Search results for 'Edwin Johnson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Warren J. Samuels, Kirk D. Johnson & Marianne Johnson (2007). The Duke of Argyll and Edwin L. Godkin as Precursors to Hayek on the Relation of Ignorance to Policy. In The Legal-Economic Nexus. Routledge
     
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  2.  40
    Edwin Hutchins & Christine M. Johnson (2009). Modeling the Emergence of Language as an Embodied Collective Cognitive Activity. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):523-546.
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  3.  15
    Edwin Johnson (1971). The Homosexual in Prison. Social Theory and Practice 1 (4):83-95.
  4. Edwin Volberg Johnson (1934). Justice and its Practice. Alexandria, Va..
     
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  5. Clarence Edwin Johnson (1959). Your Destiny Among the Stars. New York, Pageant Press.
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  6.  24
    Samuel Johnson (2003). Samuel Johnson on Ireland. The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):254-256.
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  7.  17
    Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, Second Edition by Deborah G. Johnson. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  8.  43
    Paul Johnson (2009). Paul Johnson Wonders Whether Darwin Would Have Put Atheist Slogans on Buses. The Chesterton Review 35 (1-2):284-288.
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  9. Phillip E. Johnson, Denis Oswald Lamoureux & Michael J. Behe (1999). Darwinism Defeated? The Johnson-Lamoureux Debate on Biological Origins.
     
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  10.  11
    David M. Johnson (2013). M. Johnson, H. Tarrant Alcibiades and the Socratic Lover-Educator. Pp. X + 254, Figs. London: Bristol Classical Press, 2012. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-7156-4086-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):58-60.
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  11.  6
    Galen A. Johnson (1977). Hartshorne's Arguments Against Empirical Evidence for Necessary Existence: An Evaluation: GALEN A. JOHNSON. Religious Studies 13 (2):175-187.
    Is experiential evidence irrelevant to acceptance or rejection of belief in the existence of a Divine Being? Charles Hartshorne answers that it is indeed irrelevant, and this answer has an initial and, for me, continuing surprising ring to it. Specifically, Hartshorne makes two distinguishable claims: the traditional allegedly a posteriori arguments, the teleological and cosmological, are in fact incompatible with empiricist methodology and are disguised ontological arguments; the conception of God as necessary being demands that belief in such a being's (...)
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  12.  5
    Summer Johnson (2007). A Rebuttal to Dzur and Levin: Johnson on the Legitimacy and Authority of Bioethics Commissions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):143.
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  13.  5
    David K. Johnson (1991). Endnotes for Johnson, From Page 8. Inquiry 8 (4):27-27.
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  14.  4
    Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  15.  11
    James Turner Johnson (2000). Comment by James Turner Johnson. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):331-335.
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  16.  1
    Paul F. Johnson, Response to Laidlaw-Johnson.
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  17. Rhona Brown, Leslie A. Chilton, Timothy Erwin, Evan Gottlieb, Christopher D. Johnson, Heather King, James Noggle, Adam Rounce & Adrianne Wadewitz (2014). Beyond Sense and Sensibility: Moral Formation and the Literary Imagination From Johnson to Wordsworth. Bucknell University Press.
    Drawing on philosophical thought from the eighteenth century as well as conceptual frameworks developed in the twenty-first century, the essays in Beyond Sense and Sensibility examine moral formation as represented in or implicitly produced by literary works of late eighteenth-century British authors.
     
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  18. Alexander Bryan Johnson (1947). Alexander Bryan Johnson's a Treatise on Language, Ed. Berkeley, Univ. Of California Press.
  19. A. B. Johnson (1959). Alexander Bryan Johnson a Treatise on Language. Univ. Of California Press.
     
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  20. A. B. Johnson & Stillman Drake (1940). A.B. Johnson's a Treatise on Language or, the Relation Which Words Bear to Things. [S.N.].
     
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  21.  7
    Harold D. Lasswell (1935). Book Review:Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences: Edwin R. A. Seligman, Alvin Johnson; Vol. XI, Mor--Par; ; Vol. XII, Par--Pun. [REVIEW] Ethics 45 (2):246-.
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  22.  2
    James H. Tufts (1931). Book Review:Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences Edwin R. A. Seligman, Alvin Johnson. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (2):234-.
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  23. Glenn Vandervliet (1976). Edwin Broun Fred: Scientist, Administrator, GentlemanDiane Johnson. Isis 67 (3):506-506.
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  24.  58
    Mark Johnson (1993). Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. University of Chicago Press.
    Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors (...)
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  25. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and genetics. (...)'s book shows also how Aristotle's theory has profound implications for environmental ethics and for the theory of value in general. (shrink)
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  26.  5
    Elizabeth A. Johnson (2007). Quest for the Living God: Mapping Frontiers in the Theology of God. Continuum.
    'Since the middle of the twentieth century,' writes Elizabeth Johnson, 'there has been a renaissance of new insights into God in the Christian tradition. On different continents, under pressure from historical events and social conditions, people of faith have glimpsed the living God in fresh ways. It is not that a wholly different God is discovered from the One believed in by previous generations. Christian faith does not believe in a new God but, finding itself in new situations, seeks (...)
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  27.  20
    David Johnson (1999). Hume, Holism, and Miracles. Cornell University Press.
    David Johnson seeks to overthrow one of the widely accepted tenets of Anglo-American philosophy -- that of the success of the Humean case against the rational ...
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  28.  39
    Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). Focusing on Truth. Routledge.
    Focusing on Truth explores the question of what truth is, balancing historical with issue-orientated discussion. The book offers a comprehensive survey of all the major theories of truth. Lawrence Johnson investigates a number of closely related matters of truth in his inquiry, such as: What sorts of things are true or false? What is attributed to them when they are said to be true or false? What do facts have to do with truth? What can we learn from previous (...)
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  29. Clarence Sholé Johnson (2003). Cornel West & Philosophy: The Quest for Social Justice. Routledge.
    Cornel West's reputation as a public and celebrity intellectual has overshadowed his important contributions to philosophy. Professor Clarence Shole Johnson provides a rectification of this situation in this benchmark, thought-provoking book. After a brief biographical sketch, Johnson leads us through a comprehensive examination of West's philosophy from his conceptions of pragmatism, existentialism, Marxism, and Prophetic Christianity to his persuasive writings on black-Jewish relations, affirmative action, and the role of black intellectuals. Special focus is given to West's writings on (...)
     
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  30.  16
    Peter Johnson (1988). Politics, Innocence, and the Limits of Goodness. Routledge.
    The place of moral innocence in politics is the central theme of Peter Johnson's subtle and original book.
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  31. George Johnson, On the Trail of the Illuminati: A Journalist's Search for the “Conspiracy That Rules the World".
    Many readers encounter the history and mythology of the Illuminati for the first time in the course of reading Angels & Demons. They typically wonder if the Illuminati is a real organization in history and, if so, how much of Dan Brown’s description is accurate. To help answer that question, we turned to George Johnson, the well-known New York Times science writer. Johnson shares several interests with Dan Brown and fans of Angels & Demons: He has written extensively (...)
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  32.  30
    Christopher Johnson (1993). System and Writing in the Philosophy of Jacques Derrida. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an important new critical analysis of Derrida's theory of writing, based on close readings of key texts. It reveals a dimension of Derrida's thinking that has been neglected in favor of those "deconstructionist" cliches favored by much recent literary criticism. Christopher Johnson highlights the special character of Derrida's philosophy that comes from his contact with contemporary natural science and with systems theory. This study casts new light on an exacting set of intellectual issues facing philosophy and critical (...)
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  33.  6
    Chalmers Johnson (1988). The Japanese Political Economy: A Crisis in Theory. Ethics and International Affairs 2 (1):79–97.
    Late 1980s economic theory failed to account for Japanese-style economies. Leading thinkers ignored the success and achievements of these systems by passing them off as exceptions due to “cultural uniqueness,” or by altering the facts to fit their theories. Chalmers Johnson argues that the success of the Japanese economy is neither random nor a function of culture but due to policy, particularly to Japanese industrial policy.
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  34.  66
    Allan G. Johnson (1997). The Forest and the Trees: Sociology as Life, Practice, and Promise. Temple University Press.
    Johnson takes us into every nook and cranny of social life, from the meaning of "I love you" to the ravages of social oppression.
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  35. Peter Johnson (1999). The Philosophy of Manners: A Study of the 'Little Virtues'. Thoemmes.
    In The Philosophy of Manners Peter Johnson makes a compelling case for manners as a subject for investigation by modern moral philosophy. He examines manners as 'little virtues', explaining their distinctive conceptual characteristics and charting their intricate detail and relationships with each other. In demonstrating why manners are important to our mutual expectations, Johnson reveals a terrain which modern moral philosophy has left largely unmapped. Through a critical examination of the ethics of John Rawls and Alasdair MacIntyre, (...) shows how the nature of manners constitutes a philosophical problem both for liberalism and its critics. Taking the recent revival of virtue ethics as its broad starting point, The Philosophy of Manners discusses the 'little virtues' as they are treated in the Aristotelian and Kantian traditions of writing on ethics. Original features of the book include discussions of nameless virtues, the logical intricacy of the 'little virtues' which compose manners, and the nature of their orchestration by the more substantial virtues and moral concerns. The aim throughout is to give manners a philosophically defensible place in the moral life - a place which neither inflates nor understates their importance. --an examination of why manners are essential to moral literacy and an ethical society --the first work of its kind - no other ethical investigation concentrates on manners --relevant to the recent revival of interest in virtue ethics and any course in contemporary ethics --will provoke argument and disagreement. (shrink)
     
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  36.  42
    Julian Johnson (2002). Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Oxford University Press.
    During the last few decades, most cultural critics have come to agree that the division between "high" and "low" art is an artificial one, that Beethoven's Ninth and "Blue Suede Shoes" are equally valuable as cultural texts. In Who Needs Classical Music?, Julian Johnson challenges these assumptions about the relativism of cultural judgements. The author maintains that music is more than just "a matter of taste": while some music provides entertainment, or serves as background noise, other music claims to (...)
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  37.  1
    Edwin F. Beschler (2007). The Immigrants: Academic Press: Walter J. Johnson and Kurt Jacoby. Logos: Journal of the World Book Community 18 (3):153-166.
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  38. Timothy Perrine (2015). A Note on Johnson’s ‘A Refutation of Skeptical Theism’. Sophia 54 (1):35-43.
    In a recent article, David Kyle Johnson has claimed to have provided a ‘refutation’ of skeptical theism. Johnson’s refutation raises several interesting issues. But in this note, I focus on only one—an implicit principle Johnson uses in his refutation to update probabilities after receiving new evidence. I argue that this principle is false. Consequently, Johnson’s refutation, as it currently stands, is undermined.
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  39. Robert T. Pennock (1996). Naturalism, Evidence and Creationism: The Case of Phillip Johnson. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):543-559.
    Phillip Johnson claims that Creationism is a better explanation of the existence and characteristics of biological species than is evolutionary theory. He argues that the only reason biologists do not recognize that Creationist's negative arguments against Darwinism have proven this is that they are wedded to a biased ideological philosophy —Naturalism — which dogmatically denies the possibility of an intervening creative god. However,Johnson fails to distinguish Ontological Naturalism from Methodological Naturalism. Science makes use of the latter and I (...)
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  40.  7
    Christopher W. Tindale (2002). A Concept Divided: Ralph Johnson's Definition of Argument. [REVIEW] Argumentation 16 (3):299-309.
    Ralph Johnson's Manifest Rationality (2000) is a major contribution to the field of informal logic, but the concept of argument that is central to its project suffers from a tension between the components that comprise it. This paper explores and addresses that tension by examining the implications of each of five aspects of the definition of ‘argument’.
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  41.  4
    Tone Kvernbekk (2008). Johnson, MacIntyre, and the Practice of Argumentation. Informal Logic 28 (3):262-278.
    This article is a discussion of Ralph Johnson’s concept of practice of argumentation. Such practice is characterized by three properties: (1) It is teleological, (2) it is dialectical, and (3) it is manifestly rational. I argue that Johnson’s preferred definition of practice—which is Alasdair MacIntyre’s concept of practice as a human activity with internal goods accessible through partcipation in that same activity—does not fit these properties or features. I also suggest that this failure should not require Johnson (...)
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  42.  8
    Leo Groarke (2002). Johnson on the Metaphysics of Argument. Argumentation 16 (3):277-286.
    This paper responds to two aspects of Ralph Johnson's Manifest Rationality (2000). The first is his critique of deductivism. The second is his failure to make room for some species of argument (e.g., visual and kisceral arguments) proposed by recent commentators. In the first case, Johnson holds that argumentation theorists have adopted a notion of argument which is too narrow. In the second, that they have adopted one which is too broad. I discuss the case Johnson makes (...)
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  43. Fred Parker (2003). Scepticism and Literature: An Essay on Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson. OUP Oxford.
    In this first study of the role of scepticism in literature, Fred Parker offers a lively and stimulating introduction to key issues in eighteenth-century literature and philosophy. Parker traces the presence of sceptical thinking in works by Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson, relates it more broadly to the social self-consciousness of eighteenth-century culture, and discusses its source in Locke and its inspiration in Montaigne.
     
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  44.  13
    David Botting (2016). Johnson and the Soundness Doctrine. Argumentation 30 (4):501-525.
    Why informal logic? Informal logic is a group of proposals meant to contrast with, replace, and reject formal logic, at least for the analysis and evaluation of everyday arguments. Why reject formal logic? Formal logic is criticized and claimed to be inadequate because of its commitment to the soundness doctrine. In this paper I will examine and try to respond to some of these criticisms. It is not my aim to examine every argument ever given against formal logic; I am (...)
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  45. Stillman Drake (1944). A.B. Johnson and His Works on Language. Illinois Institute of Technology.
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  46. Jerry A. Fodor (1979). In Reply to Philip Johnson-Laird's What's Wrong with Grandma's Guide to Procedural Semantics: A Reply to Jerry Fodor. Cognition 7 (March):93-95.
     
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  47. Nicholas Hudson (1984). Studies in the Moral and Religious Thought of Johnson.
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  48.  6
    Thomas P. Kasulis & Robert Cummings Neville (eds.) (1997). The Recovery of Philosophy in America: Essays in Honor of John Edwin Smith. State University of New York Press.
    This collection of essays by leading American philosophers honors John E. Smith, a major figure in the struggle for the American profession of philosophy to redefine itself and return to its grander traditions.
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  49. Robert J. Mayhew (1997). Geography and Literature in Historical Context Samuel Johnson and Eighteenth-Century English Conceptions of Geography. School of Geography, University of Oxford.
     
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  50. Robert J. Mayhew (1996). Samuel Johnson on Landscape, Natural Knowledge and Geography a Contextual Approach.
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