Search results for 'Eleatics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. E. Raven (1948). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
  2.  52
    Sam Cowling (forthcoming). Advice for Eleatics. In Chris Daly (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophical Methods.
    Eleaticism ties ontology to causality by denying the impossibility of causally inert entities. This paper examines some challenges regarding the proper formulation and general plausibility of Eleaticism. After suggesting how Eleatics ought to respond to these challenges, I consider the prospects for extending Eleaticism from ontology to ideology by requiring all primitive ideology to be causal in nature. Surprisingly enough, the resulting view delivers an eternalist and possibilist metaphysical picture in the neighborhood of Lewisian modal realism.
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  3. Paul Benacerraf (1962). Tasks, Super-Tasks, and the Modern Eleatics. Journal of Philosophy 59 (24):765-784.
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  4.  8
    William A. Gerhard (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. New Scholasticism 24 (3):335-336.
  5. Montgomery Furth (1991). A “Philosophical Hero”? Anaxagoras and the Eleatics. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9:95-129.
     
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  6.  4
    John F. Callahan (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):755-758.
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  7.  1
    A. R. Lacey (1965). The Eleatics and Aristotle on Some Problems of Change. Journal of the History of Ideas 26 (4):451.
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  8.  1
    John F. Callahan (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics: An Account of the Interaction Between the Two Opposed Schools During the Fifth and Early Fourth Centuries B.C. [REVIEW] Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):755-758.
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  9.  1
    David J. Furley (1994). 21 The Atomists' Reply to the Eleatics. In Alexander P. D. Mourelatos (ed.), The Pre-Socratics: A Collection of Critical Essays. Princeton University Press 504-526.
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  10.  1
    Benson Mates (1949). Raven, Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 43:59.
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  11.  2
    J. Tate (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics J. E. Raven: Pythagoreans and Eleatics. An Account of the Interaction Between the Two Opposed Schools During the Fifth and Early Fourth Centuries B.C. Pp. Viii+196. Cambridge: University Press, 1948. Cloth, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (3-4):109-111.
  12.  5
    Daniel E. Gershenson & Daniel A. Greenberg (1962). Aristotle Confronts the Eleatics: Two Arguments on 'The One'. Phronesis 7 (2):137 - 151.
  13.  6
    T. Whittaker (1924). A Note on the Eleatics. Mind 33 (132):428-432.
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  14.  3
    G. B. Kerferd (1952). The Eleatics Jean Zafiropulo: L'École Éléate. Parménide, Zénon, Mélissos. (Collection d'Études Anciennes.) Pp. 304. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1950. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (02):76-77.
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  15.  2
    G. B. Kerferd (1978). Presocratic Studies R. E. Allen, David J. Furley: Studies in Presocratic Philosophy, Vol. Ii: Eleatics and Pluralists. Pp. Viii + 440. London: Routledge, 1975. Cloth, £7·95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):79-80.
  16. Daniel A. Greenberg & Daniel E. Gershenson (1962). Aristotle Confronts the Eleatics: Two Arguments on 'The One' 1. Phronesis 7 (1):137-151.
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  17. G. B. Kerferd (1952). The Eleatics. The Classical Review 2 (02):76-.
  18. A. C. Lloyd (1950). RAVEN, J. E. - Pythagoreans and Eleatics. [REVIEW] Mind 59:117.
     
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  19. Alexander Nehamas (1977). Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. Volume II: Eleatics and Pluralists by R. E. Allen; David J. Furley. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 68:470-471.
     
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  20. Patricia Curd (2004). The Legacy of Parmenides: Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought. Parmenides Publishing.
    Parmenides of Elea was the most important and influential philosopher before Plato. He rejected as impossible the scientific inquiry practiced by the earlier Presocratic philosophers and held that generation, destruction, and change are unreal and that only one thing exists. In this book, Patricia Curd argues that Parmenides sought to reform rather than to reject scientific inquiry, and she offers a more coherent account of his influence on later philosophers._ _The Legacy of Parmenides_ examines Parmenides' arguments, considering his connection to (...)
     
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  21. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). Acosmism or Weak Individuals?: Hegel, Spinoza, and the Reality of the Finite. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 77-92.
    Like many of his contemporaries, Hegel considered Spinoza a modern reviver of ancient Eleatic monism, in whose system “all determinate content is swallowed up as radically null and void”. This characterization of Spinoza as denying the reality of the world of finite things had a lasting influence on the perception of Spinoza in the two centuries that followed. In this article, I take these claims of Hegel to task and evaluate their validity. Although Hegel’s official argument for the unreality of (...)
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  22.  33
    John Anderson Palmer (2009). Parmenides and Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    John Palmer develops and defends a modal interpretation of Parmenides, according to which he was the first philosopher to distinguish in a rigorous manner the fundamental modalities of necessary being, necessary non-being or impossibility, and non-necessary or contingent being. This book accordingly reconsiders his place in the historical development of Presocratic philosophy in light of this new interpretation. Careful treatment of Parmenides' specification of the ways of inquiry that define his metaphysical and epistemological outlook paves the way for detailed (...)
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  23. Yitzhak Melamed (2012). The Sirens of Elea: Rationalism, Monism and Idealism in Spinoza. In Antonia Lolordo & Duncan Stewart (eds.), Debates in Early Modern Philosophy. Blackwell
    The main thesis of Michael Della Rocca’s outstanding Spinoza book (Della Rocca 2008a) is that at the very center of Spinoza’s philosophy stands the Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR): the stipulation that everything must be explainable or, in other words, the rejection of any brute facts. Della Rocca rightly ascribes to Spinoza a strong version of the PSR. It is not only that the actual existence and features of all things must be explicable, but even the inexistence – as well (...)
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  24. Pilo Albertelli (1940). Gli Eleati: Testimonianze E Frammenti. Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):51-51.
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  25. Luisa Breglia & Marcello Lupi (eds.) (2005). Da Elea a Samo: Filosofi E Politici di Fronte All'impero Ateniese: Atti Del Convegno di Studi, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, 4-5 Giugno 2003. [REVIEW] Arte Tipografica.
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  26. Nestor-Luis Cordero (2004). By Being, It Is: The Thesis of Parmenides. Parmenides Pub..
    The adventure of philosophy began in Greece, where it was gradually developed by the ancient thinkers as a special kind of knowledge by which to explain the totality of things. In fact, the Greek language has always used the word onta , "beings," to refer to things. At the end of the sixth century BCE, Parmenides wrote a poem to affirm his fundamental thesis upon which all philosophical systems should be based: that there are beings. In By Being, It Is (...)
     
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  27. Nestor-Luis Cordero, Livio Rossetti & Flavia Marcacci (eds.) (2008). Eleatica 2006: Parmenide Scienziato? Academia Verlag.
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  28. Bruno Liebrucks (1949). Platons Entwicklung Zur Dialektik Untersuchungen Zum Problem des Eleatismus. V. Klostermann.
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  29. Johannes Hubertus Mathias Marie Loenen (1959). Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. Assen, Netherlands, Royal Vangorcum Ltd..
  30. Gerold Prauss (1966). Platon Und der Logische Eleatismus. Walter de Gruyter.
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  31. José Solana Dueso (2006). De Logos a Physis: Estudio Sobre El Poema de Parménides. Mira Editores.
    Parménides es uno de los pensadores más influyentes de la filosofía occidental. El presente libro ofrece una hipótesis hermenéutica que se puede resumir en dos afirmaciones esenciales: primera, Parménides, como todos los pensadores de su tiempo, era ante todo un físico o fisiólogo (como los denominó Aristóteles), cuyas inquietudes y aportaciones se expresan en la segunda parte de su poema Sobre la naturaleza. Esa parte, escasamente representada en los fragmentos conservados, exponía una teoría original que se caracterizaba por defender una (...)
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  32. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This book is comprised of two parts. The first four chapters concentrate on the metaphysics of substance, while the last two address Spinoza’s metaphysics of thought. These two parts are closely connected, and several crucial claims in the last two chapters rely on arguments advanced in the first four. I intentionally use the term ‘metaphysics of thought’ rather than ‘philosophy of mind’ for two main reasons. First, the domain of thought in Spinoza is far more extensive than anything associated with (...)
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  33.  5
    Emily Thomas (2015). In Defense of Real Cartesian Motion: A Reply to Lennon. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):747-762.
    thomas lennon has argued for an innovative “Eleatic” reading of Descartes. At its heart is the thesis that Descartes is a phenomenalist about motions; with this in place, Lennon goes on to argue that Descartes is also a phenomenalist about individual material bodies. Conjuring up the ghosts of Eleatics such as Parmenides, Lennon describes a Cartesian material world in which moving, individual bodies are appearances, not realities. This paper takes issue with Lennon’s thesis that Cartesian motion is phenomenal.Section 2 (...)
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  34.  8
    Seweryn Blandzi (2012). Gorgiasza meontologia vs. nihilizm. ARGUMENT 2 (2):245 - 263.
    Meontology of Gorgias vs. Nihilism. The purpose of this paper is to challenge Gorgias’ image of a “nihilist existentialist”. The original thesis ouden estin, too frequently rendered as „nothing exists”, thus reducing the verb “to be” to denote “bare” existence, and ouden to denote “nothingness”. On close inspection, it turns out that, in Gorgias, neither do we have a negation of reality nor an affirmative treatment of the word “nothingness”.Therefore, ouden” should not be understood as a negation of all reality (...)
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  35.  8
    Elías Capriles (2009). Beyond Mind III: Further Steps to a Metatranspersonal Philosophy and Psychology. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 28 (2):1-145.
    This paper gives continuity to the criticism, undertaken in two papers previously published in this journal, of transpersonal systems that fail to discriminate between nirvanic, samsaric, and neithernirvanic-nor-samsaric transpersonal states, and which present the absolute sanity of Awakening as a dualistic, conceptually-tainted condition. It also gives continuity to the denunciation of the false disjunction between ontogenically ascending and descending paths, while showing the truly significant disjunction to be between existentially ascending and metaexistentially descending paths. However, whereas in the preceding paper (...)
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  36.  8
    J. M. Rist (1970). Parmenides and Plato's Parmenides. Classical Quarterly 20 (02):221-.
    In two of his dialogues especially, the Sophist and the Parmenides, Plato concerns himself at length with problems presented by the Eleatics. Despite difficulties in the interpretation of individual passages, the Sophist has in general proved the less difficult to understand, and since some of the problems at issue in the two works indicate the same or similar preoccupations in Plato's mind, it is worth considering how far an interpretation of the ‘easier’ dialogue can be used to forward an (...)
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  37.  1
    Jan Bigaj (2012). Rola negacji w opisie świata według arystotelesowskiej Metafizyki. ARGUMENT 2 (2):265 - 291.
    The Role of Negation in the Description of the World According to Aristote’s Metaphysics. The notions of ‘being’ and ‘non-being’ have entered philosophical language, forming the basis of ontology and meontology, as the counterparts of the Greek expressions to on and to me on (nominalised forms, affirmative and negative, of the participle of the verb einai). Originally, however, these expressions did not have any objectifying meaning, but played the role of meta-language names, representing the copula einai in all its forms, (...)
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  38. A. E. Garvie (1931). The Constant and the Contingent in Human Thought and Life. Philosophy 6 (24):485 - 490.
    The business of philosophy is “to think things together,” so far as the reality of things and the capacity of thought allow. That reality presents many contrasts, physical, ethical, metaphysical, light and darkness, life and death, good and evil, right and wrong, the One and the many, the Infinite and the finite, the Eternal and the temporal, and what we mention as last, but not least, for our immediate purpose, Being and Becoming, the Constant and the Contingent. The contrasts need (...)
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  39. John R. Catan (ed.) (1987). A History of Ancient Philosophy I: From the Origins to Socrates. State University of New York Press.
    Beginning with the origins of Western philosophy, the profound creation of the Hellenic genius, Reale presents an appreciation of the Naturalists, the Sophists, Socrates, and the Minor Socratics. Special attention is paid to the Eleatics because their problems decisively mark Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy. Interpretation of the Sophists benefits from the recent reevaluation of their thought. Socrates himself would be inconceivable without the Sophists since he is one of them. Socrates is given major prominence. Plato, Aristotle, and all of (...)
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  40. David J. Furley (1970). Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. New York,Humanities Press.
  41. A. A. Long (ed.) (1999). The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    The Western tradition of philosophy began in Greece with a cluster of thinkers often called the Presocratics, whose influence has been incalculable. They include the early Ionian cosmologists, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, the Eleatics , Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the atomists and the sophists. All these thinkers are discussed in this 1999 volume both as individuals and collectively in chapters on rational theology, epistemology, psychology, rhetoric and relativism, justice, and poetics. A chapter on causality extends the focus to include historians and medical writers.
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  42. Russell Marcus (2015). The Eleatic and the Indispensabilist. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 30 (3):415-429.
    The debate over whether we should believe that mathematical objects exist quickly leads to the question of how to determine what we should believe to exist. Indispensabilists claim that we should believe in the existence of mathematical objects because of their ineliminable roles in scientific theory. Eleatics argue that only objects with causal properties exist. Mark Colyvan’s recent defenses of Quine’s indispensability argument present an intriguing attempt to provide reasons to favor the indispensabilist’s criterion against some contemporary eleatics. (...)
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  43.  6
    Zbigniew Nerczuk (2002). Sztuka a prawda. Problem sztuki w dyskusji między Gorgiaszem a Platonem (Techne and Truth. The problem of techne in the dispute between Gorgias and Plato). Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
    Techne and Truth. The problem of techne in the dispute between Gorgias and Plato -/- The source of the problem matter of the book is the Plato’s dialogue „Gorgias”. One of the main subjects of the discussion carried out in this multi-aspect work is the issue of the art of rhetoric. In the dialogue the contemporary form of the art of rhetoric, represented by Gorgias, Polos and Callicles, is confronted with Plato’s proposal of rhetoric and concept of art (...)
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  44. Samuel Scolnicov (2003). Plato's Parmenides. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Of all Plato’s dialogues, the _Parmenides_ is notoriously the most difficult to interpret. Scholars of all periods have disagreed about its aims and subject matter. The interpretations have ranged from reading the dialogue as an introduction to the whole of Platonic metaphysics to seeing it as a collection of sophisticated tricks, or even as an elaborate joke. This work presents an illuminating new translation of the dialogue together with an extensive introduction and running commentary, giving a unified explanation of the (...)
     
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