6 found
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  1. Edward H. F. de Haan & Alan Cowey (2011). On the Usefulness of ‘What’ and ‘Where’ Pathways in Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (10):460-466.
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    H. Chris Dijkerman & Edward H. F. de Haan (2007). Somatosensory Processes Subserving Perception and Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):189-201.
    The functions of the somatosensory system are multiple. We use tactile input to localize and experience the various qualities of touch, and proprioceptive information to determine the position of different parts of the body with respect to each other, which provides fundamental information for action. Further, tactile exploration of the characteristics of external objects can result in conscious perceptual experience and stimulus or object recognition. Neuroanatomical studies suggest parallel processing as well as serial processing within the cerebral somatosensory system that (...)
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    Edward H. F. de Haan, Andrew W. Young & F. Newcombe (1987). Face Recognition Without Awareness. Cognitive Neuropsychology 4:385-415.
  4.  9
    André Aleman, Edward H. F. de Haan & René S. Kahn (2004). Underconstrained Perception or Underconstrained Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):787-788.
    Although the evidence remains tentative at best, the conception of hallucinations in schizophrenia as being underconstrained perception resulting from intrinsic thalamocortical resonance in sensory areas might complement current models of hallucination. However, in itself, the approach falls short of comprehensively explaining the neurogenesis of hallucinations in schizophrenia, as it neglects the role of external attributional biases, mental imagery, and a disconnection between frontal and temporal areas.
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  5. Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.) (2001). Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press.
    Can we learn without consciousness? When the eminent neuropsychologist, Lawrence Weiskrantz first coined the term 'blindsight' to describe a condition whereby a patient could demonstrate that they were aware of some object, yet insist that they were completely unaware of its existence, the response from some in the scientific community was one of extreme skepticism. Even now, there are those who question the existence of unconscious learning, and the topic remains one of the most actively researched and debated in (...)
     
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  6. René van Hezewijk & Edward H. F. de Haan (1994). The Symbolic Brain or the Invisible Hand? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):85.
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