Search results for 'Elen Stokes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Diana M. Bowman, Elen Stokes & Michael G. Bennett (2013). Anticipating the Societal Challenges of Nanotechnologies. Nanoethics 7 (1):1-5.score: 120.0
    “In this article we sketch out the landscape for this Special Issue on anticipating and embedding the societal challenge of nanotechnologies. Tools that actors may choose to employ for these processes are articulated, and further explored through the introduction of the seven articles which comprise this Issue. Taken together, these articles create a cogent narrative on the societal challenges posed by nanotechnologies. They are drawn together by three distinct themes, each of which is briefly considered within this context of this (...)
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  2. Chris Groves, Lori Frater, Robert Lee & Elen Stokes (2011). Is There Room at the Bottom for CSR? Corporate Social Responsibility and Nanotechnology in the UK. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):525-552.score: 120.0
    Nanotechnologies are enabling technologies which rely on the manipulation of matter on the scale of billionths of a metre. It has been argued that scientific uncertainties surrounding nanotechnologies and the inability of regulatory agencies to keep up with industry developments mean that voluntary regulation will play a part in the development of nanotechnologies. The development of technological applications based on nanoscale science is now increasingly seen as a potential test case for new models of regulation based on future-oriented responsibility, lifecycle (...)
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  3. Patrick Stokes (2012). Ghosts in the Machine: Do the Dead Live on in Facebook? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 25 (3):363-379.score: 60.0
    Abstract Of the many ways in which identity is constructed and performed online, few are as strongly ‘anchored’ to existing offline relationships as in online social networks like Facebook and Myspace. These networks utilise profiles that extend our practical, psychological and even corporeal identity in ways that give them considerable phenomenal presence in the lives of spatially distant people. This raises interesting questions about the persistence of identity when these online profiles survive the deaths of the users behind them, via (...)
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  4. D. E. Stokes (1997). Pasteur's Quadrant: Basic Science and Technological Innovation. Brookings Inst Pr.score: 60.0
    In this book, Donald Stokes challenges Bush's view and maintains that we can only rebuild the relationship between government and the scientific community when we understand what is wrong with that view.Stokes begins with an analysis of the ...
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  5. Lisa Odham Stokes & Michael Hoover (2003). Comments on Karen Fang's Review of City on Fire: Hong Kong Cinema. Film-Philosophy 7 (5).score: 60.0
    Karen Fang 'The Poverty of Sociological Studies of Hong Kong Cinema: Stokes and Hoover's _City on Fire_' _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 7 no. 36, October 2003.
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  6. Dustin Stokes (2014). Cognitive Penetration and the Perception of Art. Dialectica 68 (1):1-34.score: 30.0
    There are good, even if inconclusive, reasons to think that cognitive penetration of perception occurs: that cognitive states like belief causally affect, in a relatively direct way, the contents of perceptual experience. The supposed importance of – indeed as it is suggested here, what is definitive of – this possible phenomenon is that it would result in important epistemic and scientific consequences. One interesting and intuitive consequence entirely unremarked in the extant literature concerns the perception of art. Intuition has it (...)
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  7. Dustin Stokes & Vincent Bergeron, Modular Architectures and Informational Encapsulation: A Dilemma.score: 30.0
    Amongst philosophers and cognitive scientists, modularity remains a popular choice for an architecture of the human mind, primarily because of the supposed explanatory value of this approach. Modular architectures can vary both with respect to the strength of the notion of modularity and the scope of the modularity of mind. We propose a dilemma for modular architectures, no matter how these architectures vary along these two dimensions. First, if a modular architecture commits to the informational encapsulation of modules, as it (...)
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  8. Dustin Stokes (2012). Perceiving and Desiring: A New Look at the Cognitive Penetrability of Experience. Philosophical Studies 158 (3):479-92.score: 30.0
    This paper considers an orectic penetration hypothesis which says that desires and desire-like states may influence perceptual experience in a non-externally mediated way. This hypothesis is clarified with a definition, which serves further to distinguish the interesting target phenomenon from trivial and non-genuine instances of desire-influenced perception. Orectic penetration is an interesting possible case of the cognitive penetrability of perceptual experience. The orectic penetration hypothesis is thus incompatible with the more common thesis that perception is cognitively impenetrable. It is of (...)
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  9. Dustin Stokes (2009). Aesthetics and Cognitive Science. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):715-733.score: 30.0
    Experiences of art involve exercise of ordinary cognitive and perceptual capacities but in unique ways. These two features of experiences of art imply the mutual importance of aesthetics and cognitive science. Cognitive science provides empirical and theoretical analysis of the relevant cognitive capacities. Aesthetics thus does well to incorporate cognitive scientific research. Aesthetics also offers philosophical analysis of the uniqueness of the experience of art. Thus, cognitive science does well to incorporate the explanations of aesthetics. This paper explores this general (...)
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  10. Dustin Stokes (2013). Cognitive Penetrability of Perception. Philosophy Compass 8 (7):646-663.score: 30.0
    Perception is typically distinguished from cognition. For example, seeing is importantly different from believing. And while what one sees clearly influences what one thinks, it is debatable whether what one believes and otherwise thinks can influence, in some direct and non-trivial way, what one sees. The latter possible relation is the cognitive penetration of perception. Cognitive penetration, if it occurs, has implications for philosophy of science, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and cognitive science. This paper offers an analysis of the phenomenon, (...)
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  11. Dustin R. Stokes (2006). The Evaluative Character of Imaginative Resistance. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):287-405.score: 30.0
    A fiction may prescribe imagining that a pig can talk or tell the future. A fiction may prescribe imagining that torturing innocent persons is a good thing. We generally comply with imaginative prescriptions like the former, but not always with prescriptions like the latter: we imagine non-evaluative fictions without difficulty but sometimes resist imagining value-rich fictions. Thus arises the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Most analyses of the phenomenon focus on the content of the relevant imaginings. The present analysis focuses instead (...)
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  12. Dustin Stokes (2008). A Metaphysics of Creativity. In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomson-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan. 105--124.score: 30.0
  13. Dustin Stokes (2007). Incubated Cognition and Creativity. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (3):83-100.score: 30.0
    Many traditional theories of creativity put heavy emphasis on an incubation stage in creative cognitive processes. The basic phenomenon is a familiar one: we are working on a task or problem, we leave it aside for some period of time, and when we return attention to the task we have some new insight that services completion of the task. This feature, combined with other ostensibly mysterious features of creativity, has discouraged naturalists from theorizing creativity. This avoidance is misguided: we can (...)
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  14. Dustin Stokes & Stephen Biggs (forthcoming). The Dominance of the Visual. In D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.), Perception and its Modalities. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Vision often dominates other perceptual modalities both at the level of experience and at the level of judgment. In the well-known McGurk effect, for example, one’s auditory experience is consistent with the visual stimuli but not the auditory stimuli, and naïve subjects’ judgments follow their experience. Structurally similar effects occur for other modalities (e.g. rubber hand illusions). Given the robustness of this visual dominance, one might not be surprised that visual imagery often dominates imagery in other modalities. One might be (...)
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  15. Dustin Stokes (2006). Art and Modal Knowledge. In Dominic Lopes & Matthew Kieran (eds.), Knowing Art: Essays in Epistemology and Aesthetics. Springer.score: 30.0
  16. D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.) (forthcoming). Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  17. Dustin Stokes (2011). Minimally Creative Thought. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):658-681.score: 30.0
    Creativity has received, and continues to receive, comparatively little analysis in philosophy and the brain and behavioural sciences. This is in spite of the importance of creative thought and action, and the many and varied resources of theories of mind. Here an alternative approach to analyzing creativity is suggested: start from the bottom up with minimally creative thought. Minimally creative thought depends non-accidentally upon agency, is novel relative to the acting agent, and could not have been tokened before the time (...)
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  18. Dustin Stokes (forthcoming). Towards a Consequentialist Understanding of Cognitive Penetration. In A. Raftopoulos & J. Ziembekis (eds.), Cognitive Effects on Perception: New Philosophical Perspectives.score: 30.0
    Philosophers of mind and cognitive scientists have recently taken renewed interest in cognitive penetration, in particular, in the cognitive penetration of perceptual experience. The question is whether cognitive states like belief influence perceptual experience in some important way. Since the possible phenomenon is an empirical one, the strategy for analysis has, predictably, proceeded as follows: define the phenomenon and then, definition in hand, interpret various psychological data. However, different theorists offer different and apparently inconsistent definitions. And so in addition to (...)
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  19. Geoff Stokes (1997). Karl Popper's Political Philosophy of Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (1):56-79.score: 30.0
    This article examines critically Popper's arguments for a "unity of method" between natural science and social science. It discusses Popper's writings on the goals of science, the objects of scientific inquiry, the logic of scientific method, and the value of objectivity The major argument is that, despite his unifying intention, Popper himself provides good reasons for treating the two sciences differently. Popper proposes that social scientists follow a number of rules that are not required for, and that have no direct (...)
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  20. Douglas M. Stokes, Consciousness and the Physical World.score: 30.0
  21. Dustin Stokes (forthcoming). The Role of Imagination in Creativity. In E. Paul & S. B. Kaufman (eds.), The philosophy of creativity. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  22. Patrick Stokes (2012). Is Narrative Identity Four-Dimensionalist? European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):e86-e106.score: 30.0
    The claim that selves are narratively constituted has attained considerable currency in both analytic and continental philosophy. However, a set of increasingly standard objections to narrative identity are also emerging. In this paper, I focus on metaphysically realist versions of narrative identity theory, showing how they both build on and differ from their neo-Lockean counterparts. But I also argue that narrative realism is implicitly committed to a four-dimensionalist, temporal-parts ontology of persons. That exposes narrative realism to the charge that the (...)
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  23. Patrick Stokes (2008). Locke, Kierkegaard and the Phenomenology of Personal Identity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):645 – 672.score: 30.0
    Personal Identity theorists as diverse as Derek Parfit, Marya Schechtman and Galen Strawson have noted that the experiencing subject (the locus of present psychological experience) and the person (a human being with a career/narrative extended across time) are not necessarily coextensive. Accordingly, we can become psychologically alienated from, and fail to experience a sense of identity with, the person we once were or will be. This presents serious problems for Locke's original account of “sameness of consciousness” constituting personal identity, given (...)
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  24. Mitchell O. Stokes (2007). Van Inwagen and the Quine-Putnam Indispensability Argument. Erkenntnis 67 (3):439 - 453.score: 30.0
    In this paper I do two things: (1) I support the claim that there is still some confusion about just what the Quine-Putnam indispensability argument is and the way it employs Quinean meta-ontology and (2) I try to dispel some of this confusion by presenting the argument in a way which reveals its important meta-ontological features, and include these features explicitly as premises. As a means to these ends, I compare Peter van Inwagen’s argument for the existence of properties with (...)
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  25. Stephen Biggs, Mohan Matthen & Dustin Stokes (forthcoming). Sorting the Senses. In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and its Modalities. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    We perceive in many ways. But several dubious presuppositions about the senses mask this diversity of perception. Philosophers, scientists, and engineers alike too often presuppose that the senses (vision, audition, etc.) are independent sources of information, perception being a sum of these independent contributions. We too often presuppose that we can generalize from vision to other senses. We too often presuppose that vision itself is best understood as a passive receptacle for an image thrown by a lens. In this essay (...)
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  26. Douglas M. Stokes (1997). The Nature of Mind: Parapsychology and the Role of Consciousness in the Physical World. McFarland and Co.score: 30.0
  27. D. Stokes (2006). Review of Mohan Matthen-Seeing, Doing, and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):323-325.score: 30.0
  28. Patrick Stokes (2007). Kierkegaard's Mirrors: The Immediacy of Moral Vision. Inquiry 50 (1):70 – 94.score: 30.0
    This paper explores Kierkegaard's recurrent use of mirrors as a metaphor for various aspects of moral imagination and vision. While a writer centrally concerned with issues of self-examination, selfhood and passionate subjectivity might well be expected to be attracted to such metaphors, there are deeper reasons why Kierkegaard is drawn to this analogy. The specifically visual aspects of the mirror metaphor reveal certain crucial features of Kierkegaard's model of moral cognition. In particular, the felicity of the metaphors of the "mirror (...)
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  29. Patrick Stokes (2011). Naked Subjectivity: Minimal Vs. Narrative Selves in Kierkegaard. Inquiry 53 (4):356-382.score: 30.0
    In recent years a significant debate has arisen as to whether Kierkegaard offers a version of the “narrative approach” to issues of personal identity and self-constitution. In this paper I do not directly take sides in this debate, but consider instead the applicability of a recent development in the broader literature on narrative identity—the distinction between the temporally-extended “narrative self” and the non-extended “minimal self—to Kierkegaard's work. I argue that such a distinction is both necessary for making sense of Kierkegaard's (...)
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  30. Patrick Stokes (2010). Fearful Asymmetry: Kierkegaard's Search for the Direction of Time. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):485-507.score: 30.0
    The ancient problem of whether our asymmetrical attitudes towards time are justified (or normatively required) remains a live one in contemporary philosophy. Drawing on themes in the work of McTaggart, Parfit, and Heidegger, I argue that this problem is also a key concern of Kierkegaard’s Either/Or (1843). Part I of Either/Or presents the “aesthete” as living a temporally volatilized form of life, devoid of temporal location, sequence and direction. Like Parfit’s character “Timeless,” these aesthetes are indifferent to the direction of (...)
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  31. Michael C. Stokes (1965). On Anaxagoras Part I: Anäxagoras' Theory of Matter. Archiv für Geschichte Der Philosophie 47 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
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  32. Patrick Stokes (2011). Selves: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (4):619 - 624.score: 30.0
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 619-624, October 2011.
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  33. G. S. Kirk & Michael C. Stokes (1960). Parmenides' Refutation of Motion. Phronesis 5 (1):1 - 4.score: 30.0
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  34. G. J. Stokes (1895). Gnosticism and Modern Pantheism. Mind 4 (15):320-333.score: 30.0
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  35. Patrick Stokes (forthcoming). Crossing the Bridge: The First-Person and Time. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-18.score: 30.0
    Personal identity theory has become increasingly sensitive to the importance of the first-person perspective. However, certain ways of speaking about that perspective do not allow the full temporal aspects of first-person perspectives on the self to come into view. In this paper I consider two recent phenomenologically-informed discussions of personal identity that end up yielding metaphysically divergent views of the self: those of Barry Dainton and Galen Strawson. I argue that when we take a properly temporally indexical view of the (...)
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  36. Michael C. Stokes (1965). On Anaxagoras Part II: The Order of Cosmogony. Archiv für Geschichte Der Philosophie 47 (1):217-250.score: 30.0
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  37. M. C. Stokes (1969). The Greek Atomists D.J. Furley: Two Studies in the Greek Atomists. Pp. Vii+256. Princeton: University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1967. Cloth, 6Os. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (03):286-289.score: 30.0
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  38. Gilian Stokes (2007). Different Voices in Nurse Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):494–505.score: 30.0
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  39. Michael C. Stokes (1962). Hesiodic and Milesian Cosmogonies1 -I. Phronesis 7 (1):1-37.score: 30.0
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  40. Gale Stokes (1994). Nationalism, Responsibility, and the People-as-One. Studies in East European Thought 46 (1-2):91 - 103.score: 30.0
  41. Patrick Stokes (2011). Uniting the Perspectival Subject: Two Approaches. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):23-44.score: 30.0
    Visual forms of episodic memory and anticipatory imagination involve images that, by virtue of their perspectival organization, imply a notional subject of experience. But they contain no inbuilt reference to the actual subject, the person actually doing the remembering or imagining. This poses the problem of what (if anything) connects these two perspectival subjects and what differentiates cases of genuine memory and anticipation from mere imagined seeing. I consider two approaches to this problem. The first, exemplified by Wollheim and Velleman, (...)
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  42. Adrian Stokes (1959). Form in Art: A Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (2):193-203.score: 30.0
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  43. Michael C. Stokes (1963). Hesiodic and Milesian Cosmogonies- III. Phronesis 8 (1):1-34.score: 30.0
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  44. George J. Stokes (1884). Going Back to Kant. Mind 9 (34):274-281.score: 30.0
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  45. Adrian Stokes (1964). Herbert Read. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (3):195-197.score: 30.0
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  46. Patrick Stokes (2008). “Interest” in Kierkegaard's Structure of Consciousness. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):437-458.score: 30.0
    Kierkegaard’s identification of “consciousness” with “interest” (interesse) in his unfinished work Johannes Climacus adds a distinctive dimension to his phenomenology of subjectivity. Commentators, however, have largely identified interesse with lidenskab (“passion”), a conflation I argue to be mistaken, or have otherwise failed to note the structural implications of interesse for Kierkegaard’s account of cognition. I draw out these implications and argue that the Climacan account of interest as the experience of finding ourselves in-between ideality and reality implies, in the context (...)
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  47. G. J. Stokes (1900). Logical Theory of the Imaginary. Mind 9 (35):349-355.score: 30.0
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  48. Geoff Stokes (1988). Mechanism and Method in the Evolution of Science: A Response to Hull. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):219-223.score: 30.0
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  49. J. G. Phelps Stokes (1901). On the Relation of Settlement Work to the Evils of Poverty. International Journal of Ethics 11 (3):340-345.score: 30.0
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  50. Patrick Stokes (2010). 'See for Your Self': Contemporaneity, Autopsy and Presence in Kierkegaard's Moral-Religious Psychology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):297 – 319.score: 30.0
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