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  1. Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  2. Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Set Within a Tower of Faith Above a City of Power: Merian Validus.
    The Washington National Cathedral, set on the highest hill in the capital city of the world's greatest economic and military power, is an iconic location for an examination of the intersection of immaterial faith, material power, and human conscious experience. It is a location made even more symbolic due to the fact that surrounding the Cathedral on three sides are three private schools -- an elementary school (Beauvoir) to the east, a boys' school (St. Albans) to the south, and a (...)
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  3. Edward H. Sisson, 'A Great Fire Came to Be Kindled:' Unspinning Mr. Philbrick's Mayflower.
    Claims about the economic motivations of population groups in the American past are a staple of contemporary political argument, as polemicists of one side seek to impeach the moral standing of the other side by impeaching the moral standing of the forebears of the people on the other side. Sometimes such polemics are presented to the public in the guise of nonpartisan works of popular history. This paper, applying the training of a litigator in preparing an "opposition" or "reply" brief, (...)
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  4. Edward H. Sisson, A Proposal for State Legislatures to Pursue Impartial Audits of the Scientific Basis for Evolution as the State Teaches It in its High Schools, Colleges, and Universities.
    When the state buys and then provides to the citizens goods and services, the state may certainly choose to audit, independently and comprehensively, the quality of the goods and services so provided, particularly when citizens are reporting back that the goods or services are causing unwanted, deleterious effects. This principle applies to intellectual property -- information -- education -- as well as to other goods and services. In particular, it applies to the theory of evolution as taught by the state (...)
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  5. Edward H. Sisson, 'He Who Can Learn Things That Are Difficult, and Not Easy for Man to Know, is Wise:' An Address to the Students in Mit 10-250, Caltech 201 E. Bridge, and Similar Lecture Halls: Minds That Are the Greatest Natural Resource in the World. [REVIEW]
    How human beings came to exist in this physical world is a question that has preoccupied mankind for as long as history records; every religion offers an answer, and so too have philosophers of natural history from Aristotle and before. The year 2009 will see celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, progenitor of the theory - or fact, as its adherents see it - that gives the secular scientific world the "creation story" dominant today. Social (...)
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  6. Edward H. Sisson, Monuments, Memorials, and Spacecraft: A Test-Case in the Treatment of a Spacecraft as a Semiotic Artifact.
    All civilian, government-sponsored spacecraft, despite ostensibly having the primary purpose of scientific data-collection, are, within the advanced cultures that produce them, primarily symbolic objects, created by the people as a means of indicating, both to themselves and to all the world, what is in their hearts: what they value. These craft are a statement that we value learning, exploration, adventure, difficult endeavors, teamwork, precision, self-discipline, and intelligence. All such spacecraft are, fundamentally, semiotic objects. The fact that they collect data, although (...)
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