & Meredith Minkler (2007). Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M19.score: 38.0
    Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, students are often (...)
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  34. Christoph Wulf (2003). Perfecting the Individual: Wilhelm Von Humboldt's Concept of Anthropology, Bildung and Mimesis. Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (2):241–249.score: 36.0
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  35. Jim Mackenzie (2011). Holden's Public University and its Rawlsian Silence on Religion. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):686-706.score: 36.0
    Robert H. Holden, in ‘The Public University's Unbearable Defiance of Being’ (2009, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 41:5, pp. 575–591) argues that the public university ought to welcome the infusion of relevant beliefs, including religious ones, in carrying out its research and teaching responsibilities. In this paper, I examine whether he has shown that some opinions are suppressed, whether he has shown that other views are hegemonic, the central argument that lies behind his thinking, and then consider the educational (...)
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  36. Robert H. Holden (2009). The Public University's Unbearable Defiance of Being. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (5):575-591.score: 34.0
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  37. Michael S. Hogue (2010). Science and Religious Anthropology: A Spiritually Evocative Naturalist Interpretation of Human Life. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (3):269-275.score: 30.0
    In Science and Religious Anthropology: A Spiritually Evocative Naturalist Interpretation of Human Life, Wesley J. Wildman has awakened work in religious anthropology to a new day and a new kind of light. No one who works in religious anthropology, or in religion and science studies more generally, should be taken seriously who has not read, digested, and contended with Wildman’s work. Indeed, if one is looking for an education in genuine interdisciplinarity, in rigorous scholarly analysis and argumentation, (...)
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  38. C. Jaye (2004). Talking Around Embodiment: The Views of GPs Following Participation in Medical Anthropology Courses. Medical Humanities 30 (1):41-48.score: 30.0
    Objectives: To explore the ways in which general practitioners talk around the concept of “embodiment” after participating in introductory courses in medical anthropology, and to contribute to the debate about what persons and bodies mean for biomedicine. Design: This study used a qualitative interview methodology. Participants: Participants were general practitioners who had all completed at least one introductory course in medical anthropology. Results: In talking around embodiment, respondents articulated several interconnected dimensions of meaning. These included a Cartesian derived (...)
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  39. William M. Kurtines & Jacob L. Gewirtz (eds.) (1991). Handbook of Moral Behavior and Development. L. Erlbaum.score: 28.0
    The publication of this unique three-volume set represents the culmination of years of work by a large number of scholars, researchers, and professionals in the field of moral development. The literature on moral behavior and development has grown to the point where it is no longer possible to capture the “state of the art” in a single volume. This comprehensive multi-volume Handbook marks an important transition because it provides evidence that the field has emerged as an area of scholarly activity (...)
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  40. Rita Astuti, Jonathan P. Parry & Charles Stafford (eds.) (2007). Questions of Anthropology. Berg.score: 27.0
    Anthropology today seems to shy away from the big, comparative questions that ordinary people in many societies find compelling. Questions of Anthropology brings these issues back to the centre of anthropological concerns. Individual essays explore birth, death and sexuality, puzzles about the relationship between science and religion, questions about the nature of ritual, work, political leadership and genocide, and our personal fears and desires, from the quest to control the future and to find one's "true" identity to the (...)
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  41. Ciaran Sugrue (ed.) (2008). The Future of Educational Change: International Perspectives. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Divided into four sections, this book addresses the key themes: What has been the impact of educational change?
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  42. John Geake (2011). Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications of Educational Neuroscience Research: fMRI Studies of the Neural Correlates of Creative Intelligence. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):43-47.score: 27.0
    In this position statement it is argued that educational neuroscience must necessarily be relevant to, and therefore have implications for, both educational theory and practice. Consequently, educational neuroscientific research necessarily must embrace educational research questions in its remit.
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  43. Alex Means (2011). Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1088-1102.score: 27.0
    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Rancière. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Rancière's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a social movement and hunger strike organized for educational justice in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. This serves as a context for understanding how educational provisions are linked (...)
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  44. Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.score: 27.0
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of value creation (soka) and value-creating (...)
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  45. Stephen R. Campbell (2011). Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, Methodology, and Implications. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):7-16.score: 27.0
    ‘What does the brain have to do with learning?’Prima facie, this may seem like a strange thing for anyone to say, especially educational scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. There are, however, valid objections to injecting various and sundry neuroscientific considerations piecemeal into the vast field of education. These objections exist in a variety of dimensions. After providing a working definition for educational neuroscience, identifying the ‘mindbrain’ as the proper object of study thereof, I discuss, dispel or dismiss (...)
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  46. Jane Mulderrig (2011). Manufacturing Consent: A Corpus-Based Critical Discourse Analysis of New Labour's Educational Governance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):562-578.score: 27.0
    This paper presents selected findings from a historical analysis of change in the discursive construction of social identity in UK education policy discourse from 1972–2005. My chief argument is that through its linguistic forms of self-identification the government construes educational roles, relations and responsibilities not only for itself, but also for other educational actors and wider society. More specifically, I argue that New Labour's distinctive mode of self-representation is an important element in its hegemonic project, textually manufacturing consent (...)
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  47. Jan Nespor (2011). Devices and Educational Change. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5-6):15-37.score: 27.0
    This paper uses Actor Network Theory to examine two cases of device-mediated educational change, one involving a computer-assisted interactive video module that provided a half-hour of instruction for a university course, the other an assistive communication device that proved a supposedly retarded pre-school child to be intelligent. The paper explores how device construction instigated by middle-level organizational workers can ramify into organizational change, and extends Actor Network theory by augmenting some of its conceptual tools. I argue that the organizational (...)
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  48. Emma Smith (2008). Pitfalls and Promises: The Use of Secondary Data Analysis in Educational Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (3):323 - 339.score: 27.0
    This paper considers the use of secondary data analysis in educational research. It addresses some of the promises and potential pitfalls that influence its use and explores a possible role for the secondary analysis of numeric data in the 'new' political arithmetic tradition of social research. Secondary data analysis is a relatively under-used technique in Education and in the social sciences more widely, and it is an approach that is not without its critics. Here we consider two main objections (...)
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  49. Kathryn E. Patten (2011). The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.score: 27.0
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  50. Christine Parsons & Brian Fidler (2005). A New Theory of Educational Change: Punctuated Equilibrium: The Case of the Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutions. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (4):447 - 465.score: 27.0
    This article argues for a new theoretical paradigm for the analysis of change in educational institutions that is able to deal with such issues as readiness for change, transformational change and the failure of change strategies. Punctuated equilibrium (Tushman and Romanelli, 1985) is a theory which has wide application. It envisages long-term change as being made up of a succession of long periods of relative stability interspersed by brief periods of rapid profound change. In the periods of stability only (...)
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