Search results for 'Ego' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anneliese Ego & Hans-Uwe Lammel (1994). Animalischer Magnetismus oder Aufklarung. Eine mentalitats-geschichtliche Studie um ein Heilkonzept im 18. Jahrhundert. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (3):493.score: 30.0
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  2. Helena de Preester (2008). From Ego to Alter Ego : Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and a Layered Approach to Intersubjectivity. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):133-142.score: 24.0
    This article presents two different phenomenological paths leading from ego to alter ego: a Husserlian and a Merleau-Pontian way of thinking. These two phenomenological paths serve (...)to disentangle the conceptualphilosophical underpinning of the mirror neurons system hypothesis, in which both ways of thinking are entwined. A Merleau-Pontian re-reading of the mirror neurons system theory is proposed, in which the characteristics of mirror neurons are effectively used in the explanation of action understanding and imitation. This proposal uncovers the remaining necessary presupposition of a minimalized version of the Husserlian concept of pairing and its recent and improved version in terms of the intermodal system. This leads to a layered approach to the constitution of intersubjectivity. (shrink)
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  3. Richard A. Lynch (2008). The Alienating Mirror: Toward a Hegelian Critique of Lacan on Ego-Formation. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (2):209 - 221.score: 24.0
    This article brings out certain philosophical difficulties in Lacans account of the mirror stage, the initial moment of the subjects development. For Lacan, theoriginal organization (...) of the forms of the egoisprecipitatedin an infants self-recognition in a mirror image; this event is explicitly prior to any social interactions. A Hegelian objection to the Lacanian account argues that social interaction and recognition of others by infants are necessary prerequisites for infantscapacity to recognize themselves in a mirror image. Thus mutual recognition with another, rather than self-recognition in a mirror, is what makes possible subsequent ego-formation and self-consciousness. This intersubjective critique suggests that many of the psychoanalytic consequences that Lacan derives from the mirror stage (e.g., alienation, narcissism, and aggressivity) may need to be rethought. (shrink)
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  4. Michael Cholbi (2014). The Implications of Ego Depletion for the Ethics and Politics of Manipulation. In C. Coons M. E. Weber (ed.), Manipulation:Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press. 201-220.score: 24.0
    A significant body of research suggests that self-control and willpower are resources that become depleted as they are exercised. Having to exert self-control and willpower draws (...) down the reservoir of these resources and make subsequent such exercises more difficult. Thisego depletionrenders individuals more susceptible to manipulation by exerting non-rational influences on our choice and conduct. In particular, ego depletion results in later choices being less governable by our powers of self-control and willpower than earlier choices. I draw out three implications of this phenomenon: first, manipulation can exploit ego depletion through the fashioning of social environments that tax willpower or self-control; second, ego depletion undermines the Platonic-Aristotelian picture of character and strength of will; and third, ego depletion needs to be a more central focus of theorists of justice, since it appears to be a significant contributor to poverty and other persistent injustices. (shrink)
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  5. Adam J. Rock, Jessica M. Wilson, Luke J. Johnston & Janelle V. Levesque (2008). Ego Boundaries, Shamanic-Like Techniques, and Subjective Experience: An Experimental Study. Anthropology of Consciousness 19 (1):60-83.score: 24.0
    The subjective effects and therapeutic potential of the shamanic practice of journeying is well known. However, previous research has neglected to provide a comprehensive assessment of the (...)
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  6. Gail Soffer (1998). The Other as Alter Ego: A Genetic Approach. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 15 (3):151-166.score: 24.0
    It is an ancient view, to be found even in Aristotles analysis of friendship, that the other is an alter ego, another myself. More recently, this (...)conception has provoked spirited debate within and without the phenomenological tradition. It can be found in a wide variety of texts, from Husserls Cartesian Meditations to Thomas NagelsWhat is it like to be a bat?” The basic position can be summarized as follows. Intentional experiences are subjective, first-person experiences, not objective, third-person experiences. (shrink)
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  7. Victor Molchanov (2009). The Ego: The Problem and the Term as Treated by Russian Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 61 (2/3):181 - 188.score: 24.0
    The starting point of the investigation is the correspondence between the term and concept of Ego ("I") and the various types of experience. Two main ways of (...)
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  8. Fernando Rodríguez (2009). El liberalismo de la trascendencia del ego. Apuntes Filosóficos 35 (35):161-170.score: 24.0
    El propósito de este ensayo es mostrar los logros iniciales, pero decisivos, que Sartre gana para la futura constitución de su ontología fenomenológica. Además se señalan los (...)
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  9. Jacob Rogozinski (2010). The Ego and the Flesh: An Introduction to Egoanalysis. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    Ego sum moribundus, or Heidegger's call -- I am the dead person I see in the mirror, or Lacan's subject -- Return to Descartes -- the equivocations of (...) phenomenology -- The field of immanence -- The carnal synthesis, the chiasm -- How touching touches itself touching : the (im)possibility of the chiasm -- In contact with the untouchable : the remainder -- This is (not) my body : the remainder of incorporation -- Beyond the other -- The crisis of the chiasm -- From hatred to love -- From archi-agony to resurrection -- Toward deliverance (instasy). (shrink)
     
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  10. Toru Tani (2008). The Ego, the Other and the Primal Fact. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):385-399.score: 21.0
    Japan has absorbed many western ideas since the late nineteenth century, but Japanese philosophers have often been reluctant to accept the western idea of theIin (...)
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  11. Kenneth Newman (2001). Is There Consciousness Outside the Ego? International Journal of Psychotherapy 6 (3):257-271.score: 21.0
  12. F. J. Shaw & A. Spooner (1945). Selective Forgetting When the Subject is Not 'Ego-Involved.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (3):242.score: 21.0
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  13. Thelma G. Alper (1948). Task-Orientation and Ego-Orientation as Factors in Reminiscence. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (3):224-238.score: 21.0
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  14. H. B. Lewis (1944). An Experimental Study of the Role of the Ego in Work. I. The Role of the Ego in Coöperative Work. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (2):113.score: 21.0
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  15. Concetta V. Romanow (1958). Anxiety Level and Ego Involvement as Factors in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):166.score: 21.0
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  16. S. Rosenzweig (1943). An Experimental Study of 'Repression' with Special Reference to Need-Persistive and Ego-Defensive Reactions to Frustration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (1):64.score: 21.0
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  17. H. B. Lewis & M. Franklin (1944). An Experimental Study of the Role of the Ego in Work. II. The Significance of Task-Orientation in Work. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (3):195.score: 21.0
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  18. Eduard Marbach (2000). The Place for an Ego in Current Research. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Exploring the Self: Philosophical and Psychopathological Perspectives on Self-Experience. John Benjamins.score: 21.0
  19. Mary E. Reuder (1956). The Effect of Ego Orientation and Problem Difficulty on Muscle Action Potentials. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):142.score: 21.0
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  20. Alan Watts (1975). Ego. Celestial Arts.score: 21.0
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  21. Iker Garcia (2010). Untrue to One's Own Self: Sartre's The Transcendence of the Ego. Sartre Studies International 15 (2):17-34.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I elicit a number of ways in which, according to the Sartre of The Transcendence of the Ego, we can miss the truth about (...)
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  22. Roland Breeur (2001). Bergson's and Sartre's Account of the Self in Relation to the Transcendental Ego. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (2):177 – 198.score: 18.0
    In The Transcendence of the Ego Sartre deals with the idea of the self and of its relation to what he calls 'pure consciousness'. Pure consciousness is (...)
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  23. Alfredo Ferrarin (1994). Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):645-659.score: 18.0
    Husserl on the Ego and its Eidos (Cartesian Meditations, IV) ALFREDO FERRARIN THE THEORY OF the intentionality of consciousness is essential for Husserl's philosophy, and in (...)particular for his mature theory of the ego. But it runs into serious difficulties when it has to account for consciousness's transcendental constitution of its own reflective experience and its relation to immanent time. This intricate knot, the inseparability of time and constitution, is most visibly displayed in Husserl's writings from the 192os up to the notion of the eidos ego in the fourth Cartesian Meditation. In this paper I want to dwell on the most problematic aspects of this theory. After a few preliminary remarks about the intentionality of consciousness (sec- tion 1), I try to place the theory of the substrate of habitualities in the context of Husserl's evolution on the issue of the reflection of the ego on itself (section ~). I briefly follow the threads of Husserl's shifting position from the Logical Investi- gat/ons and Ideas I to Ideas II, the Cartesian Meditations and the Cr/s/s. I indicate Husserl's works are quoted with the following abbreviations: CM = Cartesiani.~he Meditationen, Husserliana Bd. I, hrsg. v. S. Strasser (Den Haag, 195o); Carte- s/an M~, trans. D. Cairns (Dordrecht, 196o ) SW = Husserl, Shorter Works, ed. P. McCormick and F. Elliston (Notre Dame, 198a) IZ = Zur Phttnomenologie des inneren Zeilheun~tseim (z 893-z 917), Husserliana Bd. X, hrsg. v. R. Boehm (Den Haag, 1966 ) Ideen I = ldeen zu einer reinen Ph~nomenologie und ph~nomenologischen Philosophic, Husserliana Bd. III, hrsg. v. W. Biemel (Den Haag, t95o); Ideas I, trans. F. Kersten (The Hague, Boston, Lancaster, s983) ldeen// = ld., Hussefliana Bd. IV, hrsg. v. M. Biemel (Den Haag, 1952); Ideas I1, trans. R. Rojcewicz and A. Schuwer (Dordrecht, Boston, London, x 989) FTL = Forma/e und transzendenta~ Log/k, Husserliana Bd. XVII, hrsg. v. P. Janssen (Den Haag, t974) Kr/sh = Kr/s/s der europ~/schen W/ssen~haften, Husserliana Bd. VI, hrsg. v. W. Biemel (Den Haag, 1954) I wish to express my gratitude to Pierre Kerszberg and Alessandra Fussi for their helpful com- ments on an earlier draft of the paper, and to Graham Harman for checking the final version of my English text. [645] 646 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 32:4 OCTOBER 1994 some historical antecedents, in particular Aristotle, of Husserl's theory of abid- ing properties which, as far as I can see, have not been pointed out before. Husserl's Entwicklungsgeschichte on the topic of the pure ego has already been the object of important scholarly works, of which Kern's 1964 Husserl und Kant seems to me the best example. But what the secondary literature does not do is develop thematically the ambiguities of Husserl's definitions of consciousness and temporality in a unitary and comprehensive way. While I follow the lead of Berger, Broekman, Kern, Marbach,' and others, I find that their work does not sufficiently stress the difficulties at the core ofintentionality and reflective time- consciousness. Therefore, although section 2 is a necessary presupposition for drawing some critical conclusions in the final two sections, it does not exhaust my theme. After clarifying the peculiarity of the notions of essence, intuition, tran- scendental and apriori, as well as their irl:educibility to a Kantian meaning, I turn to the "de facto transcendental ego" resulting from eidetic variation (section 3) in order to introduce an examination of temporality. The difficul- ties in the twofold requirement, namely, that consciousness be the identical subject of its Erlebnisse and be synthetically unified in time, concern the unity, primacy, and mutual relation of time and consciousness in the constitution of our experience. They have been heady pointed out by Ricoeur in his commen- tary on the Cartesian Meditations. But what I want to argue in section 4, going beyond Ricoeur's text, is that the tension between temporally constituted and constitutive consciousness in the ego's reflection on its own retentions and protensions does not simply make the question of time ambiguous, but has crucial and problematic bearings on the very definition of consciousness as intentionality. In this respect... -/- . (shrink)
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  24. Lorraine Viscardi-Murray (1985). The Constitution of the Alter Ego in Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology. Research in Phenomenology 15 (1):177-191.score: 18.0
    This paper explores Husserl's phenomenological description of the constitution of the alter ego within the sphere of transcendental subjectivity. It is important at the start to (...)point out that the Other plays a crucial role in securing the intersubjective nature of the experienced world. Although Husserl goes on in the "Fifth Cartesian Meditation" to consider the constitution of an objective world common to all subjects and the establishment of a community of monads, my primary focus in this paper will be the examination of the initial steps whereby the sense, "other ego," is constituted by the transcendental ego. My main task, then, will be to examine the reduction to the sphere of ownness, the appresentative transfer of sense from ego to alter ego, and the criterion of harmonious behavior. My primary criticisms will center around certain difficulties inherent in the attempt to uncover a primordial sphere of ownness and problems that arise from a shift in concern from the life-world (everyday) attitude to the attitude following the performance of the epoché. Part I of the paper will consist of a general discussion of Husserl's phenomenological project, Part II will be a detailed study of the alter ego, and Part III a general statement of problems and objections. (shrink)
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  25. April Capili (2011). The Created Ego in Levinas' Totality and Infinity. Sophia 50 (4):677-692.score: 18.0
    There are two seemingly opposed descriptions of the subject in Totality and Infinity : the separate and autonomous I and the self that is ready to respond to (...) the Others suffering and need. This paper points out that there is in fact another way Levinas speaks of the subject, which reinforces and reconciles the other two accounts. Throughout his first major work, Levinas explains how the ego is allowed to emerge as such by the Other who constantly confronts it. At certain points in that work Levinas comes to describe the self as a creature given to itself by another. The notion of the created ego allows for both freedom and responsibility as Levinas understands the creature as capable of thinking critically, becoming an independent individual, and turning to the Other in responsibility. (shrink)
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  26. Simon Glynn (2008). From the Delusion to the Dissolution of the Ego. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 18:35-48.score: 18.0
    Certainly many inWesternphilosophy and psychology have conceived of the human subject in the Cartesian or neo-Cartesian tradition, as a self subsisting, self identical, monadic (...)consciousness or Ego, which is to say as an essentially unchanging, substantial subject, initially isolated or separate from the world and others. On the other hand Buddhist, Taoist, Hindu and othernon-Westerntraditions, adopting a more holistic approach, have argued that such a reified,atomistic and hypostatized conception of the self is illusory. However, suggesting that from at least since the time of Hume, and later, in Hegel, there has been an alternativeWesternview of consciousness, self-consciousness and identity, the development of which can be traced through the Phenomenology, Existentialism and Poststructuralism of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Derrida and others, the paper attempts to show how this evolving view may now contribute to a sophisticated and nuanced understanding and confirmation of the wisdom ofnon-Westernconceptions. (shrink)
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  27. Jean-Luc Marion (1987). L'Ego Et le Dasein Heidegger Et laDestructionde Descartes Dans "Sein Und Zeit". Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 92 (1):25 - 53.score: 18.0
    Descartes ne joue pas, dans la pensée de Heidegger, un rôle limité à l'interprétation de l'histoire de la philosophie. Lorsque Sein und Zeit entreprend de déterminer (...) le mode d'être propre et irréductible du Dasein, Heidegger doit entrer en confrontation avec certes Husserl, mais surtout, par-delà la « conscience » husserlienne, avec Descartes lui-même. Car l'ennemi mortel du Dasein, cest l'ego du cogito. Dans quelle mesure cette rivalité n'induit-elle pas aussi une similitude? Die Rolle, die Descartes in dem Denken von Heidegger spielt, darf nicht in dem Feld seiner Deutung der Geschichte der Philosophie eng begrenztwerden. Denn, als Sein und Zeit eine Bestimmung der eigentümlicheigentlichen Seinsweise des Daseins hervorzubringen unternimmt, setzt die « Destruktion der Geschichte der Ontologie » eine Auseinanderstzung nicht nur mit Husserl, sondern auch, über Husserl hinaus, gerade mit Descartes vor. Der Todfeind des Daseins ist das ego, das aus dem cogito stammt. Inwiefern aber diese ständige Gegenüberstellung eine tiefe Nachahmung hinweise ? (shrink)
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  28. Adrian Mirvish (2002). Sartre on the Ego, Friendship and Conflict. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (2):185-205.score: 18.0
    In both Being and Nothingness and the Notebooks for an Ethics we are told how one needs the Ego to get along in the everyday world, but (...)
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  29. Brian Harding (2005). Epoché, the Transcendental Ego, and Intersubjectivity in Husserl's Phenomenology. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:141-156.score: 18.0
    This essay is concerned with defending Husserl against the criticism that he is insuffi ciently attentive to intersubjectivity. It has two moments; the fi rst articulates what (...)
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  30. Stephen Priest (2000). The Subject in Question: Sartre's Critique of Husserl in the Transcendence of the Ego. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Subject in Question provides a fascinating insight into a debate between two of the twentieth century's most famous philosophers over the key notions of conscious (...)experience and the self. Edmund Husserl, the father of phenomenology, argued that the unity of one's own consciousness depends on the "transcendental ego," an irreducible, essential self not available to ordinary consciousness. But in The Transcendence of the Ego , Jean-Paul Sartre launched a sustained attack on Husserl's doctrine and argued that the self is instead a construct, a product of one's self-image in the eyes of others. In this first book-length commentary on Sartre's influential work, Stephen Priest explores Sartre's hostility to any essentialist conception of the self and sheds new light on the debates over consciousness, the legacy of Descartes and Kant, the nature of selfhood and personal identity, and the development of the phenomenological tradition. (shrink)
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  31. Liu Zhe (2007). Sartre on Kant in the Transcendence of the Ego. Idealistic Studies 37 (1):67-76.score: 18.0
    Sartres relation to Kant in his essay The Transcendence of The Ego (TE) remains unexplained. In the last two decades, attention has increasingly beenfocused on TE (...)for two main reasons. On the one hand, this essay provides an early formulation of a fundamental insight leading to Sartres masterpiece, Being and Nothingness. On the other hand, Sartres critical reflections on consciousness and self-consciousness remains relevant for our contemporary philosophical thinking. In TE, Sartres main goal is apparently to criticize Kants transcendental idealism and thereby establish his own thesis about the spontaneity of consciousness. Therefore, an explication and evaluation of Sartres critical reading of Kant is crucial to make sense of his own position. Though there has been attention in the discussion to TE, Sartres criticism of the Kant has not yet been adequately analyzed and well understood. This paper will focus on crucial elements in Sartres rejection of Kants transcendental idealism. (shrink)
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  32. Ashok K. Gangadean (2006). A Planetary Crisis of Consciousness: The End of Ego-Based Cultures and Our Dimensional Shift Toward a Sustainable Global Civilization. World Futures 62 (6):441 – 454.score: 18.0
    This essay presents central themes from my forthcoming book, The Awakening of the Global Mind. This book seeks to open a new frontier of Global Consciousness that (...)
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  33. Jean-Luc Marion (2007). On the Ego and on God: Further Cartesian Questions. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    This book highlights the same topics in the philosophy of Descartes.In Part I (On the Ego), Marion explores the alterity of the Cartesian ego, arguing that (...)it ... (shrink)
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  34. Robert Welsh Jordan, Being and Time: Some Aspects of the Ego's Involvement in His Mental Life.score: 18.0
    The most obvious cases of ego-involvement in conscious life are those which Husserl calls conscious acts or cogitationes.[2] They are the most obvious cases because they (...) are the ones in which the ego explicitly involves himself in some way ; they exhibit the character of being engaged in by the ego or having been engaged in by him. This ego-quality or character belongs demonstrably to every conscious process in which the ego engages or lives. In the ego's conscious life, the life to which his, her, or its acts belong, there also occur mental or intentive processes in which the ego does not or did not engage, and these Husserl calls passive or non-actional processes as contrasted with the active or actional processes characterized by egoengagement. (shrink)
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  35. Lester E. Krueger (1998). The Ego has Landed! The .05 Level of Statistical Significance is Soft (Fisher) Rather Than Hard (Neyman/Pearson). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):207-208.score: 18.0
    Chow pays lip service (but not much more!) to Type I errors and thus opts for a hard (all-or-none) .05 level of significance (Superego of Neyman (...)/Pearson theory; Gigerenzer 1993). Most working scientists disregard Type I errors and thus utilize a soft .05 level (Ego of Fisher; Gigerenzer 1993), which lets them report gradations of significance (e.g., p. (shrink)
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  36. James R. Mensch (2009). The Phenomenological Status of the Ego. Idealistic Studies 39 (1/3):1-9.score: 18.0
    For phenomenology, the study of appearances and the ways they come together to present a world, the question of the ego presents special difficulties. The ego, itself, (...)
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  37. G. Roberto Burgio (1990). TheBiological Ego”. From Garrod'sChemical Individualityto Burnet'sSelf”. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (2).score: 18.0
    Starting from the conceptual premises of Garrod, who as long ago as 1902 spoke of chemical individuality, and of Burnet (1949), who recognized as self one's (...)own molecular antigenic structures (as opposed to the antigenic alien: the non- self), the discovery and understanding of HLA antigens and of their extraordinarily individual and differentiated polymorphisms have gained universal recognition. Transplant medicine has now dramatically stressed, within man's knowledge of himself, the characteristic of his biological uniqueness. Today man, having become aware of being a biological antigenic-molecular individuality which is unique and different from that of all of his fellow men (except for monozygotic twins), can therefore easily consider himself a true biological Ego. (shrink)
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  38. Todd Gooch (2006). Max Stirner and the Apotheosis of the Corporeal Ego. The Owl of Minerva 37 (2):159-190.score: 18.0
    This paper clarifies Stirners relationship to his Left Hegelian contemporaries, Ludwig Feuerbch and Bruno Bauer, by showing how, in The Ego and Its Own, Stirner sought (...)to exploit a fundamental contradiction that he perceived in the humanisitc atheism of Feuerbach and Bauer, and thereby to complete the critique of religious consciousness initiated by them. After having reconstructed Stirners position in relation to those of his contemporaries, the paper goes on to identify a significant weakness in it, and to identify resources in Feuerbachs program for a future philosophy that might be enlisted in response to Stirner. The author argues that the central claim underlying Stirners criticism of Feuerbach involves a misconception of Feuerbachs notion of the Gattungswesen or species-essence. Furthermore, Stirners unmitigated epistemological relativism is ultimately incompatible with his materialist ontology. (shrink)
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  39. Paul Moyaert (2013). The Death Drive and the Nucleus of the Ego: An Introduction to Freudian Metaphysics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):94-119.score: 18.0
    Bergson argues in his Creative Evolution that life has to be defined as an élan vital, that is, as a driving force that presses forward incessantly, overcoming (...)
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  40. Valeria Ivanova Petkova, Mehrnoush Khoshnevis & H. Henrik Ehrsson (2011). The Perspective Matters! Multisensory Integration in Ego-Centric Reference Frames Determines Full-Body Ownership. Frontiers in Psychology 2:35-35.score: 18.0
    Recent advances in experimental science have made it possible to investigate the perceptual processes involved in generating a sense of owning an entire body. This is achieved (...)
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  41. Robert E. Powell, Don C. Locke & Norman A. Sprinthall (1991). Female Offenders and Their Guards: a Programme to Promote Moral and Ego Development of Both Groups. Journal of Moral Education 20 (2):191-203.score: 18.0
    Abstract The study was designed as a test of an especially constructed series of dilemma discussion methods for an experimental group of female offenders and their guards. (...)
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  42. Marco Antonio Valentim (2013). O ego e o outro: sobre a crítica de Husserl ao cogito cartesiano. Discurso 39 (39):223-260.score: 18.0
    O ego e o outro: sobre a crítica de Husserl ao cogito cartesiano.
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  43. Jenny Barnes (2003). Phenomenological Intentionality Meets an Ego-Less State. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 3 (1).score: 18.0
    When using the phenomenological method, one aims to capture the essential structures of lived experiences. It has been my experience that phenomenology does this well, when researching (...)
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  44. Thomas Edelson (1990). Does Artificial Intellgence Require Artificial Ego? Journal of Philosophical Research 15:251-262.score: 18.0
    John Haugeland, in Artiftcial Intelligence: The Very Idea, predicts that it will not be possible to create systems whieh understand discourse about people unless those systems share (...)
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  45. Roland Huesca (2013). « Faire le texte, c'est faire la théorie ». Fragments d'ego-histoire. le Portique 30 (30).score: 18.0
    Dans un essai dego-histoire, lauteur sinterroge sur la manière dont peuvent interagir lintelligibilité narrative et lintelligibilité explicative. Car loin dêtre acces­soire, l (...)acte décrire ne se borne pas à donner un habillage linguistique venant accoutrer une intelligence du passé déjà constituée avant de sencrer dans une forme littéraire. Lécrit participe activement à la valeur cognitive dun travail. Si dans son déploiement, la narration doit assumer un style et une singularité, elle reste surtout un instrument de pensée. (shrink)
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  46. Georges J. D. Moyal (2001). The Investiture of Ego Sum as a Metaphysical Principle. Studia Leibnitiana 33 (2):224 - 229.score: 18.0
    Le seul fait qu'il surgisse après que tout a été révoqué en doute ne suffit pas à faire du cogito-plus précisément, de ego sum - un (...)principe métaphysique, une vérité première: la chose doit être démontrée. Or cette démonstration est bien , dans la II e Méditation. Elle se fait en deux temps: y participent (a) l'expérience du morceau de cire et (b) le bref recours à l'imagination (AT VII, 27-28; IX/1, 21-22) par lequel Descartes vise à déterminer s'il est davantage qu'une res cogitans. Ainsi s'explique la rémanence dans le texte de cette tentative que Descartes qualifie d' «erreur», et qui aura pu paraître redondante à ses lecteurs. (shrink)
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  47. A. H. Almaas (1986/2000). The Void: Inner Spaciousness and Ego Structure. Shambhala.score: 18.0
    In this book Almaas brings together concepts and experiences drawn from contemporary object relations theory, Freudian-based ego psychology, case studies from his own spiritual practice, and (...)teaching from the highest levels of Buddhist and other Eastern practices. He challenges us to look not only at the personality and the content of the mind, but also at the underlying nature of the mind itself. (shrink)
     
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  48. Danuta Chmielewska-Banaszak (2010). Wiedza milcząca w nauce. Koncepcja M. Polany'ego. Zagadnienia Naukoznawstwa 46 (1(183)):13-26.score: 18.0
    Prezentacja koncepcji wiedzy milczącej Michaela Polanyiego poprzedzona jest krótkimz koniecznościopisem złożonej teorii nauki i poznania, której koncepcja wiedzy milczącej jest zaledwie fragmentem. Dalsze części (...) artykułu poświęcone rekonstrukcji poglądów Polanyiego na wiedzę milczącą i jej rolę w nauce. W artykule podjęta została też próba dookreślenia wiedzy milczącej w odwołaniu do literatury przedmiotu. (shrink)
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  49. U. May-Tolzmann (1990). Ego and Narcissism Theory Between 1914 and 1922 as It Appears in the International Journal of Medical Psychoanalysis. Psyche 44 (8):689-723.score: 18.0
    The publication of Freud's essay on narcissism in 1914 set off a discussion about the psychoanalytic concepts of the ego and of narcissism. The author reviews (...)this discussion by reference to articles appearing in the Int. Z. ärztl. Psa. between 1914 and 1922. She highlights the theoretical and technical modifications corresponding to this discussion and demonstrates that apparently modern theories of the ego and of narcissism have their roots largely in that period. (shrink)
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  50. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Transcendence of the Ego: A Sketch for a Phenomenological Description. Routledge.score: 18.0
    First published in France in 1936 as a journal article, The Transcendence of the Ego was one of Jean-Paul Sartre's earliest philosophical publications. When it appeared (...), Sartre was still largely unknown, working as a school teacher in provincial France and struggling to find a publisher for his most famous fictional work, Nausea . The Transcendence of the Ego is the outcome of Sartre's intense engagement with the philosophy of Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology. Here, as in many subsequent writings, Sartre embraces Husserl's vision of phenomenology as the proper method for philosophy. But he argues that Husserl's conception of the self as an inner entity, 'behind' conscious experience is mistaken and phenomenologically unfounded. The Transcendence of the Ego offers a brilliant diagnosis of where Husserl went wrong, and a radical alternative account of the self as a product of consciousness, situated in the world. This essay introduces many of the themes central to Sartre's major work, Being and Nothingness : the nature of consciousness, the problem of self-knowledge, other minds, anguish. It demonstrates their presence and importance in Sartre's thinking from the very outset of his career. This fresh translation makes this classic work available again to students of Sartre, phenomenology, existentialism, and twentieth century philosophy. It includes a thorough and illuminating introduction by Sarah Richmond, placing Sartre's essay in its philosophical and historical context. (shrink)
     
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