Search results for 'Eleatics' (try it on Scholar)

87 found
Sort by:
  1. J. E. Raven (1948). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.score: 15.0
  2. Paul Benacerraf (1962). Tasks, Super-Tasks, and the Modern Eleatics. Journal of Philosophy 59 (24):765-784.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel E. Gershenson & Daniel A. Greenberg (1962). Aristotle Confronts the Eleatics: Two Arguments on 'The One'. Phronesis 7 (2):137 - 151.score: 9.0
  4. T. Whittaker (1924). A Note on the Eleatics. Mind 33 (132):428-432.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. G. B. Kerferd (1952). The Eleatics Jean Zafiropulo: L'École Éléate. Parménide, Zénon, Mélissos. (Collection d'Études Anciennes.) Pp. 304. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1950. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (02):76-77.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. J. Tate (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics J. E. Raven: Pythagoreans and Eleatics. An Account of the Interaction Between the Two Opposed Schools During the Fifth and Early Fourth Centuries B.C. Pp. Viii+196. Cambridge: University Press, 1948. Cloth, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (3-4):109-111.score: 9.0
  7. John F. Callahan (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Thought 25 (4):755-758.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. William A. Gerhard (1950). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. New Scholasticism 24 (3):335-336.score: 9.0
  9. G. B. Kerferd (1978). Presocratic Studies R. E. Allen, David J. Furley: Studies in Presocratic Philosophy, Vol. Ii: Eleatics and Pluralists. Pp. Viii + 440. London: Routledge, 1975. Cloth, £7·95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):79-80.score: 9.0
  10. Montgomery Furth (1991). A “Philosophical Hero”? Anaxagoras and the Eleatics. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9:95-129.score: 9.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. G. B. Kerferd (1952). The Eleatics. The Classical Review 2 (02):76-.score: 9.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). Acosmism or Weak Individuals?: Hegel, Spinoza, and the Reality of the Finite. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 77-92.score: 7.0
    Like many of his contemporaries, Hegel considered Spinoza a modern reviver of ancient Eleatic monism, in whose system “all determinate content is swallowed up as radically null and void”. This characterization of Spinoza as denying the reality of the world of finite things had a lasting influence on the perception of Spinoza in the two centuries that followed. In this article, I take these claims of Hegel to task and evaluate their validity. Although Hegel’s official argument for the unreality of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Yitzhak Melamed (2012). The Sirens of Elea: Rationalism, Monism and Idealism in Spinoza. In Antonia Lolordo & Duncan Stewart (eds.), Debates in Early Modern Philosophy. Blackwell.score: 6.0
    The main thesis of Michael Della Rocca’s outstanding Spinoza book (Della Rocca 2008a) is that at the very center of Spinoza’s philosophy stands the Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR): the stipulation that everything must be explainable or, in other words, the rejection of any brute facts. Della Rocca rightly ascribes to Spinoza a strong version of the PSR. It is not only that the actual existence and features of all things must be explicable, but even the inexistence – as well (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John Anderson Palmer (2009). Parmenides and Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    John Palmer develops and defends a modal interpretation of Parmenides, according to which he was the first philosopher to distinguish in a rigorous manner the fundamental modalities of necessary being, necessary non-being or impossibility, and non-necessary or contingent being. This book accordingly reconsiders his place in the historical development of Presocratic philosophy in light of this new interpretation. Careful treatment of Parmenides' specification of the ways of inquiry that define his metaphysical and epistemological outlook paves the way for detailed analyses (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Luisa Breglia & Marcello Lupi (eds.) (2005). Da Elea a Samo: Filosofi E Politici di Fronte All'impero Ateniese: Atti Del Convegno di Studi, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, 4-5 Giugno 2003. [REVIEW] Arte Tipografica.score: 6.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Nestor-Luis Cordero (2004). By Being, It Is: The Thesis of Parmenides. Parmenides Pub..score: 6.0
    The adventure of philosophy began in Greece, where it was gradually developed by the ancient thinkers as a special kind of knowledge by which to explain the totality of things. In fact, the Greek language has always used the word onta , "beings," to refer to things. At the end of the sixth century BCE, Parmenides wrote a poem to affirm his fundamental thesis upon which all philosophical systems should be based: that there are beings. In By Being, It Is (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nestor-Luis Cordero, Livio Rossetti & Flavia Marcacci (eds.) (2008). Eleatica 2006: Parmenide Scienziato? Academia Verlag.score: 6.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Johannes Hubertus Mathias Marie Loenen (1959). Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. Assen, Netherlands, Royal Vangorcum Ltd..score: 6.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. José Solana Dueso (2006). De Logos a Physis: Estudio Sobre El Poema de Parménides. Mira Editores.score: 6.0
    Parménides es uno de los pensadores más influyentes de la filosofía occidental. El presente libro ofrece una hipótesis hermenéutica que se puede resumir en dos afirmaciones esenciales: primera, Parménides, como todos los pensadores de su tiempo, era ante todo un físico o fisiólogo (como los denominó Aristóteles), cuyas inquietudes y aportaciones se expresan en la segunda parte de su poema Sobre la naturaleza. Esa parte, escasamente representada en los fragmentos conservados, exponía una teoría original que se caracterizaba por defender una (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mark Colyvan (1998). Can the Eleatic Principle Be Justified? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):313 - 335.score: 4.0
    The Eleatic Principle or causal criterion is a causal test that entities must pass in order to gain admission to some philosophers’ ontology.1 This principle justifies belief in only those entities to which causal power can be attributed, that is, to those entities which can bring about changes in the world. The idea of such a test is rather important in modern ontology, since it is neither without intuitive appeal nor without influential supporters. Its supporters have included David Armstrong (1978, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael Rea (2001). How to Be an Eleatic Monist. Noûs 35 (s15):129-151.score: 4.0
    There is a tradition according to which Parmenides of Elea endorsed the following set of counterintuitive doctrines: (a) There exists exactly one material thing. (b) What exists does not change. (g) Nothing is generated or destroyed. (d) What exists is undivided. For convenience, I will use the label ‘Eleatic monism’ to refer to the conjunction of a–d.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2011). Why Spinoza is Not an Eleatic Monist (Or Why Diversity Exists). In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism. Palgrave.score: 3.0
    “Why did God create the World?” is one of the traditional questions of theology. In the twentieth century this question was rephrased in a secularized manner as “Why is there something rather than nothing?” While creation - at least in its traditional, temporal, sense - has little place in Spinoza’s system, a variant of the same questions puts Spinoza’s system under significant pressure. According to Spinoza, God, or the substance, has infinitely many modes. This infinity of modes follow from the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Montgomery Furth (1968). Elements of Eleatic Ontology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (2).score: 3.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Graham Oddie (1982). Armstrong on the Eleatic Principle and Abstract Entities. Philosophical Studies 41 (2):285 - 295.score: 3.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Josh Parsons (2004). The Eleatic Hangover Cure. Analysis 64 (4):364–366.score: 3.0
    It’s well known that one way to cure a hangover is by a “hair of the dog” — another alcoholic drink. The drawback of this method is that, so it would appear, it cannot be used to completely cure a hangover, since the cure simply induces a further hangover at a later time, which must in turn either be cured or suffered through.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. G. E. L. Owen (1960). Eleatic Questions. Classical Quarterly 10 (1-2):84-.score: 3.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomas M. Lennon (2007). The Eleatic Descartes. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):29-45.score: 3.0
    : Given Descartes's conception of extension, space and body, there are deep problems about how there can be any real motion. The argument here is that in fact Descartes takes motion to be only phenomenal. The paper sets out the problems generated by taking motion to be real, the solution to them found in the Cartesian texts, and an explanation of those texts in which Descartes appears on the contrary to regard motion as real.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    This book is comprised of two parts. The first four chapters concentrate on the metaphysics of substance, while the last two address Spinoza’s metaphysics of thought. These two parts are closely connected, and several crucial claims in the last two chapters rely on arguments advanced in the first four. I intentionally use the term ‘metaphysics of thought’ rather than ‘philosophy of mind’ for two main reasons. First, the domain of thought in Spinoza is far more extensive than anything associated with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jonathan Barnes (1979). Parmenides and the Eleatic One. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 61 (1):1-21.score: 3.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kenneth Neil M. Dorter, Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues.score: 3.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Eric C. Sanday (2009). Eleatic Metaphysics in Plato's Parmenides : Zeno's Puzzle of Plurality. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (3):pp. 208-226.score: 3.0
  32. Simon Prosser (2006). The Eleatic Non-Stick Frying Pan. Analysis 66 (291):187–194.score: 3.0
    A novel way of making a non-stick frying pan using a topologically open surface is described. While the article has a slight humorous element to it, it is also intended to contain some serious philosophical points concerning the nature of infinitely divisible matter and the kind of contact that must occur between objects in order for them to interact.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gustavo E. Romero (2013). From Change to Spacetime: An Eleatic Journey. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (1):139-148.score: 3.0
    I present a formal ontological theory where the basic building blocks of the world can be either things or events. In any case, the result is a Parmenidean worldview where change is not a global property. What we understand by change manifests as asymmetries in the pattern of the world-lines that constitute 4-dimensional existents. I maintain that such a view is in accord with current scientific knowledge.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Patricia Kenig Curd (1993). Eleatic Monism in Zeno and Melissus. Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):1-22.score: 3.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Scott Berman (1996). Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues. Ancient Philosophy 16 (2):487-491.score: 3.0
  36. V. Tejera (1978). Plato's Politicus, an Eleatic Sophist on Politics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1):106-125.score: 3.0
  37. Laura Grams (2012). The Eleatic Visitor's Method of Division. Apeiron 45 (2):130-156.score: 3.0
  38. R. B. B. Wardy (1988). Eleatic Pluralism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 70 (2):125-146.score: 3.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. V. Tejera (1978). Plato's Politicus: An Eleatic Sophist on Politics (Part II). Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (2):106-125.score: 3.0
  40. G. B. Kerferd (1961). Eleatic Philosophy J. H. M. M. Loenen: Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Pp. 207. Assen: Van Gorcum, 1959. Paper, Fl. 14.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (01):26-27.score: 3.0
  41. M. Schofield (1998). The Legacy of Parmenides. Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought. P Curd. The Classical Review 48 (2):347-348.score: 3.0
  42. Jacob Howland (1996). Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues. Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):646-648.score: 3.0
  43. Wallace Matson (1984). Eleatic Motions. Philosophical Inquiry 6 (3-4):184-201.score: 3.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Mitchell H. Miller (1999). The Legacy of Parmenides, Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):157-159.score: 3.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Samuel C. Wheeler (1983). Megarian Paradoxes as Eleatic Arguments. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):287-295.score: 3.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Luis Andres Bredlow (2011). Plato and Invention of the Eleatic School (Sof. 242 D). Convivium 24:25-42.score: 3.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. R. S. B. (1960). Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 14 (1):173-174.score: 3.0
  48. P. Curd (1998). Eleatic Arguments. In Jyl Gentzler (ed.), Method in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 1--28.score: 3.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Adam Drozdek (forthcoming). Eleatic Being: Finite or Infinite? Hermes.score: 3.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David J. Furley (1970). Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. New York,Humanities Press.score: 3.0
1 — 50 / 87