Search results for 'Electric power production' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Bugliarello (ed.) (1977). Science, Technology, and Modern Society: Inaugural Symposium and Lectures Following the Inauguration of George Bugliarello as First President of the Polytechnic Institute of New York, March 13-14, 1975. [REVIEW] Polytechnic Press.score: 60.0
     
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  2. J. Gaussens (1965). Choice of Optimum Size of Installations for Dual-Purpose Production of Desalted Water and Electricity, Using Nuclear Power. In. In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship. 3--407.score: 51.0
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  3. Stephen F. Bush (2014). Smart Grid: Communication-Enabled Intelligence for the Electric Power Grid. Wiley-Ieee Press.score: 48.0
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  4. Behnam Taebi (2011). The Morally Desirable Option for Nuclear Power Production. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):169-192.score: 42.0
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  5. Marc Roberts (2005). The Production of the Psychiatric Subject: Power, Knowledge and Michel Foucault. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):33-42.score: 42.0
  6. George B. Pepper (1980). Book Review:Values in the Electric Power Industry. Kenneth Sayre. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (3):462-.score: 42.0
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  7. Mohammad A. Abido (2009). Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms for Electric Power Dispatch Problem. In. In L. Magnani (ed.), Computational Intelligence. 47--82.score: 42.0
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  8. J. Ancelin, F. Cheriaux, J. P. Gaussot, P. Legaud, D. Pichot, G. Sancerni & G. Voisin (1991). Kse: Expert System Monitoring Electric Power Supplies in a Pwr Power Plant. Ai 1991 Frontiers in Innovative Computing for the Nuclear Industry Topical Meeting, Jackson Lake, Wy, Sept. 15-18, 1991 1.score: 42.0
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  9. Ross Little & Bruce Sawhill (1998). Market Feedback Replaces Regulation: Adaptation in the Electric Power Industry. Complexity 3 (4):46-50.score: 42.0
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  10. Marc Roberts rmn diphe ba student (2005). The Production of the Psychiatric Subject: Power, Knowledge and Michel Foucault. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):33–42.score: 36.0
  11. Chris Harman (2008). An Age of Transition? Economy and Society in England in the Later Middle Ages The Field and the Forge: Population, Production and Power in the Pre-Industrial West. Historical Materialism 16 (1):185-199.score: 36.0
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  12. Jong Kang Park, Yong Ki Byun & Jong Tae Kim (2006). Artificial Intelligence Applications in Power Electronics-Equivalent Electric Circuit Modeling of Differential Structures in PCB with Genetic Algorithm. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 907-913.score: 36.0
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  13. Stanley Salthe (2010). Maximum Power and Maximum Entropy Production: Finalities in Nature. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 6 (1):114-121.score: 36.0
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  14. K. D. Eason, S. D. P. Harker, R. F. Raven, J. R. Brailsford & A. D. Cross (1995). Expert or Assistant: Supporting Power Engineers in the Management of Electricity Distribution. [REVIEW] AI and Society 9 (1):91-104.score: 35.0
    A case study is presented of the development of computer-based support tools for power engineers in the electricity supply industry. The objective was to develop an expert system to support witching schedule production. A user-centred approach was followed which led the user community to conclude that a switching schedule production assistant (SSPA) was required which would leave control with the power engineer. Prototype systems were developed and evaluated in user trials which revealed that a significant and (...)
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  15. Françoise Delon & Patrick Simonetta (1998). Undecidable Wreath Products and Skew Power Series Fields. Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (1):237-246.score: 30.0
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  16. Ruth Klüser (2009). Current Challenges for Efficient Electricity Grids. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):265-271.score: 30.0
    The comprehensive liberalisation of the electricity market at the end of the last century has initiated a dynamic development. The politically determined disjunction of the network operation from generation, commerce and distribution which broke open the value added chain concerning the business organisation is to induce competition and consequently lower prices. Thus, besides a secure electricity supply, profitability, efficiency, quality and environmental aspects constitute present aims and have led to an enormous increase of complexity in the power supply. Furthermore, (...)
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  17. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 27.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  18. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Climate Change, Nuclear Economics, and Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):75-107.score: 24.0
    Merck suppressed data on harmful effects of its drug Vioxx, and Guidant suppressed data on electrical flaws in one of its heart-defibrillator models. Both cases reveal how financial conflicts of interest can skew biomedical research. Such conflicts also occur in electric-utility-related research. Attempting to show that increased atomic energy can help address climate change, some industry advocates claim nuclear power is an inexpensive way to generate low-carbon electricity. Surveying 30 recent nuclear analyses, this paper shows that industry-funded studies (...)
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  19. Arianna Ferrari & Alfred Nordmann (2010). Beyond Conversation: Some Lessons for Nanoethics. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 4 (2):171-181.score: 24.0
    One of the aims of the DEEPEN project was to deepen ethical understanding of issues related to emerging nanotechnologies through an interdisciplinary approach utilizing insights from philosophy, ethics, and the social sciences. Accordingly, part of its final report was dedicated to the question of what was accomplished with regards to this aim and what further research is required. It relates two insights: Nanotechnologies intensify the ambivalence of ongoing, long-term developments; and yet, our intuitions and received story-lines fail us as a (...)
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  20. Rohini Hensman (2011). Revisiting the Domestic-Labour Debate: An Indian Perspective. Historical Materialism 19 (3):3-28.score: 24.0
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  21. Alfred Nordmann (2010). Beyond Conversation: Some Lessons for Nanoethics. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 4 (2):171-181.score: 24.0
    One of the aims of the DEEPEN project was to deepen ethical understanding of issues related to emerging nanotechnologies through an interdisciplinary approach utilizing insights from philosophy, ethics, and the social sciences. Accordingly, part of its final report was dedicated to the question of what was accomplished with regards to this aim and what further research is required. It relates two insights: Nanotechnologies intensify the ambivalence of ongoing, long-term developments; and yet, our intuitions and received story-lines fail us as a (...)
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  22. Simon Glynn, The Three Fallacies of Pandora: The Case Against Nuclear Power.score: 23.0
    At a time when global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions pose a present and clear threat to the environment, the Nuclear Energy Industry is gearing up to provide a solution to this problem, trading upon a number of fallacies to argue that it neither makes, nor will in future make, any significant contribution to these or to other radiation-linked diseases. This paper exposes these fallacies and argues, to the contrary, that even should the industry be able to avoid all (...)
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  23. Jan Tullberg (2004). Illusions of Corporate Power:Revisiting the Relative Powers of Corporations and Governments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):325 - 333.score: 21.0
    A common opinion is that power has shifted from states to companies. This article discusses quantitative and qualitative aspects of power possessed by companies and by states. A more adequate comparison than that between company sales and gross national product is the one between company value added and GNP. Also more adequate is the comparison between the public sector and company net profit. These rival measures take down company power to about a tenth of the sales measure. (...)
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  24. Sheila Jasanoff (ed.) (2004). States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and Social Order. Routledge.score: 21.0
    In the past twenty years, the field of science and technology studies (S&TS) has made considerable progress toward illuminating the relationship between scientific knowledge and political power. These insights have not yet been synthesized or presented in a form that systematically highlights the connections between S&TS and other social sciences. This timely collection of essays by some of the leading scholars in the field attempts to fill that gap. The book develops the theme of "co-production", showing how scientific (...)
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  25. Kate Macdonald & Terry Macdonald (2010). Democracy in a Pluralist Global Order: Corporate Power and Stakeholder Representation. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (1):19-43.score: 21.0
    Whereas representative democratic mechanisms have generally been built around preexisting institutional structures of sovereign states, the global political domain lacks any firmly constitutionalized or sovereign structures that could constitute an analogous institutional backbone within a democratic global order. Instead, global public power can best be characterized as "pluralist" in structure. Some recent commentators have argued that if global democratization is to succeed at all, it must proceed along a trajectory beginning with the construction of global sovereign institutions and culminating (...)
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  26. Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.score: 21.0
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in (...)
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  27. Ellen K. Feder (2007). The Dangerous Individual('s) Mother: Biopower, Family, and the Production of Race. Hypatia 22 (2):60-78.score: 21.0
    : Even as feminist analyses have contributed in important ways to discussions of how gender is raced and race is gendered, there has been little in the way of comparative analysis of the specific mechanisms that are at work in the production of each. Feder argues that in Michel Foucault's analytics of power we find tools to understand the reproduction of whiteness as a complex interaction of distinctive expressions of power associated with these categories of difference.
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  28. Rafael Winkler (2007). Nietzsche and l'Élan Technique: Technics, Life, and the Production of Time. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (1):73-90.score: 21.0
    In this paper we examine Nietzsche’s relation to the life sciences of his time and to Darwinism in particular, arguing that his account of the will to power in terms of technics eschews three metaphysical prejudices, hylemorphism, utilitarianism, and teleological thinking. Telescoping some of Nietzsche’s pronouncements on the will to power with a Bergsonian lens, our reading of the will to power, as an operation productive of time, the future or life, offers an alternative to Heidegger’s. Rather (...)
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  29. Garry Potter (2010). Power and Knowledge: A Dialectical Contradiction. Journal of Critical Realism 9 (2):133-154.score: 21.0
    This article theorizes the inseparable relationship of power and knowledge. It argues that there is a transhistorical constant in the production and dissemination of knowledge: a dialectical contradiction within its institutional heart. The production, dissemination and, importantly, the consolidation of knowledge, is bound up with the obfuscation of this and restriction or prevention of knowledge dissemination. These latter processes are part of the concept I call structural mystification. The article explains and theoretically justifies this concept and details (...)
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  30. A. Buchanan & M. C. Kelley (2013). Biodefence and the Production of Knowledge: Rethinking the Problem. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):195-204.score: 21.0
    Next SectionBiodefence, broadly understood as efforts to prevent or mitigate the damage of a bioterrorist attack, raises a number of ethical issues, from the allocation of scarce biomedical research and public health funds, to the use of coercion in quarantine and other containment measures in the event of an outbreak. In response to the US bioterrorist attacks following September 11, significant US policy decisions were made to spur scientific enquiry in the name of biodefence. These decisions led to a number (...)
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  31. Robert A. Rhoads, Jennifer Berdan & Brit Toven-Lindsey (2013). The Open Courseware Movement in Higher Education: Unmasking Power and Raising Questions About the Movement's Democratic Potential. Educational Theory 63 (1):87-110.score: 21.0
    In this essay Robert Rhoads, Jennifer Berdan, and Brit Toven-Lindsey examine some of the key literature related to the open courseware (OCW) movement (including the emergence and expansion of massive open online courses, or MOOCs), focusing particular attention on the movement's democratic potential. The discussion is organized around three central problems, all relating in some manner or form to issues of power: the problem of epistemology, the problem of pedagogy, and the problem of hegemony. More specifically, the authors raise (...)
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  32. Roger Deacon (2002). An Analytics of Power Relations: Foucault on the History of Discipline. History of the Human Sciences 15 (1):89-117.score: 21.0
    To understand how we have become what we are requires, following Foucault, not a theory but an `analytics' which examines how technologies of power and knowledge have, since antiquity, intertwined and developed in concrete and historical frameworks. Distilling from Foucault's oeuvre as a whole a rough periodization of western political rationalities, this article shows how the processes whereby some people discipline or govern others are frequently closely connected to procedures of identity-constitution and knowledge-production. Platonic, Stoic and Christian pursuits (...)
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  33. Philip McMichael (2000). The Power of Food. Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):21-33.score: 21.0
    In the developmentalist era,industrialization has simultaneously transformedagriculture and degraded its natural and culturalbase. Food production and consumption embodies thecontradictory aspects of this transformation. Thispaper argues that the crisis of development hasgenerated two basic responses: (1) the attempt toredefine development as a global project, includingharnessing biotechnology to resolve the food securityquestion, and (2) a series of countermovementsattempting to simultaneously reassert the value oflocal, organic foods, and challenge the attempt on thepart of food corporations and national and globalinstitutions to subject the (...)
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  34. Hui Zhu, Cornelis van Kooten & Amy Sopinka (2010). The Economics Of Hydro And Wind Power In A Carbon Constrained World. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 21:145-157.score: 21.0
    To reduce CO2 emissions requires greater reliance on renewable sources of energy for generating electricity, especially adoption of large-scale wind generation. This study investigates possible approaches and/or policies that increase efficient use of renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a cost effective manner. We develop a constrained optimization model of two electricity systems to identify the impact of increasing wind generating capacity and examine how carbon prices (taxes, allowances) impact the penetration of wind power into the electricity (...)
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  35. Michael Jenson (2008). Power, Utopia, and the Manipulation of the Historical Consciousness: Perspectives From Collingwood. Utopian Studies 19 (2):233 - 264.score: 21.0
    A recurrent misconception about the concept of utopia fails to realize fully that its essential endeavor constitutes a speculative act involving the distribution of power and resources. Consequently, utopian desire is closely linked to structures of power and can be manipulated by interests in positions of influence within these structures. It is these connections to the machinations of power that bring utopian visions their potential for social/political influence. However, these same types of links also provide avenues for (...)
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  36. M. I. Meltzer (1995). Livestock in Africa: The Economics of Ownership and Production, and the Potential for Improvement. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 12 (2):4-18.score: 21.0
    Livestock are important assets in Africa, helping improve the nutritional status of their owners, and contributing to economic growth. Can these roles continue and can livestock production systems be further developed so that they will be sustainable? A key feature of livestock in Africa is that they fulfill multiple roles, ranging from draught power, to providing manure, milk, and meat. Constraints to increasing productivity include both physical and institutional. In the former category, constraints to adopting draught power (...)
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  37. Giacomo Della Marca Claudio Imperatori, Benedetto Farina, Riccardo Brunetti, Valentina Gnoni, Elisa Testani, Maria I. Quintiliani, Claudia Del Gatto, Allegra Indraccolo, Anna Contardi, Anna M. Speranza (2013). Modifications of EEG Power Spectra in Mesial Temporal Lobe During N-Back Tasks of Increasing Difficulty. A sLORETA Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
    The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM) processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs 3-back). Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (7 men and 7 women, mean age 31.21±7.05 years, range: 23-48). EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were (...)
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  38. Michael Guggenheim (2012). Laboratizing and de-Laboratizing the World Changing Sociological Concepts for Places of Knowledge Production. History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):99-118.score: 21.0
    How has sociology framed places of knowledge production and what is the specific power of the laboratory for this history? This article looks in three steps at how sociology and Science and Technology Studies (STS) have historically framed the world as laboratory. First, in early sociology, the laboratory was an important metaphor to conceive of sociology as a scientific enterprise. In the 1950s, the trend reversed and with the emergence of a ‘qualitative sociology’, sociology was seen in opposition (...)
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  39. Carol Harrington (2012). Governmentality and the Power of Transnational Women's Movements. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):47-63.score: 21.0
    Feminists have celebrated success in gendering security discourse and practice since the end of the Cold War. Scholars have adapted theories of contentious politics to analyze how transnational feminist networks achieved this. I argue that such theories would be enhanced by richer conceptualizations of how transnational feminist networks produce and disseminate new forms of global governmental knowledge and expertise. This article engages social movement theory with theories of global governmentality. Governmentality analysis typically focuses upon governmental power rather than political (...)
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  40. Mika Ojakangas (2007). Impossible Dialogue on Bio-Power: Agamben and Foucault. Foucault Studies 2:5-28.score: 21.0
    In Homo Sacer, Giorgio Agamben criticizes Michel Foucault's distinction between 'productive' bio-power and 'deductive' sovereign power, emphasizing that it is not possible to distinguish between these two. In his view, the production of what he calls 'bare life' is the original, although concealed, activity of sovereign power. In this article, Agamben's conclusions are called into question. (1) The notion of 'bare life', distinguished from the 'form of life', belongs exclusively to the order of sovereignty, being incompatible (...)
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  41. John F. M. McDermott (2007). Producing Labor-Power. Science and Society 71 (3):299 - 321.score: 21.0
    In a contemporary developed economy, the production of labor-power is not left to the "laborer's instincts for selfpreservation and of propagation," as in Capital, but is made subject to large-scale institutional investment and control within, primarily, the educational system. Some therefore of the laborer's consumption of goods and services has no longer a "final" character but directly enters into the production of the most important producer commodity, labor-power itself. This constitutes a partial closure of the circuit (...)
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  42. Bronwen Morrell, Wendy L. Lipworth, Rowena Forsyth, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (2014). Power and Control in Interactions Between Journalists and Health-Related Industries: The View From Industry. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):233-244.score: 21.0
    The mass media is a major source of health information for the public, and as such the quality and independence of health news reporting is an important concern. Concerns have been expressed that journalists reporting on health are increasingly dependent on their sources—including representatives of industries responsible for manufacturing health-related products—for story ideas and content. Many critics perceive an imbalance of power between journalists and industry sources, with industry being in a position of relative power, however the empirical (...)
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  43. Sergei Prozorov (2007). The Unrequited Love of Power: Biopolitical Investment and the Refusal of Care. Foucault Studies 4:53-77.score: 21.0
    Despite its increasing prominence in critical political and IR theory, the significance of the Foucauldian problematic of biopolitics remains underestimated. The frequent conflation of paradigmatically distinct sovereign and biopolitical forms of power, inspired by influential readings of Agamben and Hardt and Negri, results in increasingly incoherent applications of the concept of biopolitics. This is particularly evident in the attempts to theorise resistance to bio-power, which remains cast in conventional 'emancipatory' terms of resisting transcendent and exterior power. Critically (...)
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  44. Lynne Tirrell (1997). Language and Power. In Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Marion Young (eds.), A Companion to Feminist Philosophy,. Blackwell.score: 21.0
    This article argues that the real promise of feminist philosophy of language is in its account of articulated normativity. Feminist philosophy of language began within a descriptivist framework, seeking to identify and root out sexist discursive practices, like naming practices that subsume women’s identity under men’s, descriptive practices that erase or undermine women’s accomplishments and presence as subjects, and so on. This approach had its limits, and led to increased attention to the discursive practices through which we articulate our experiences (...)
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  45. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2010). A Powerful Theory of Causation. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge. 143--159.score: 18.0
    Hume thought that if you believed in powers, you believed in necessary connections in nature. He was then able to argue that there were none such because anything could follow anything else. But Hume wrong-footed his opponents. A power does not necessitate its manifestations: rather, it disposes towards them in a way that is less than necessary but more than purely contingent. -/- In this paper a dispositional theory of causation is offered. Causes dispose towards their effects and often (...)
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  46. Babette Babich (2007). Heidegger’s Will to Power. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (1):37-60.score: 18.0
    On Heidegger's Beitraege and the influence of Nietzsche's Will to Power (a famous non-book).
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  47. Petri Ylikoski & Jaakko Kuorikoski (2010). Dissecting Explanatory Power. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):201–219.score: 18.0
    Comparisons of rival explanations or theories often involve vague appeals to explanatory power. In this paper, we dissect this metaphor by distinguishing between different dimensions of the goodness of an explanation: non-sensitivity, cognitive salience, precision, factual accuracy and degree of integration. These dimensions are partially independent and often come into conflict. Our main contribution is to go beyond simple stipulation or description by explicating why these factors are taken to be explanatory virtues. We accomplish this by using the contrastive-counterfactual (...)
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  48. Martin Saar (2008). Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.score: 18.0
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (collective) history (...)
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  49. Donovan Miyasaki (2013). Nietzsche's Will to Power as Naturalist Critical Ontology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):251-69.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue that Nietzsche’s published works contain a substantial, although implicit, argument for the will to power as ontology—a critical and descriptive, rather than positive and explanatory, theory of reality. Further, I suggest this ontology is entirely consistent with a naturalist methodology. The will to power ontology follows directly from Nietzsche’s naturalist rejection of three metaphysical presuppositions: substance, efficient causality, and final causality. I show that a number of interpretations, including those of Clark, Schacht, Reginster, (...)
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  50. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This paper explores this tension between the (...)
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