Search results for 'Educational anthropology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Marianna Papastephanou (2014). To Mould or to Bring Out? Human Nature, Anthropology and Educational Utopianism. Ethics and Education 9 (2):157-175.
    Against narrow understandings of educational research, this article defends the relevance of philosophical anthropology to ethico-political education and contests its lack of space in the philosophy of education. My approximation of this topic begins with comments on philosophical anthropology; proceeds with examples from the history of educational ideas that illustrate what is at stake in placing realism, impossibility and education side by side; and moves to what anthropologically counts as realism or realistic expectations from education. The (...)
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  2. David Mills & Mary Huber (2005). Anthropology and the Educational ‘Trading Zone’: Disciplinarity, Pedagogy and Professionalism. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 4 (1):9-32.
    This article suggests that the notion of an educational ‘trading zone’ is an analytically helpful way of describing a space in which ideas about learning and teaching are shared within and between disciplines. Drawing on our knowledge of anthropology and the Humanities, we suggest three possible reasons for the limited development of such zones within academia in the UK and US. The first is the relatively low status of education as a discipline, and its perceived dependence on individualist (...)
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  3.  11
    Timothy G. Reagan (2000). Non-Western Educational Traditions: Alternative Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    This text provides a brief, yet comprehensive, overview of a number of non-Western approaches to educational thought and practice. The history of education, as it has been conceived and taught in the United States (and generally in the West), has focused almost entirely on the ways in which our own educational tradition emerged, developed, and changed over the course of the centuries. Although understandable, this means the many ways that other societies have sought to meet many of the (...)
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  4. Owan C. Lee (1993). Educational Endeavors for Man and Society. S.W. Publisher.
     
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  5. Jerome S. Bruner (1996). The Culture of Education. Harvard University Press.
     
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  6. Israel Scheffler (1985). Of Human Potential: An Essay in the Philosophy of Education. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    The concept of potential plays a prominent role in the thinking of parents, educators and planners the world over. Although this concept accurately reflects central features of human nature, its current use perpetuates traditional myths of fixity, harmony and value, calculated to cause untold mischief in social and educational practice. First published in 1985, Israel Scheffler's book aims to demythologise the concept of potential. He shows its roots in genuine aspects of human nature, but at the same time frees (...)
     
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  7.  81
    B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. A core (...)
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  8.  76
    Marilyn Strathern (ed.) (2000). Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy. Routledge.
    If cultures are always in the making, this book catches one kind of culture on the make. Academics will be familiar with audit in the form of research and teaching assessments - they may not be aware how pervasive practices of 'accountability' are or of the diversity of political regimes under which they flourish. Twelve social anthropologists from across Europe and the Commonwealth chart an influential and controversial cultural phenomenon.
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  9. Maxine Greene (1978). Landscapes of Learning. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  10.  17
    Theodora Polito (2005). Educational Theory as Theory of Culture: A Vichian Perspective on the Educational Theories of John Dewey and Kieran Egan. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (4):475–494.
    At the center of every well‐constructed theory of education is a philosophical anthropology‐reasoned speculation as to the origins on man's conditions in the history of culture, especially the particular phenomenon of consciousness that underlies historical periods. Using the lens of one of the most significant theories of culture produced, we examine the philosophical anthropological accounts reflected in the theories of John Dewey and Kieran Egan, which are responsible for their divergent educational plans.
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  11. Theodore Brameld & Clyde Kluckhohn (1959). Cultural Foundations of Education; an Interdisciplinary Exploration. Journal of Philosophy 56 (13):596-601.
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  12. Iba Fall (2010). Crise de la Socialisation au Sénégal: Suivi de Réflexion Sur les Ontologies Bambara Et Peule. L'harmattan.
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  13. R. Buckminster Fuller (1979). R. Buckminster Fuller on Education. University of Massachusetts Press.
     
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  14. Frederick O. Gearing & Lucinda Sangree (eds.) (1979). Toward a Cultural Theory of Education and Schooling. Mouton.
     
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  15. James Lewis Henderson (1975). A Bridge Across Time: The Role of Myths in History. Turnstone Books.
     
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  16. Emer Hubert Staffelbach (1964). Moral Crisis in America. New York, Pagent Press.
     
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  17. Anna Szudra & Katarzyna Uzar (eds.) (2009). Personalistyczny Wymiar Filozofii Wychownia. Wydawn. Kul.
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  18. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Kyoyuk Ch'ŏrhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.
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  19.  7
    Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in Agenda 21. Proc. (...)
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  20.  17
    David Scott (2000). Realism and Educational Research: New Perspectives and Possibilities. Falmer Press.
    Much education research takes place under a convenient but spurious assumption that there is a common purpose to education research, and a common epistemology. This book takes a clear-sighted and perceptive look at the underlying truths of education research, and in refining our understanding of the subject paves the way to improving our methods and practice. It addresses the theoretical conceptual elements educational discourses that inform most debates about educational research, including: education and its relationship to research; the (...)
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  21. Kyu-ho Yi (2005). Ch'ŏrhakchŏk In'ganhak. Yŏnse Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.
    Saram toem ui ttŭt -- In'gan ŭi sahoehwa wa sahoe ŭi in'ganhwa.
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  22.  21
    Christoph Wulf (2003). Perfecting the Individual: Wilhelm Von Humboldt's Concept of Anthropology, Bildung and Mimesis. Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (2):241–249.
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  23.  6
    Fethi Mansouri (2007). Cultural Diversity as an Educational Advantage. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (3):15-18.
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  24.  4
    Jin Chi & Nirmala Rao (2003). Parental Beliefs About School Learning and Children's Educational Attainment: Evidence From Rural China. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 31 (3):330-356.
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  25. Hugh Mehan (1988). Educational Handicaps as a Cultural Meaning System. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 16 (1):73-91.
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  26.  3
    Bryan R. Warnick (2007). Ethics and Education Forty Years Later. Educational Theory 57 (1):53-73.
    R.S. Peters’s 1966 book Ethics and Education is one of the most significant works in twentieth‐century philosophy of education. At least in the United States, however, it is now rarely read or discussed. In this essay, Bryan Warnick looks at the virtues and vices of Ethics and Education, examining some major criticisms of the book in light of key developments in philosophy and educational theory that have occurred since it was first published. He finds that some of the criticisms (...)
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  27.  30
    Tim McDonough (2011). Initiation, Not Indoctrination: Confronting the Grotesque in Cultural Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):706-723.
    The goal of this article is to differentiate initiation from indoctrination, and to return a positive significance to the notion of initiation, as a pedagogy that contributes not only to the perpetuation of a particular form of life or community, but that provides the next generation with means to advance that knowledge beyond its existing boundaries. When we conflate the terms ‘initiation’ and ‘indoctrination’ or only mark a minor difference between the two, we lose meaning. The explanatory and predictive power (...)
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  28.  5
    Vasileios E. Pantazis (2012). The “Encounter” as an “Event of Truth” in Education: An Anthropological-Pedagogical Approach. Educational Theory 62 (6):641-657.
    In this essay, Vasileios Pantazis examines how two philosophers having different orientations acknowledge and study the phenomenon of the “encounter” and its fundamental importance to human life and education. On the one hand, Otto Friedrich Bollnow drew on existential philosophy and philosophical anthropology in his analysis of the encounter, while Alain Badiou, on the other hand, used psychoanalysis, mathematics, and Plato in exploring the concept. The approach Pantazis takes in this essay aims at fusing the concept of the encounter (...)
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  29. Cynthia Lewis, Patricia E. Enciso & Elizabeth Birr Moje (eds.) (2007). Reframing Sociocultural Research on Literacy: Identity, Agency, and Power. Routledge.
    This landmark volume articulates and develops the argument that new directions in sociocultural theory are needed in order to address important issues of identity, agency, and power that are central to understanding literacy research and literacy learning as social and cultural practices. With an overarching focus on the research process as it relates to sociocultural research, the book is organized around two themes: conceptual frameworks and knowledge sources. *Part I, “Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks,” offers new theoretical lenses for reconsidering key concepts (...)
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  30. John U. Ogbu & With the Assist Davis (2003). Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement. Routledge.
    John Ogbu has studied minority education from a comparative perspective for over 30 years. The study reported in this book--jointly sponsored by the community and the school district in Shaker Heights, Ohio--focuses on the academic performance of Black American students. Not only do these students perform less well than White students at every social class level, but also less well than immigrant minority students, including Black immigrant students. Furthermore, both middle-class Black students in suburban school districts, as well as poor (...)
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  31.  67
    Immanuel Kant (2006). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View. Cambridge University Press.
    Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world (...)
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  32.  37
    John Geake (2011). Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications of Educational Neuroscience Research: fMRI Studies of the Neural Correlates of Creative Intelligence. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):43-47.
    In this position statement it is argued that educational neuroscience must necessarily be relevant to, and therefore have implications for, both educational theory and practice. Consequently, educational neuroscientific research necessarily must embrace educational research questions in its remit.
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  33.  53
    Jane Roland Martin (1994). Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum. Routledge.
    Changing the Educational Landscape is a collection of the best-known and best-loved essays by the renowned feminist philosopher of education, Jane Roland Martin. The volume charts the remarkable intellectual development of a thinker who has travelled distinctively across a changing educational landscape. Trained as an analytic philosopher at a time before women or feminist ideas were welcome in the field, Martin brought a philosopher's detached perspective to her earliest efforts to reconstitute the curriculum. Her later essays on women (...)
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  34.  32
    Mark Mason (2008). What is Complexity Theory and What Are its Implications for Educational Change? Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):35–49.
    This paper considers questions of continuity and change in education from the perspective of complexity theory, introducing the field to educationists who might not be familiar with it. Given a significant degree of complexity in a particular environment , new properties and behaviours, which are not necessarily contained in the essence of the constituent elements or able to be predicted from a knowledge of initial conditions, will emerge. These concepts of emergent phenomena from a critical mass, associated with notions of (...)
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  35.  25
    Keith Morrison (2008). Educational Philosophy and the Challenge of Complexity Theory. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):19–34.
    Complexity theory challenges educational philosophy to reconsider accepted paradigms of teaching, learning and educational research. However, though attractive, not least because of its critique of positivism, its affinity to Dewey and Habermas, and its arguments for openness, diversity, relationships, agency and creativity, the theory is not without its difficulties. These are seen to lie in terms of complexity theory's nature, status, methodology, utility and contribution to the philosophy of education, being a descriptive theory that is easily misunderstood as (...)
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  36.  8
    Peter Kemp (2006). Mimesis in Educational Hermeneutics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):171–184.
    Philosophy of education is regarded as an art of hermeneutics that integrates a theory of mimesis in its understanding of the educational transmission. The idea of the master is reconsidered in this perspective in order to overcome the old opposition between classicism and romanticism. In that way the author attempts to respond to the question: What is the secret to pedagogically sound education?
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  37.  12
    Ian Skoggard & Alisse Waterston (2015). Introduction: Toward an Anthropology of Affect and Evocative Ethnography. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):109-120.
    A growing interest in affect holds much promise for anthropology by providing a new frame to examine and articulate subjective and intersubjective states, which are key parts of human consciousness and behavior. Affect has its roots in the social, an observation that did not go unnoticed by Durkheim and since then has been kept in view by those social scientists interested in the emotions, feelings, and subjectivity. However, the challenge for ethnographers has always been to articulate in words and (...)
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  38.  21
    Alex Means (2011). Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1088-1102.
    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Rancière. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Rancière's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a social movement and hunger strike organized for educational justice in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. This serves as a context for understanding how educational provisions are linked (...)
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  39.  18
    Stephen R. Campbell (2011). Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, Methodology, and Implications. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):7-16.
    ‘What does the brain have to do with learning?’Prima facie, this may seem like a strange thing for anyone to say, especially educational scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. There are, however, valid objections to injecting various and sundry neuroscientific considerations piecemeal into the vast field of education. These objections exist in a variety of dimensions. After providing a working definition for educational neuroscience, identifying the ‘mindbrain’ as the proper object of study thereof, I discuss, dispel or dismiss (...)
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  40.  20
    Mark Mason (2005). A Justification, After the Postmodern Turn, of Universal Ethical Principles and Educational Ideals1. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):799-815.
    The implementation of education programmes in different cultures invites the question whether we are justified in doing so in cultures that may reject the programmes’ underlying principles. Are there indeed ethical principles and educational ideals that can be justified as applicable to all cultures? After a consideration of Zygmunt Bauman's postmodern rejection of the possibility of universal ethics, Ι cite and extend Harvey Siegel's defence of multiculturalism as a transcultural ethical ideal. I conclude the paper with a justification of (...)
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  41.  10
    Christine Parsons & Brian Fidler (2005). A New Theory of Educational Change: Punctuated Equilibrium: The Case of the Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutions. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (4):447 - 465.
    This article argues for a new theoretical paradigm for the analysis of change in educational institutions that is able to deal with such issues as readiness for change, transformational change and the failure of change strategies. Punctuated equilibrium (Tushman and Romanelli, 1985) is a theory which has wide application. It envisages long-term change as being made up of a succession of long periods of relative stability interspersed by brief periods of rapid profound change. In the periods of stability only (...)
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  42.  36
    Jane Mulderrig (2011). Manufacturing Consent: A Corpus-Based Critical Discourse Analysis of New Labour's Educational Governance. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):562-578.
    This paper presents selected findings from a historical analysis of change in the discursive construction of social identity in UK education policy discourse from 1972–2005. My chief argument is that through its linguistic forms of self-identification the government construes educational roles, relations and responsibilities not only for itself, but also for other educational actors and wider society. More specifically, I argue that New Labour's distinctive mode of self-representation is an important element in its hegemonic project, textually manufacturing consent (...)
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  43.  15
    David Kirk (2013). Educational Value and Models-Based Practice in Physical Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (9):973-986.
    A models-based approach has been advocated as a means of overcoming the serious limitations of the traditional approach to physical education. One of the difficulties with this approach is that physical educators have sought to use it to achieve diverse and sometimes competing educational benefits, and these wide-ranging aspirations are rarely if ever achieved. Models-based practice offers a possible resolution to these problems by limiting the range of learning outcomes, subject matter and teaching strategies appropriate to each pedagogical model (...)
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  44.  22
    Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of value creation (soka) and value-creating (...)
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  45.  14
    Emma Smith (2008). Pitfalls and Promises: The Use of Secondary Data Analysis in Educational Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (3):323 - 339.
    This paper considers the use of secondary data analysis in educational research. It addresses some of the promises and potential pitfalls that influence its use and explores a possible role for the secondary analysis of numeric data in the 'new' political arithmetic tradition of social research. Secondary data analysis is a relatively under-used technique in Education and in the social sciences more widely, and it is an approach that is not without its critics. Here we consider two main objections (...)
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  46.  12
    Kathryn E. Patten (2011). The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  47.  12
    Jan Nespor (2011). Devices and Educational Change. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5-6):15-37.
    This paper uses Actor Network Theory to examine two cases of device-mediated educational change, one involving a computer-assisted interactive video module that provided a half-hour of instruction for a university course, the other an assistive communication device that proved a supposedly retarded pre-school child to be intelligent. The paper explores how device construction instigated by middle-level organizational workers can ramify into organizational change, and extends Actor Network theory by augmenting some of its conceptual tools. I argue that the organizational (...)
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  48.  6
    Helen Gunter & Peter Ribbins (2003). The Field of Educational Leadership: Studying Maps and Mapping Studies. British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):254 - 281.
    The field of educational leadership is multi-site, in which those who study and practice leadership are located within networks which connect across institutions and sectors. Charting the growth of this dynamic field is the central purpose of this paper and six interconnected typologies of knowledge production are presented: Producers, Positions, Provinces, Practices, Processes and Perspectives. We argue that these typologies enable those involved to generate descriptions and understandings of the interplay between researching, theorising and practising in educational settings. (...)
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  49.  5
    Roger Slee (1998). Inclusive Education? This Must Signify 'New Times' in Educational Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (4):440 - 454.
    This paper argues that much of the growing body of research (on special educational needs) that claims to address inclusion for disabled students is not new, but rather a re-articulation of old ideas which fail to do sufficient justice to the demands of the 'new times,. The paper concludes with an outline of a research agenda that is more comprehensive in scope and more finely tuned into the politics of 'identity'.
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  50.  6
    Christer Fritzell (2006). On the Reconstruction of Educational Science. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):129–143.
    Ever since its formative years in the USA a century ago, the discipline of education has taken an uneasy stand on its own ‘scientific’ status, not least with regard to the basic issue of the relationships between theory and practice. When a science of education was introduced as a panacea for rational planning in the fields of schooling and teacher training, general solutions on a scientific basis were to underpin efficient steering at all levels. Presently, there are signs of similar (...)
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