7 found
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  1.  5
    Edward F. Becker (1975). Justice, Utility, and Interpersonal Comparisons. Theory and Decision 6 (4):471-484.
  2.  15
    Edward F. Becker (1971). Indeterminacy Defended. Philosophical Studies 22 (1-2):1 - 9.
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  3.  14
    Edward Becker (1975). Pure Reference: Linsky's Criticisms of Quine. Philosophia 5 (4):477-488.
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  4.  18
    Edward F. Becker (2012). The Themes of Quine's Philosophy: Meaning, Reference, and Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Conventionalism and the linguistic doctrine of logical truth; 2. Analyticity and synonymy; 3. The indeterminacy of translation; 4. Ontological relativity; 5. Criticisms and extensions; Concluding remarks: conventionalism and implications; Bibliography; Index.
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  5. Edward Becker (2014). The Themes of Quine's Philosophy: Meaning, Reference, and Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Willard Van Orman Quine's work revolutionized the fields of epistemology, semantics and ontology. At the heart of his philosophy are several interconnected doctrines: his rejection of conventionalism and of the linguistic doctrine of logical and mathematical truth, his rejection of the analytic/synthetic distinction, his thesis of the indeterminacy of translation and his thesis of the inscrutability of reference. In this book Edward Becker sets out to interpret and explain these doctrines. He offers detailed analyses of the relevant texts, discusses (...)
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  6. Edward Becker (2012). The Themes of Quine's Philosophy: Meaning, Reference, and Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Willard Van Orman Quine's work revolutionized the fields of epistemology, semantics and ontology. At the heart of his philosophy are several interconnected doctrines: his rejection of conventionalism and of the linguistic doctrine of logical and mathematical truth, his rejection of the analytic/synthetic distinction, his thesis of the indeterminacy of translation and his thesis of the inscrutability of reference. In this book Edward Becker sets out to interpret and explain these doctrines. He offers detailed analyses of the relevant texts, discusses (...)
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  7. Edward F. Becker (1976). W. V. Quine, "The Roots of Reference". [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 7 (3):235.
     
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