Search results for 'Educational anthropology' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Timothy G. Reagan (2000). Non-Western Educational Traditions: Alternative Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 42.0
    This text provides a brief, yet comprehensive, overview of a number of non-Western approaches to educational thought and practice. The history of education, as it has been conceived and taught in the United States (and generally in the West), has focused almost entirely on the ways in which our own educational tradition emerged, developed, and changed over the course of the centuries. Although understandable, this means the many ways that other societies have sought to meet many of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Owan C. Lee (1993). Educational Endeavors for Man and Society. S.W. Publisher.score: 39.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 33.0
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. A core (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marilyn Strathern (ed.) (2000). Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy. Routledge.score: 33.0
    If cultures are always in the making, this book catches one kind of culture on the make. Academics will be familiar with audit in the form of research and teaching assessments - they may not be aware how pervasive practices of 'accountability' are or of the diversity of political regimes under which they flourish. Twelve social anthropologists from across Europe and the Commonwealth chart an influential and controversial cultural phenomenon.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Israel Scheffler (1985). Of Human Potential: An Essay in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 33.0
  6. Jerome S. Bruner (1996). The Culture of Education. Harvard University Press.score: 33.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. R. Buckminster Fuller (1979). R. Buckminster Fuller on Education. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 33.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Frederick O. Gearing & Lucinda Sangree (eds.) (1979). Toward a Cultural Theory of Education and Schooling. Mouton.score: 33.0
  9. Iba Fall (2010). Crise de la Socialisation au Sénégal: Suivi de Réflexion Sur les Ontologies Bambara Et Peule. L'harmattan.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. James Lewis Henderson (1975). A Bridge Across Time: The Role of Myths in History. Turnstone Books.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Emer Hubert Staffelbach (1964). Moral Crisis in America. New York, Pagent Press.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Anna Szudra & Katarzyna Uzar (eds.) (2009). Personalistyczny Wymiar Filozofii Wychownia. Wydawn. Kul.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Kyoyuk Ch'ŏrhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.score: 26.0
    Anthropology, History, and Education contains all of Kant's major writings on human nature. Some of these works, which were published over a thirty-nine year period between 1764 and 1803, have never before been translated into English. Kant's question 'What is the human being?' is approached indirectly in his famous works on metaphysics, epistemology, moral and legal philosophy, aesthetics and the philosophy of religion, but it is approached directly in his extensive but less well-known writings on physical and cultural (...), the philosophy of history, and education which are gathered in the present volume. Kant repeatedly claimed that the question 'What is the human being?' should be philosophy's most fundamental concern, and Anthropology, History, and Education can be seen as effectively presenting his philosophy as a whole in a popular guise. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Immanuel Kant (2006). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View (1798). In , Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Ch'ŏrhakchŏk In'ganhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.score: 24.0
    Saram toem ui ttŭt -- In'gan ŭi sahoehwa wa sahoe ŭi in'ganhwa.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Scott (2000). Realism and Educational Research: New Perspectives and Possibilities. Falmer Press.score: 23.0
    Much education research takes place under a convenient but spurious assumption that there is a common purpose to education research, and a common epistemology. This book takes a clear-sighted and perceptive look at the underlying truths of education research, and in refining our understanding of the subject paves the way to improving our methods and practice. It addresses the theoretical conceptual elements educational discourses that inform most debates about educational research, including: education and its relationship to research; the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rita Astuti, Jonathan P. Parry & Charles Stafford (eds.) (2007). Questions of Anthropology. Berg.score: 21.0
    Anthropology today seems to shy away from the big, comparative questions that ordinary people in many societies find compelling. Questions of Anthropology brings these issues back to the centre of anthropological concerns. Individual essays explore birth, death and sexuality, puzzles about the relationship between science and religion, questions about the nature of ritual, work, political leadership and genocide, and our personal fears and desires, from the quest to control the future and to find one's "true" identity to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ciaran Sugrue (ed.) (2008). The Future of Educational Change: International Perspectives. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Divided into four sections, this book addresses the key themes: What has been the impact of educational change?
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Geake (2011). Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications of Educational Neuroscience Research: fMRI Studies of the Neural Correlates of Creative Intelligence. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):43-47.score: 21.0
    In this position statement it is argued that educational neuroscience must necessarily be relevant to, and therefore have implications for, both educational theory and practice. Consequently, educational neuroscientific research necessarily must embrace educational research questions in its remit.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Alex Means (2011). Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1088-1102.score: 21.0
    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Rancière. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Rancière's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a social movement and hunger strike organized for educational justice in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. This serves as a context for understanding how educational provisions are linked (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Stephen R. Campbell (2011). Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, Methodology, and Implications. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):7-16.score: 21.0
    ‘What does the brain have to do with learning?’Prima facie, this may seem like a strange thing for anyone to say, especially educational scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. There are, however, valid objections to injecting various and sundry neuroscientific considerations piecemeal into the vast field of education. These objections exist in a variety of dimensions. After providing a working definition for educational neuroscience, identifying the ‘mindbrain’ as the proper object of study thereof, I discuss, dispel or dismiss (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jan Nespor (2011). Devices and Educational Change. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5-6):15-37.score: 21.0
    This paper uses Actor Network Theory to examine two cases of device-mediated educational change, one involving a computer-assisted interactive video module that provided a half-hour of instruction for a university course, the other an assistive communication device that proved a supposedly retarded pre-school child to be intelligent. The paper explores how device construction instigated by middle-level organizational workers can ramify into organizational change, and extends Actor Network theory by augmenting some of its conceptual tools. I argue that the organizational (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jane Mulderrig (2011). Manufacturing Consent: A Corpus-Based Critical Discourse Analysis of New Labour's Educational Governance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):562-578.score: 21.0
    This paper presents selected findings from a historical analysis of change in the discursive construction of social identity in UK education policy discourse from 1972–2005. My chief argument is that through its linguistic forms of self-identification the government construes educational roles, relations and responsibilities not only for itself, but also for other educational actors and wider society. More specifically, I argue that New Labour's distinctive mode of self-representation is an important element in its hegemonic project, textually manufacturing consent (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Emma Smith (2008). Pitfalls and Promises: The Use of Secondary Data Analysis in Educational Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (3):323 - 339.score: 21.0
    This paper considers the use of secondary data analysis in educational research. It addresses some of the promises and potential pitfalls that influence its use and explores a possible role for the secondary analysis of numeric data in the 'new' political arithmetic tradition of social research. Secondary data analysis is a relatively under-used technique in Education and in the social sciences more widely, and it is an approach that is not without its critics. Here we consider two main objections (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kathryn E. Patten (2011). The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.score: 21.0
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.score: 21.0
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of value creation (soka) and value-creating (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Helen Gunter & Peter Ribbins (2003). The Field of Educational Leadership: Studying Maps and Mapping Studies. British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):254 - 281.score: 21.0
    The field of educational leadership is multi-site, in which those who study and practice leadership are located within networks which connect across institutions and sectors. Charting the growth of this dynamic field is the central purpose of this paper and six interconnected typologies of knowledge production are presented: Producers, Positions, Provinces, Practices, Processes and Perspectives. We argue that these typologies enable those involved to generate descriptions and understandings of the interplay between researching, theorising and practising in educational settings. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Christine Parsons & Brian Fidler (2005). A New Theory of Educational Change: Punctuated Equilibrium: The Case of the Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutions. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (4):447 - 465.score: 21.0
    This article argues for a new theoretical paradigm for the analysis of change in educational institutions that is able to deal with such issues as readiness for change, transformational change and the failure of change strategies. Punctuated equilibrium (Tushman and Romanelli, 1985) is a theory which has wide application. It envisages long-term change as being made up of a succession of long periods of relative stability interspersed by brief periods of rapid profound change. In the periods of stability only (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Roger Slee (1998). Inclusive Education? This Must Signify 'New Times' in Educational Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (4):440 - 454.score: 21.0
    This paper argues that much of the growing body of research (on special educational needs) that claims to address inclusion for disabled students is not new, but rather a re-articulation of old ideas which fail to do sufficient justice to the demands of the 'new times,. The paper concludes with an outline of a research agenda that is more comprehensive in scope and more finely tuned into the politics of 'identity'.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David Kirk (2013). Educational Value and Models-Based Practice in Physical Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (9):973-986.score: 21.0
    A models-based approach has been advocated as a means of overcoming the serious limitations of the traditional approach to physical education. One of the difficulties with this approach is that physical educators have sought to use it to achieve diverse and sometimes competing educational benefits, and these wide-ranging aspirations are rarely if ever achieved. Models-based practice offers a possible resolution to these problems by limiting the range of learning outcomes, subject matter and teaching strategies appropriate to each pedagogical model (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Sally Power (2006). Markets and Misogyny: Educational Research on Educational Choice. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (2):175 - 188.score: 21.0
    This paper has arisen from a concern that much recent policy-related research on markets displays misogynistic tendencies. In both the media and academic accounts it would appear as though the blame for social and educational inequalities can now be laid at the door of women - particularly middle-class mothers. Through examining competing perspectives on how we might understand this attribution of blame, this paper argues that their guilt is best explained not through changes in behaviour but through the conjuncture (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.score: 21.0
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in Agenda 21. Proc. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.) (2011). Educational Neuroscience. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 21.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors.1. Introduction: Educational Neuroscience (Kathryn E. Patten and Stephen R. Campbell).2. Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, methodology, and implications (Stephen R. Campbell).3. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning? (Anthony E. Kelly).4. A Multiperspective Approach to Neuroeducational Research (Paul A. Howard-Jones).5. What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education? (Michel Ferrari).6. Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where will the journey take us? (Daniel Ansar1, Donna Coch and Bert De Smedt).7. Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Elza Venter (2004). The Notion of Ubuntu and Communalism in African Educational Discourse. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):149-160.score: 19.0
    The notion of ubuntu and communalism is of great importance in anAfrican educational discourse, as well as inAfrican Philosophy of Education and in Africanphilosophical discourse. Ubuntu is aphilosophy that promotes the common good ofsociety and includes humanness as an essentialelement of human growth.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Thomas Aastrup Rømer (2011). The Educational Thing. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):499-506.score: 19.0
    In this essay, I argue that education should be conceived of as a thing in itself. To lift this view, I present aspects of Graham Harman’s philosophy, a speculative realism that can be seen as a radical break with social constructivism and similar approaches. Next, I attempt to outline a rough sketch of an educational “thing”, drawing on concepts such as protection, love, swarm, tension and shadow. Finally, I briefly discuss some implications of this vision for philosophy of education. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Lisbeth Lundahl (2012). Educational Theory in an Era of Knowledge Capitalism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):215-226.score: 19.0
    Two related aspects of the present ‘knowledge capitalism’ stage of globalisation are discussed in this article: the transformation of education to make it more directly supportive of educational growth and competition, and the growing demands on educational research to provide scientific evidence for education policy and practice, using narrowly defined methods and techniques. It is argued that both developments have profound consequences for the construction and use of educational theory, and the vital need for critical discussion and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Birgit Schaffar (2014). Changing the Definition of Education. On Kant's Educational Paradox Between Freedom and Restraint. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):5-21.score: 19.0
    Ever since Kant asked: “How am I to develop the sense of freedom in spite of the restraint?” in his lecture on education, the tension between necessary educational influence and unacceptable restriction of the child’s individual development and freedom has been considered an educational paradox. Many have suggested solutions to the paradox; however, this article endorses recent discussions in educational philosophy that pursue the need to fundamentally rethink our understanding of education and upbringing. In this article it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Karsten Kenklies (2012). Educational Theory as Topological Rhetoric: The Concepts of Pedagogy of Johann Friedrich Herbart and Friedrich Schleiermacher. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):265-273.score: 19.0
    The debate concerning the relation of the theory of education and the practice of education is not new. In Germany, these discussions are an integral part of the development of educational science in the eighteenth century which is closely connected to Johann Friedrich Herbart and Friedrich Schleiermacher. Their concepts illustrate different answers upon the question of how to connect theory and practice in education. And although those answers are embedded in a very specific horizon of ethical and metaphysical ideas, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Leonard J. Waks (2006). Globalization, State Transformation, and Educational Re-Structuring: Why Postmodern Diversity Will Prevail Over Standardization. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (5-6):403-424.score: 19.0
    Over the past two decades the educational policies of neo-liberal nation states have exhibited contradictory tendencies, promoting both bureaucratic standardization of curriculum and standardized evaluation on the one hand, and postmodern diversification on the other. Despite recent increases in bureaucratic standardization, I argue that the economic, social and cultural effects of globalization will pressure these states towards postmodern diversification of educational arrangements to strengthen their perceived legitimacy.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Teresa N. R. Gonçalves, Elisabete Xavier Gomes, Mariana Gaio Alves & Nair Rios Azevedo (2012). Theory and Texts of Educational Policy: Possibilities and Constraints. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):275-288.score: 19.0
    In our paper we aim at reflecting upon the extent to which educational theory may be used as a framework in the analysis of policy documents. As policy texts are ‘heteroglossic in character’ (Lingard and Ozga, in The Routledge Falmer reader in education policy and politics, Routledge, London and New York, 2007 , p. 2) and create “circumstances in which the range of options available in deciding what to do are narrowed or changed” (Ball in, Education policy and social (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Frances K. Kochan (2002). Hope and Possibility: Advancing an Argument for a Habermasian Perspective in Educational Administration. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2):137-155.score: 19.0
    The emergence of postmodernism has stimulateddiscourse on the potential for using reason tocreate a just society. The discourse hascaused confusion and dissension in the field ofeducational administration as scholars seek tofind a means to blend concepts inherent in themodern and postmodern. The works of JürgenHabermas provide a means of dealing with thisdilemma and have some specific applications tothe practice of educational administration.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Haithe Anderson (2002). Educational Theory as a Writerly Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (3):219-228.score: 19.0
    Educational theory does not oppose educational practice, as manyseem to think; instead it is a form of practice and the action oftheory exists at two levels. At a cultural level theory ischaracterized by linguistic forms of action and at a social level it is characterized by the day to day practices thatorganize and reward the work of producing educational philosophy.While the social practices that govern the production ofphilosophy certainly beg for ethnographic attention,any consideration anthropologists or philosophers giveit (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Harbans S. Bhola (2002). A Discourse on Educational Leadership: Global Themes, Postmodern Perspectives. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2):181-202.score: 19.0
    Epistemology mirrors reality but notperfectly, and in the process molds reality butnot exactly as intended or anticipated. Horizontal interconnections also exist betweenand among epistemology, ideology, theory andpraxiology. However, these relations areneither deductive nor deterministic in naturebut are merely resonant, and then unclear,ambiguous and confounded. In this paper, thepoint is made that we need a grand reflectionon both our paradigms of reality and ourpredicaments of life as lived, to deal with thediscontent of humanity at this moment of thehistory of our civilization, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Paul Croll (2009). Educational Participation Post-16: A Longitudinal Analysis of Intentions and Outcomes. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (4):400 - 416.score: 19.0
    The issue of levels of participation in post-compulsory education has been emphasised by the current policy initiatives to increase the age to which some form of participation is compulsory. One of the acknowledged weaknesses of research in the field of children's intentions with regard to participation is the lack of longitudinal data. This paper offers a longitudinal analysis using the Youth Survey from the British Household Panel Survey. The results show that most children can express intentions with regard to future (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Susan Hart (1998). A Sorry Tail: Ability, Pedagogy and Educational Reform. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):153 - 168.score: 19.0
    This paper argues that if 'reforms' of education designed to raise standards leave unquestioned the notion of fixed differential ability, then they are likely to be self-defeating. It considers alternative ways of formulating knowledge about individual differences reflected both in the literature and in classroom practice, and concludes by making a case for further research to be undertaken to establish frameworks for teaching consistent with an anti-determinist view of individual potential.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jane Fowler Morse (2001). Intellectual Freedom and Economic Sufficiency as Educational Entitlements. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):201-211.score: 19.0
    This paper explores the historic philosophical contributions ofMill and Marx toward a comprehensive conception of intellectual freedomas a basic educational entitlement. In a perhaps surprising confluence,Marx's theory of a material base for freedom of thought is then extendedin a discussion of contemporary freedoms including, importantly,academic freedom and its implication for teaching, the profession andits training.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Fenwick W. English (2002). The Point of Scientificity, the Fall of the Epistemological Dominos, and the End of the Field of Educational Administration. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2):109-136.score: 19.0
    The point of scientificity, or pos,represents a place in history whereeducational administration was founded as ascience. A pos creates a field of memoryand a field of studies. A pos isepistemologically sustained in its claim forscientific status by a line of demarcation orlod. A lod is supported by truthclaims based on various forms ofcorrespondence. As these forms have beeninterrogated and abandoned, correspondence hasgiven way to coherentism and finally to testsof falsification. As falsification has shownto contain serious flaws when compared to theactual (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Stephen Hay (2009). Transforming Social and Educational Governance: Trade Training Centres and the Transition to Social Investment Politics in Australia. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (3):285 - 304.score: 19.0
    Prior to its election to office in 2007, the Australian Labor Party announced a commitment to introduce Trade Training Centres (TTCs) into all Australian secondary schools as an initiative of its Education Revolution. TTCs were proposed as a key element of Federal Labor's education and training policy that aimed to manage future risks to Australia's competitiveness in the emerging global economy and to support school-to-employment transitions for young people. This analysis adopts a governmentality framework to conceptualise the Federal Government's introduction (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000