Search results for 'Electromagnetism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
     
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  2. Frank Arntzenius & Hilary Greaves (2009). Time Reversal in Classical Electromagnetism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):557-584.score: 18.0
    Richard Feynman has claimed that anti-particles are nothing but particles `propagating backwards in time'; that time reversing a particle state always turns it into the corresponding anti-particle state. According to standard quantum field theory textbooks this is not so: time reversal does not turn particles into anti-particles. Feynman's view is interesting because, in particular, it suggests a nonstandard, and possibly illuminating, interpretation of the CPT theorem. In this paper, we explore a classical analog of Feynman's view, in the context of (...)
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  3. M. W. Evans (1996). Unification of Gravitation and Electromagnetism with B(3). Foundations of Physics 26 (9):1243-1261.score: 18.0
    The experimentally supported existence of the Evans Vigier field.B (3),in vacuo implies that the gravitational and electromagnetic fields can be unified within the same Ricci tensor, being respectively its symmetric and antisymmetric components in vacuo. The fundamental equations of motion of vacuum electromagnetism are developed in this framework.
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  4. Nikodem J. Popławski (2009). Gravitation, Electromagnetism and Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity. Foundations of Physics 39 (3):307-330.score: 18.0
    The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, that has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the metric Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian, except the zero-field limit, for which the metric tensor is not well-defined. This feature indicates that, for the Ferraris-Kijowski model to be physical, there must exist a background field that depends on the Ricci tensor. The simplest possibility, supported by recent astronomical observations, is the cosmological (...)
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  5. D. Pandres Jr (1977). Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 7 (5-6):421-430.score: 18.0
    We obtain a general relativistic unification of gravitation and electromagnetism by simply(1) restricting the metric so that it admits an orthonormal tetrad representation in which the spacelike vectors are curl-free, and(2) identifying the timelike vector as the potential for an electromagnetic field whose only sources are singularities. It follows that: (A) The energy density is everywhere nonnegative, (B) the space is flat if and only if the electromagnetic field vanishes, (C) the vector potential (through which all curvature enters) admits (...)
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  6. Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen (1985). Einstein: Distant Parallelism and Electromagnetism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 15 (3):365-377.score: 18.0
    Einstein's approach to unified field theories based on the geometry of distant parallelism is discussed. The simplest theory of this type, describing gravitation and electromagnetism, is investigated. It is found that there is a charge-current density vector associated with the geometry. However, in the static spherically symmetric case no singularity-free solutions for this vector exist.
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  7. Harvey R. Brown & Peter Holland, Simple Applications of Noether's First Theorem in Quantum Mechanics and Electromagnetism.score: 18.0
    Internal global symmetries exist for the free non-relativistic Schrodinger particle, whose associated Noether charges---the space integrals of the wavefunction and the wavefunction multiplied by the spatial coordinate---are exhibited. Analogous symmetries in classical electromagnetism are also demonstrated.
     
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  8. M. W. Evans (1994). The Magnetic Fields and Rotation Generators of Free Space Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 24 (11):1519-1542.score: 18.0
    The relation is developed between rotation generators of the Lorentz group and the magnetic fields of free-space electromagnetism. Using these classical relations, it is shown that in the quantum field theory there exists a longitudinal photomagneton, a quantized magnetic flux density operator which is directly proportional to the photon spin angular momentum. Commutation relations are given in the quantum field between the longitudinal photomagneton and the usual transverse magnetic components of quantized electromagnetism. The longitudinal component is phase free, (...)
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  9. Martin Land (2005). Discrete Symmetries of Off-Shell Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 35 (7):1263-1288.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the discrete symmetries of off-shell electromagnetism, the Stueckelberg–Schrodinger relativistic quantum theory and its associated 5D local gauge theory. Seeking a dynamical description of particle/antiparticle interactions, Stueckelberg developed a covariant mechanics with a monotonically increasing Poincaré-invariant parameter. In Stueckelberg’s framework, worldlines are traced out through the parameterized evolution of spacetime events, which may advance or retreat with respect to the laboratory clock, depending on the sign of the energy, so that negative energy trajectories appear as antiparticles when (...)
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  10. Charles P. Poole Jr, Horacio A. Farach & Yakir Aharonov (1980). A Vector Product Formulation of Special Relativity and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 10 (7-8):531-553.score: 18.0
    The vector product method developed in previous articles for space rotations and Lorentz transformations is extended to the cases of four-vectors, anti-symmetric tensors, and their transformations in Minkowski space. The electromagnetic fields are expressed in “six-vector” form using the notationH +iE, and this vector form is shown to be relativistically invariant. The wave equations of electromagnetism are derived using these vector products. The following three equations are deduced, which summarize electrodynamics in a compact form: (1) Maxwell's four equations expressed (...)
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  11. Martin Land (2005). Duality in Off-Shell Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 35 (7):1245-1262.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we examine the Dirac monopole in the framework of Off-Shell Electromagnetism, the five-dimensional U(1) gauge theory associated with Stueckelberg–Schrodinger relativistic quantum theory. After reviewing the Dirac model in four dimensions, we show that the structure of the five-dimensional theory prevents a natural generaliza tion of the Dirac monopole, since the theory is not symmetric under duality transforma tions. It is shown that the duality symmetry can be restored by generalizing the electromagnetic field strength to an element (...)
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  12. David Fryberger (1989). On Generalized Electromagnetism and Dirac Algebra. Foundations of Physics 19 (2):125-159.score: 18.0
    Using a framework of Dirac algebra, the Clifford algebra appropriate for Minkowski space-time, the formulation of classical electromagnetism including both electric and magnetic charge is explored. Employing the two-potential approach of Cabibbo and Ferrari, a Lagrangian is obtained that is dyality invariant and from which it is possible to derive by Hamilton's principle both the symmetrized Maxwell's equations and the equations of motion for both electrically and magnetically charged particles. This latter result is achieved by defining the variation of (...)
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  13. Mark Israelit & Nathan Rosen (1983). A Gauge-Covariant Bimetric Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 13 (10):1023-1045.score: 18.0
    The Weyl theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, as modified by Dirac, contains a gauge-covariant scalar β which has no geometric significance. This is a flaw if one is looking for a geometric description of gravitation and electromagnetism. A bimetric formalism is therefore introduced which enables one to replace β by a geometric quantity. The formalism can be simplified by the use of a gauge-invariant physical metric. The resulting theory agrees with the general relativity for phenomena in the solar (...)
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  14. Peter J. Adams (1979). Scale-Covariant Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 9 (7-8):609-618.score: 18.0
    The theory of scale-covariant gravity is extended to include charged matter and electromagnetism at the classical level. The possibility of charge creation exists and the creation rate of charge differs from the creation rate of matter. A variational principle for scale-covariant gravity and electromagnetism coupled to a charged perfect fluid is given.
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  15. Mark Israelit (1989). A Gauge-Covariant Bimetric Tetrad Theory of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 19 (1):33-55.score: 18.0
    In order to get to a geometrically based theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, a gauge covariant bimetric tetrad space-time is introduced. The Weylian connection vector is derived from the tetrads and it is identified with the electromagnetic potential vector. The formalism is simplified by the use of gauge-invariant quantities. The theory contains a contorsion tensor that is connected with spinning properties of matter. The electromagnetic field may be induced by conventional sources and by spinning matter. In absence of spinning (...)
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  16. Anupam Garg (2012). Classical Electromagnetism in a Nutshell. Princeton University Press.score: 18.0
    I want to compliment the author on the obvious care and expertise with which he assembled this text. If I were to teach a yearlong graduate-level electromagnetism course, I would use this book.
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  17. Gordon Belot (1998). Understanding Electromagnetism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (4):531-555.score: 15.0
    It is often said that the Aharonov-Bohm effect shows that the vector potential enjoys more ontological significance than we previously realized. But how can a quantum-mechanical effect teach us something about the interpretation of Maxwell's theory—let alone about the ontological structure of the world—when both theories are false? I present a rational reconstruction of the interpretative repercussions of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and suggest some morals for our conception of the interpretative enterprise.
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  18. Mathias Frisch (2009). Philosophical Issues in Electromagnetism. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):255-270.score: 15.0
    This paper provides a survey of several philosophical issues arising in classical electrodynamics arguing that there is a philosophically rich set of problems in theories of classical physics that have not yet received the attention by philosophers that they deserve. One issue, which is connected to the philosophy of causation, concerns the temporal asymmetry exhibited by radiation fields in the presence of wave sources. Physicists and philosophers disagree on whether this asymmetry reflects a fundamental causal asymmetry or is due to (...)
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  19. K. A. Brading & T. A. Ryckman (2008). Hilbert's 'Foundations of Physics': Gravitation and Electromagnetism Within the Axiomatic Method. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (1):102-153.score: 15.0
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  20. Timothy H. Boyer (2000). Classical Electromagnetism and the Aharonov–Bohm Phase Shift. Foundations of Physics 30 (6):907-932.score: 15.0
    Although there is good experimental evidence for the Aharonov–Bohm phase shift occurring when a solenoid is placed between the beams forming a double-slit electron interference pattern, there has been very little analysis of the relevant classical electromagnetic forces. These forces between a point charge and a solenoid involve subtle relativistic effects of order v 2 /c 2 analogous to those discussed by Coleman and Van Vleck in their treatment of the Shockley–James paradox. In this article we show that a treatment (...)
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  21. Lawrence Fagg (1997). Electromagnetism, Time and Immanence in Whitehead's Metaphysics. Process Studies 26 (3/4):308-317.score: 15.0
  22. Timothy Eastman (2000). Electromagnetism and the Sacred. Process Studies 29 (1):187-188.score: 15.0
  23. Timothy Shanahan (1989). Kant, Naturphilosophie, and Oersted's Discovery of Electromagnetism: A Reassessment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (3):287-305.score: 15.0
  24. W. A. Rodrigues Jr & J. Vaz Jr (1998). From Electromagnetism to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 28 (5):789-814.score: 15.0
    We study the relationship between Maxwell and Dirac equations for a class of solutions of Maxwell equations that can represent purely electromagnetic particles.
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  25. Herbert Dingle (1960). Relativity and Electromagnetism: An Epistemological Appraisal. Philosophy of Science 27 (3):233-253.score: 15.0
    This paper follows up the analysis of relativity theory begun by Margenau and Mould, by including electromagnetic theory which in their treatment was tacitly accepted. It is shown that the experiments on which Margenau and Mould rely to establish the special theory of relativity actually confirm the mutual consistency of the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetic theory and the special relativity theory, but throw no light on the validity of the two theories taken jointly. It is further shown that a modification of the (...)
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  26. M. W. Evans (1994). Classical Relativistic Theory of the Longitudinal Ghost Fields of Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 24 (12):1671-1688.score: 15.0
    The classical relativistic theory is developed of electric and magnetic fields in terms of boost and rotation generators, respectively, of the Lorentz group of space-time. This development shows that Minkowski geometry requires that there be threestates of polarization of radiation in free space. The magnetic components in a circular basis are right and left circular and longitudinal. The longitudinal component is real and physical, and proportional to one of the three, nonzero, rotation generators of the Lorentz group. The longitudinal electric (...)
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  27. M. C. Land & L. P. Horwitz (1991). Green's Functions for Off-Shell Electromagnetism and Spacelike Correlations. Foundations of Physics 21 (3):299-310.score: 15.0
    The requirement of gauge invariance for the Schwinger-DeWitt equations, interpreted as a manifestly covariant quantum theory for the evolution of a system in spacetime, implies the existence of a five-dimensional pre-Maxwell field on the manifold of spacetime and “proper time” τ. The Maxwell theory is contained in this theory; integration of the field equations over τ restores the Maxwell equations with the usual interpretation of the sources. Following Schwinger's techniques, we study the Green's functions for the five-dimensional hyperbolic field equations (...)
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  28. David Saad, L. P. Horwitz & R. I. Arshansky (1989). Off-Shell Electromagnetism in Manifestly Covariant Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 19 (10):1125-1149.score: 15.0
    Gauge invariance of a manifestly covariant relativistic quantum theory with evolution according to an invariant time τ implies the existence of five gauge compensation fields, which we shall call pre-Maxwell fields. A Lagrangian which generates the equations of motion for the matter field (coinciding with the Schrödinger type quantum evolution equation) as well as equations, on a five-dimensional manifold, for the gauge fields, is written. It is shown that τ integration of the equations for the pre-Maxwell fields results in the (...)
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  29. P. F. Browne (1977). Complementary Aspects of Gravitation and Electromagnetism. Foundations of Physics 7 (3-4):165-183.score: 15.0
    A convention with regard to geometry, accepting nonholonomic aether motion and coordinate-dependent units, is always valid as an alternative to Einstein's convention. Choosing flat spacetime, Newtonian gravitation is extended, step by step, until equations closely analogous to those of Einstein's theory are obtained. The first step, demanded by considerations of inertia, is the introduction of a vector potential. Treating the electromagnetic and gravitational fields as real and imaginary components of a complex field (gravitational mass being treated as imaginary charge), the (...)
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  30. Carver A. Mead (2002). Collective Electrodynamics: Quantum Foundations of Electromagnetism. The Mit Press.score: 15.0
    Carver Mead offers a radically new approach to the standard problems of electromagnetic theory.
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  31. Nahum Kipnis (2005). Chance in Science: The Discovery of Electromagnetism by HC Oersted. Science and Education 14 (1):1-28.score: 15.0
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  32. Edward Purdy Ney (1962). Electromagnetism and Relativity. New York, Harper & Row.score: 15.0
     
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  33. Fanny Seroglou, Panagiotis Koumaras & Vassilis Tselfes (1998). History of Science and Instructional Design: The Case of Electromagnetism. Science and Education 7 (3):261-280.score: 15.0
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  34. H. A. M. Snelders (1975). The Reception in the Netherlands of the Discoveries of Electromagnetism and Electrodynamics (1820–1822). Annals of Science 32 (1):39-54.score: 15.0
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  35. Lydia Patton (2010). Review: Hyder, The Determinate World: Kant and Helmholtz on the Physical Meaning of Geometry. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).score: 9.0
    Hyder constructs two historical narratives. First, he gives an account of Helmholtz's relation to Kant, from the famous Raumproblem, which preoccupied philosophers, geometers, and scientists in the mid-19th century, to Helmholtz's arguments in his four papers on geometry from 1868 to 1878 that geometry is, in some sense, an empirical science (chapters 5 and 6). The second theme is the argument for the necessity of central forces to a determinate scientific description of physical reality, an abiding concern of Helmholtz's, and (...)
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  36. Francisco Antonio Doria (2009). Theoretical Physics: A Primer for Philosophers of Science. Principia 13 (2):195-232.score: 9.0
    We give a overview of the main areas in theoretical physics, with emphasis on their relation to Lagrangian formalism in classical mechanics. This review covers classical mechanics; the road from classical mechanics to Schrodinger's quantum mechanics; electromagnetism, special and general relativity, and (very briefly) gauge field theory and the Higgs mechanism. We shun mathematical rigor in favor of a straightforward presentation.
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  37. R. Eugene Collins (2005). The Mathematical Basis for Physical Laws. Foundations of Physics 35 (5):743-785.score: 9.0
    Laws of mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, gravitation and relativity are derived as “related mathematical identities” based solely on the existence of a joint probability distribution for the position and velocity of a particle moving on a Riemannian manifold. This probability formalism is necessary because continuous variables are not precisely observable. These demonstrations explain why these laws must have the forms previously discovered through experiment and empirical deduction. Indeed, the very existence of electric, magnetic and gravitational fields is predicted by (...)
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  38. Or Sela, Boaz Tamir, Shahar Dolev & Avshalom C. Elitzur (2009). Can Special Relativity Be Derived From Galilean Mechanics Alone? Foundations of Physics 39 (5):499-509.score: 9.0
    Special relativity is based on the apparent contradiction between two postulates, namely, Galilean vs. c-invariance. We show that anomalies ensue by holding the former postulate alone. In order for Galilean invariance to be consistent, it must hold not only for bodies’ motions, but also for the signals and forces they exchange. If the latter ones do not obey the Galilean version of the Velocities Addition Law, invariance is violated. If, however, they do, causal anomalies, information loss and conservation laws’ violations (...)
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  39. Frank Haney (1994). Alternativen der Wissenschaftsgeschichte. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (2):207 - 222.score: 9.0
    Alternatives in the History of Science. The paper deals with the function of the scientist's subjective activity in the research process. This will be discussed at the background of the discourse between distant action and narrow action theories of electromagnetism in 19th century physics. The analysis shows in which high degree the protagonists of these theories (Weber, Maxwell) regarded this situation consciously as a bifurcation (alternative) in the development of their science. This article describes then how the history of (...)
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  40. J. McFadden (2002). The Conscious Electromagnetic Information (Cemi) Field Theory: The Hard Problem Made Easy? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (8):45-60.score: 6.0
  41. Alon Drory (2013). Special Relativity Cannot Be Derived From Galilean Mechanics Alone. Foundations of Physics 43 (5):665-684.score: 6.0
    A recent paper suggested that if Galilean covariance was extended to signals and interactions, the resulting theory would contain such anomalies as would have impelled physicists towards special relativity even without empirical prompts. I analyze this claim. Some so-called anomalies turn out to be errors. Others have classical analogs, which suggests that classical physicists would not have viewed them as anomalous. Still others, finally, remain intact in special relativity, so that they serve as no impetus towards this theory. I conclude (...)
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  42. Mark Israelit (2005). Wesson's Induced Matter Theory with a Weylian Bulk. Foundations of Physics 35 (10):1725-1748.score: 6.0
  43. Diego L. Rapoport (2005). On the Unification of Geometric and Random Structures Through Torsion Fields: Brownian Motions, Viscous and Magneto-Fluid-Dynamics. Foundations of Physics 35 (7):1205-1244.score: 6.0
  44. Susan Pockett (2002). Difficulties with the Electromagnetic Field Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):51-56.score: 6.0
  45. J. McFadden (2002). Synchronous Firing and its Influence on the Brain's Electromagnetic Field: Evidence for an Electromagnetic Field Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):23-50.score: 6.0
  46. Robert W. Batterman (2014). The Inconsistency of Physics (with a Capital “P”). Synthese 191 (13):2973-2992.score: 6.0
    This paper discusses a conception of physics as a collection of theories that, from a logical point of view, is inconsistent. It is argued that this logical conception of the relations between physical theories is too crude. Mathematical subtleties allow for a much more nuanced and sophisticated understanding of the relations between different physical theories.
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  47. Timothy H. Boyer (2012). The Blackbody Radiation Spectrum Follows From Zero-Point Radiation and the Structure of Relativistic Spacetime in Classical Physics. Foundations of Physics 42 (5):595-614.score: 6.0
    The analysis of this article is entirely within classical physics. Any attempt to describe nature within classical physics requires the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation so as to account for the Casimir forces between parallel conducting plates at low temperatures. Furthermore, conformal symmetry carries solutions of Maxwell’s equations into solutions. In an inertial frame, conformal symmetry leaves zero-point radiation invariant and does not connect it to non-zero-temperature; time-dilating conformal transformations carry the Lorentz-invariant zero-point radiation spectrum into zero-point radiation (...)
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  48. Alexander Afriat (2013). Weyl's Gauge Argument. Foundations of Physics 43 (5):699-705.score: 6.0
    The standard $\mathbb{U}(1)$ “gauge principle” or “gauge argument” produces an exact potential A=dλ and a vanishing field F=d 2 λ=0. Weyl (in Z. Phys. 56:330–352, 1929; Rice Inst. Pam. 16:280–295, 1929) has his own gauge argument, which is sketchy, archaic and hard to follow; but at least it produces an inexact potential A and a nonvanishing field F=dA≠0. I attempt a reconstruction.
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  49. Sergey G. Fedosin (2007). Electromagnetic and Gravitational Pictures of the World. Apeiron 14 (4):385-413.score: 6.0
    The review of the theory of electromagnetic field together with the special and general theories of relativity has been made. The similar theory of gravitation has been presented which has the property of Lorentz-invariancy in its own representation in which the information is transferred at the speed of propagation of the gravitational field. Generalization of the specified gravitation theory on noninertial reference systems has been made with the help of the mathematical apparatus of the general relativity. It allows to avoid (...)
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  50. Banesh Hoffmann (1932). On the Spherically Symmetric Field in Relativity. [London, Printed at the Oxford University Press by J. Johnson.score: 6.0
     
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