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  1.  176 DLs
    J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  2.  167 DLs
    J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  3.  117 DLs
    J. Allan Hobson & Edward F. Pace-Schott (2002). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sleep: Neuronal Systems, Consciousness and Learning. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3:679-93.
  4.  28 DLs
    Michelle Neider, Edward F. Pace-Schott, Erica Forselius, Brian Pittman & Peter T. Morgan (2011). Lucid Dreaming and Ventromedial Versus Dorsolateral Prefrontal Task Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):234-244.
    Activity in the prefrontal cortex may distinguish the meta-awareness experienced during lucid dreams from its absence in normal dreams. To examine a possible relationship between dream lucidity and prefrontal task performance, we carried out a prospective study in 28 high school students. Participants performed the Wisconsin Card Sort and Iowa Gambling tasks, then for 1 week kept dream journals and reported sleep quality and lucidity-related dream characteristics. Participants who exhibited a greater degree of lucidity performed significantly better on the task (...)
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  5.  15 DLs
    J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dream Science 2000: A Response to Commentaries on Dreaming and the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1019-1035.
    Definitions of dreaming are not required to map formal features of mental activity onto brain measures. While dreaming occurs during all stages of sleep, intense dreaming is largely confined to REM. Forebrain structures and many neurotransmitters can contribute to sleep and dreaming without negating brainstem and aminergic-cholinergic control mechanisms. Reductionism is essential to science and AIM has considerable heuristic value. Recent findings support sleep's role in learning and memory. Emerging technologies may address long-standing issues in sleep and dream research.
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  6.  12 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.) (2003). Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  7.  11 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott (2000). Nielsen's Concept of Covert Rem Sleep is a Path Toward a More Realistic View of Sleep Psychophysiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):983-984.
    Nielsen's concept of “covert REM sleep” accounts for more of the complexity in sleep psychophysiology than its conceptual predecessors such as the tonic-phasic model. With new neuroimaging findings, such concepts lead to more precise sleep psychophysiology including both traditional polysomnographic signs and neuronal activity in greater proximity to the actual point sources and distributed networks which generate dreaming. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen].
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  8.  10 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott (2005). Complex Hallucinations in Waking Suggest Mechanisms of Dream Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):771-772.
    Waking hallucinations suggest mechanisms of dream initiation and maintenance. Visual association cortex activation, yielding poorly attended-to, visually ambiguous dream environments, suggests conditions favoring hallucinosis. Attentional and visual systems, coactivated during sleep, may generate imagery that is inserted into virtual environments. Internally consistent dreaming may evolve from successive, contextually evoked images. Fluctuating arousal and context-evoked imagery may help explain dream features.
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  9.  5 DLs
    Amir Muzur, Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (2002). The Prefrontal Cortex in Sleep. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):475-481.
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  10.  2 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott (2003). Postscript: Recent Findings on the Neurobiology of Sleep and Dreaming. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press 335--350.
  11.  1 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1998). The Neuropsychology of Dreams: A Clinico-Anatomical Study. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (5):199-200.
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  12.  0 DLs
    David Kahn, Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1997). Consciousness in Waking and Dreaming: The Roles of Neuronal Oscillation and Neuromodulation in Determining Similarities and Differences. Neuroscience 78:13-38.
  13.  0 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott (2007). The Frontal Lobes and Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers 1--115.
     
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  14.  0 DLs
    J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Consciousness: Its Vicissitudes in Waking and Sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press
  15.  0 DLs
    Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (2007). Altered States of Consciousness: Drug Induced States. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell
     
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