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Edward Feser [17]Edward C. Feser [1]
  1. Edward Feser (ed.) (forthcoming). Aristotle on Method and Metaphysics. Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. Edward Feser (2013). Kripke, Ross, and the Immaterial Aspects of Thought. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):1-32.
    James Ross developed a simple and powerful argument for the immateriality of the intellect, an argument rooted in the Aristotelian-Scholastic tradition while drawing on ideas from analytic philosophers Saul Kripke, W. V. Quine, and Nelson Goodman. This paper provides a detailed exposition and defense of the argument, filling out aspects that Ross left sketchy. In particular, it elucidates the argument’s relationship to its Aristotelian-Scholastic and analytic antecedents, and to Kripke’s work especially; and it responds to objections or potential objections to (...)
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  3. Edward Feser (2013). The New Atheists and the Cosmological Argument. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 37 (1):154-177.
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  4. Edward Feser (2013). The Role of Nature in Sexual Ethics. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (1):69-76.
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  5. Edward Feser (2011). Existential Inertia and the Five Ways. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2):237-267.
    The “existential inertia” thesis holds that, once in existence, the natural world tends to remain in existence without need of a divine conserving cause. Critics of the doctrine of divine conservation often allege that its defenders have not provided arguments in favor of it and against the rival doctrine of existential inertia. But in fact, when properly understood, the traditional theistic arguments summed up in Aquinas’s Five Ways can themselves be seen to be (or at least to imply) arguments against (...)
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  6. Edward Feser (2011). The Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Rights. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. 23.
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  7. Edward Feser (2010). Classical Natural Law Theory, Property Rights, and Taxation. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):21-52.
    Classical natural law theory derives moral conclusions from the essentialist and teleological understanding of nature enshrined in classical metaphysics. The paper argues that this understanding of nature is as defensible today as it was in the days of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. It then shows how a natural law theory of the grounds and content of our moral obligations follows from this understanding of nature, and how a doctrine of natural rights follows in turn from the theory of natural (...)
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  8. Edward Feser (2010). Real Essentialism. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):482-486.
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  9. Edward Feser (2005). Personal Identity and Self-Ownership. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):100-125.
    Defenders of the thesis of self-ownership generally focus on the “ownership” part of the thesis and say little about the metaphysics of the self that is said to be self-owned. But not all accounts of the self are consistent with robust self-ownership. Philosophical accounts of the self are typically enshrined in theories of personal identity, and the paper examines various such theories with a view to determining their suitability for grounding a metaphysics of the self consistent with self-ownership. As it (...)
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  10. Edward Feser (2005). There is No Such Thing as an Unjust Initial Acquisition. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):56-80.
    Critics of Robert Nozick's libertarian political theory often allege that the theory in general and its account of property rights in particular lack sufficient foundations. A key difficulty is thought to lie in his account of how portions of the world which no one yet owns can justly come to be initially acquired. But the difficulty is illusory, because (contrary to what both Nozick and his critics assume) the concept of justice does not meaningfully apply to initial acquisition in the (...)
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  11. Edward Feser (2004). Self-Ownership, Abortion, and the Rights of Children: Toward a More Conservative Libertarianism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 18 (3):91œ114.
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  12. Edward Feser (2003). Hayek on Tradition. Journal of Libertarian Studies 17 (1; SEAS WIN):17-56.
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  13. Edward Feser, Robert Nozick. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  14. Edward Feser (2001). Qualia: Irreducibly Subjective but Not Intrinsic. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (8):3-20.
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  15. Edward Feser (1998). Can Phenomenal Qualities Exist Unperceived? Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (4):405-14.
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  16. Edward Feser (1998). Hayek, Social Justice, and the Market: Reply to Johnston. Critical Review 12 (3):269-281.
    Abstract David Johnston's Rejoinder to my defense of Hayek's critique of social justice, though it has the merit of attempting to deal with Hayek's claim that the very idea of social justice is incoherent (in a way other critics of Hayek have not), fails to undermine that defense. Johnston's suggested counterexample to Hayek's claim that talk of an injustice presupposes an agency responsible for the injustice is not even prima facie plausible; he overlooks crucial disanalogies between the pursuit (...)
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  17. Edward Feser (1997). Hayek on Social Justice: Reply to Lukes and Johnston. Critical Review 11 (4):581-606.
    Hayek's attack on the ideal of social justice, though long ignored by political theorists, has recently been the subject of a number of largely unsympathetic studies (those of Lukes and Johnston being the most recent) in which his critique is dismissed as at best simply mistaken and at worst frivolous. The responses to Hayek's case against social justice, however, fail to draw any blood, for they do not seriously deal with Hayek's central claim that the very notion of social justice (...)
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  18. Edward C. Feser (1997). Swinburne's Tritheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 42 (3):175-184.
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