26 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Edward Grant [25]Edward R. Grant [1]
  1. Edward Grant (2011). De Caelo, Commentaries on Aristotle's. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 247--251.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Edward Grant (2011). How Theology, Imagination, and the Spirit of Inquiry Shaped Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages. History of Science 49 (1):89-108.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Edward Grant (2011). The Middle Ages and Modern Science. Metascience 20 (1):185-190.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael R. McVaugh, Edith D. Sylla & Edward Grant (2011). Memoirs of Fellows and Corresponding Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America: John Emery Murdoch. Speculum 86 (3):855-857.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Edward Grant (2010). The Nature of Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages. Catholic University of America Press.
    When did modern science begin? -- Science and the medieval university -- The condemnation of 1277, God's absolute power, and physical thought in the late Middle Ages -- God, science, and natural philosophy in the late Middle Ages -- Medieval departures from Aristotelian natural philosophy -- God and the medieval cosmos -- Scientific imagination in the Middle Ages -- Medieval natural philosophy : empiricism without observation -- Science and theology in the Middle Ages -- The fate of ancient Greek natural (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Edward Grant (2009). The Fall and Foundations. Metascience 18 (1):43-51.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Edward Grant (2008). The Fate of Ancient Greek Natural Philosophy in the Middle Ages. Review of Metaphysics 61 (3):503-526.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carmela Vircillo Franklin, Paul Meyvaert, Jan M. Ziolkowski, Giles Constable, Edward Grant, John E. Murdoch, Robert W. Hanning, Anne Middleton, Roberta Frank & Larry D. Benson (2007). Memoirs of Fellows and Corresponding Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America. Speculum 82 (3):808-829.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Edward Grant (2007). A History of Natural Philosophy: From the Ancient World to the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Natural philosophy encompassed all natural phenomena of the physical world. It sought to discover the physical causes of all natural effects and was little concerned with mathematics. By contrast, the exact mathematical sciences were narrowly confined to various computations that did not involve physical causes, functioning totally independently of natural philosophy. Although this began slowly to change in the late Middle Ages, a much more thoroughgoing union of natural philosophy and mathematics occurred in the seventeenth century and thereby made the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Edward Grant (2004). Scientific Imagination in the Middle Ages. Perspectives on Science 12 (4):394-423.
    : Following Aristotle, medieval natural philosophers believed that knowledge was ultimately based on perception and observation; and like Aristotle, they also believed that observation could not explain the "why" of any perception. To arrive at the "why," natural philosophers offered theoretical explanations that required the use of the imagination. This was, however, only the starting point. Not only did they apply their imaginations to real phenomena, but expended even more intellectual energy on counterfactual phenomena, both extracosmic and intracosmic, extensively discussing, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Edward Grant (2001). God and Reason in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.
    Between 1100 and 1600, the emphasis on reason in the learning and intellectual life of Western Europe became more pervasive and widespread than ever before in the history of human civilization. Of crucial significance was the invention of the university around 1200, within which reason was institutionalized and where it became a deeply embedded, permanent feature of Western thought and culture. It is therefore appropriate to speak of an Age of Reason in the Middle Ages, and to view it as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Edward Grant (2000). God and Natural Philosophy: The Late Middle Ages and Sir Isaac Newton. Early Science and Medicine 5 (3):279-298.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Edward Grant (1999). Aertsen, Jan A. & Andreas Speer, Raum und Raumvorstellungen im Mittelalter (Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1998), xxi + 847 pp. 94 ills. DM 558.00 (cloth) ISBN 3 11 0157 16 0. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 4 (1):91-93.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Edward Grant (1997). Celestial Motions in the Late Middle Ages. Early Science and Medicine 2 (2):129-148.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Edward Grant (1993). Jean Buridan and Nicole Oresme on Natural Knowledge. Vivarium 31 (1):84-105.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Edward Grant (1992). Nature and Scientific Method. Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):149-151.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Edward R. Grant (1992). Medical Futility: Legal and Ethical Aspects. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):330-335.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Edward Grant (1989). Medieval Departures From Aristotelian Natural Philosophy.”. In Stefano Caroti (ed.), Studies in Medieval Natural Philosophy. L.S. Olschki. 237--56.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Edward Grant (1987). Pierre Duhem, Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. Trans. Roger Ariew. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1985. Pp. Xxxi, 601. $35. Abridged Edition in Translation of Le Système du Monde: Histoire des Doctrines Cosmologiques de Platon à Copernic, 10 Vols., Published by Hermann, Paris, 1913–59. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (4):927-929.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Edward Grant (1987). Ways to Interpret the Terms' Aristotelian'and'Aristoteliarnsm'in Medieval and Renaissance Natural Philosophy. History of Science 25:335-358.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Edward Grant (1986). Petrus Philomena de Dacia and Petrus de Sancto Audomaro, Opera Quadrivialia, 1: Opera Petri Philomenae; 2: Opera Petri de Sancto Audomaro, Ed. Fritz Saaby Pedersen. (Corpus Philosophorum Danicorum Medii Aevi, 10/1–2.) Copenhagen: Danish Society of Language and Literature, 1983. 1: Pp. 1–563; 16 Plates. 2: Pp. 564–859; Illustrations. 1: DKr 250. 2: DKr 150. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (1):248-248.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Edward Grant (1984). Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology. Noûs 18 (1):5-14.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Edward Grant (1981). Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Edward Grant (1980). Book Review:From Humanism to Science 1480-1700 Robert Mandrou, Brian Pearce. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 47 (3):498-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Edward Grant (1978). Aristotelianism and the Longevity of the Medieval World View. History of Science 16:93-106.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Edward Grant (1972). Nicole Oresme and the Medieval Geometry of Qualities and Motions. A Treatise on the Uniformity and Difformity of Intensities Known as 'Tractatus de Configurationibus Qualitatum Et Motuum'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):167-182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation