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  1. Efraim Podoksik (ed.) (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Oakeshott. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Efraim Podoksik; Part I. Oakeshott's Philosophy: 1. Oakeshott as philosopher James Alexander; 2. Worlds of experience: history Luke O'Sullivan; 3. Worlds of experience: science Byron Kaldis; 4. Worlds of experience: aesthetics Elizabeth Corey; 5. Education as conversation Kevin Williams; Part II. Oakeshott on Morality, Society and Politics: 6. Practical life and the critique of rationalism Steven Smith; 7. Oakeshott's ideological politics: conservative or liberal? Andrew Gamble; 8. Rhetoric and political language Terry Nardin; 9. Oakeshott's On (...)
     
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  2. Efraim Podoksik (2010). One Concept of Liberty: Towards Writing the History of a Political Concept. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (2):219-240.
  3. Efraim Podoksik (2009). Commentary on Elizabeth Corey's Interpretation of Michael Oakeshott. Zygon 44 (1):223-226.
    Elizabeth Corey suggests that in order to understand Michael Oakeshott's worldview one should pay special attention to two subjects, religion and aesthetics, and analyze the connection between these two realms and the idea of practical life in general and of politics in particular. Her book provides a sympathetic but also critical conversation with Oakeshott's ideas, ultimately offering us a coherent picture of the place of the religious, poetical, and political in the totality of his thought. Corey persuasively shows that the (...)
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  4. Efraim Podoksik (2009). The Contract of Fallibility. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):394.
  5. Efraim Podoksik (2009). The Idealism of Young Oakeshott. In James Connelly & Stamatoula Panagakou (eds.), Anglo-American Idealism: Thinkers and Ideas / [Edited by] James Connelly and Stamatoula Panagakou. Peter Lang.
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  6. Efraim Podoksik (2008). Anti-Totalitarian Ambiguities: Jacob Talmon and Michael Oakeshott. History of European Ideas 34 (2):206-219.
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  7. Efraim Podoksik (2005). How Oakeshott Became an Oakeshottean. European Journal of Political Theory 4 (1):67-88.
    Two ideas lie at the heart of Oakeshott’s philosophy: the notion of the inherent plurality of modern experience and the notion of a modern state as a purposeless civil association. These ideas signify Oakeshott’s rejection of the intellectual tradition of British Idealism by which he was influenced in his twenties. The breaking point was the publication of Experience and its Modes, although, with regard to social philosophy, the process of the abandonment of holistic Idealism lasted longer and was completed only (...)
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  8. Efraim Podoksik (2004). The Scientific Positivism of Michael Oakeshott. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):297 – 318.
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  9. Efraim Podoksik (2003). Oakeshott's Theory of Freedom as Recognized Contingency. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (1):57-77.
    This article argues that Oakeshott's theory of freedom possesses a greater degree of coherence than is often perceived. Freedom in Oakeshott's philosophy may be defined as `recognized contingency', combining the notions of a genuine choice of action and of an agent's awareness of having such a choice. Oakeshott employs his notion of freedom in two different contexts. One is the context in which freedom is understood as a concept distinguishing what is conceived as `human' from what is conceived as `non-human'. (...)
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  10. Efraim Podoksik (2002). The Voice of Poetry in the Thought of Michael Oakeshott. Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (4):717-733.
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