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Elena Lieven [7]Elena V. M. Lieven [3]Elena Vm Lieven [1]
  1. Ben Ambridge, Claire H. Noble & Elena V. M. Lieven (2014). The Semantics of the Transitive Causative Construction: Evidence From a Forced-Choice Pointing Study with Adults and Children. Cognitive Linguistics 25 (2):293-311.
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  2. Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2014). Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences. Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while the (...)
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  3. Paul Ibbotson, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2013). The Attention-Grammar Interface: Eye-Gaze Cues Structural Choice in Children and Adults. Cognitive Linguistics 24 (3).
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  4. Daniel Schmerse, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2013). Discourse Particles and Belief Reasoning: The Case of German Doch. Journal of Semantics 31 (1):fft001.
    Next SectionDiscourse particles typically express the attitudes of interlocutors with respect to the propositional content of an utterance – for example, marking whether or not a speaker believes the content of the proposition that she uttered. In German, the particle doch – which has no direct English translation – is commonly used to correct a belief that is thought to be common ground among those present. We asked whether German adults and 5-year-olds are able to infer that a speaker who (...)
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  5. Paul Ibbotson, Anna L. Theakston, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2012). Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons. Cognitive Science 36 (7):1268-1288.
    This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction (...)
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  6. Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2012). Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
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  7. Caroline F. Rowland, Franklin Chang, Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Elena Vm Lieven (2012). The Development of Abstract Syntax: Evidence From Structural Priming and the Lexical Boost. Cognition 125 (1):49-63.
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  8. Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2011). “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less restricted (...)
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  9. Jeffrey Loewenstein, Chip Heath, Steven Sloman, Aron K. Barbey, Jared M. Hotaling, Max M. Louwerse, Rolf A. Zwaan, Sabine Stoll, Kirsten Abbot-Smith & Elena Lieven (2009). Subject Index to Volume 33. Cognitive Science 33:1526-1531.
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  10. Sabine Stoll, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith & Elena Lieven (2009). Lexically Restricted Utterances in Russian, German, and English Child‐Directed Speech. Cognitive Science 33 (1):75-103.
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  11. Thea Cameron‐Faulkner, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2003). A Construction Based Analysis of Child Directed Speech. Cognitive Science 27 (6):843-873.
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