Search results for 'Elite (Social sciences' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Don K. Price (1988). The Natural Sciences, the Social Sciences and Politics. Minerva 26 (3):416-428.
    The social sciences stand at a strange crossroads. There is a greater need for disciplined inquiry into the issues of policy facing the United States. Yet the incentives in the political system, and in the professional guilds of those performing social research, discourage a close involvement of many prominent social scientists with policy. The political system, fearing an elite imposing its values on society, welcomes the natural scientist who seems to conform to the model of the politically neutral (...)
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  2.  16
    David L. Swartz (2008). Social Closure in American Elite Higher Education. Theory and Society 37 (4):409-419.
  3. Johannes Beverungen (2005). Elite Planning Organizations: Traditionen, Charakteristika, Implikationen der Trilateral Commission. Nomos.
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  4. Bruce Detwiler (1990). Nietzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism. University of Chicago Press.
  5. Ettore A. Albertoni (1987). Mosca and the Theory of Elitism. B. Blackwell.
     
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  6. Ho-tʻae Kim (2008). Hŏnpŏp Ŭi Nun Ŭro Tʻoegye Rŭl Ponda. Mirae Rŭl Yŏnŭn Chʻaek.
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  7. John Medearis (2001). Joseph Schumpeter's Two Theories of Democracy. Harvard University Press.
     
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  8. P. A. Sapronov (2008). Vlastʹ: Proshloe I Budushchee. In-T Ėkonomicheskikh Strategiĭ.
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  9.  8
    John C. Waller (2001). Gentlemanly Men of Science: Sir Francis Galton and the Professionalization of the British Life-Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):83 - 114.
    Because Francis Galton (1822-1911) was a well-connected gentleman scientist with substantial private means, the importance of the role he played in the professionalization of the Victorian life-sciences has been considered anomalous. In contrast to the X-clubbers, he did not seem to have any personal need for the reforms his Darwinist colleagues were advocating. Nor for making common cause with individuals haling from social strata clearly inferior to his own. However, in this paper I argue that Galton quite realistically discerned (...)
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  10.  37
    Steve Fuller (2014). The Higher Whitewash. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1):86-101.
    An assessment of Joel Isaac’s recent, well-researched attempt to provide a context for the emergence of Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. That context consisted in the open space for cross-disciplinary projects between the natural and social sciences that existed at Harvard during the presidency of James Bryant Conant, from the early 1930s to the early 1950s. Isaac’s work at the Harvard archives adds interesting detail to a story whose general contours are already known. In particular, he reinforces the (...)
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  11.  13
    Paul D. Mclean (2004). Widening Access While Tightening Control: Office-Holding, Marriages, and Elite Consolidation in Early Modern Poland. Theory and Society 33 (2):167-212.
  12. Jason Oakes (2015). Alliances in Human Biology: The Harvard Committee on Industrial Physiology, 1929–1939. Journal of the History of Biology 48 (3):365-390.
    In 1929 the newly-reorganized Rockefeller Foundation funded the work of a cross-disciplinary group at Harvard University called the Committee on Industrial Physiology. The committee’s research and pedagogical work was oriented towards different things for different members of the alliance. The CIP program included a research component in the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Elton May’s interpretation of the Hawthorne Studies; a pedagogical aspect as part of Wallace Donham’s curriculum for Harvard Business School; and Lawrence Henderson’s work with the Harvard Pareto Circle, (...)
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  13.  3
    N. R. Sheth (1995). Values in Search of an Identity. Journal of Human Values 1 (1):75-91.
    This paper makes an attempt to examine the various facets of human values in the background of the widely shared popular beliefs about erosion of values. A random sample of elite opinions on the nature of decline of values brings out the difficulties involved in identifying values for social analysis. Values are an integral part of the religious, spiritual and governmental spheres of social behaviour within a culture. It is argued that the problem of erosion of values is shared (...)
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  14.  1
    Johanna Siméant (2015). Three Bodies of Moral Economy: The Diffusion of a Concept. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):163-175.
    This article explores some aspects of the renewed interest in moral economy and draws attention to the pitfalls if the concept is used too loosely. Edward P. Thompson and James C. Scott's model is examined to see how their elaboration of moral economy can be used to link food, popular indignation, reinvention of tradition, and relationships to the elite. Moral economy was an alternative to considering crowds as irrational, eruptive, or driven only by hunger. By studying how the notion (...)
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  15.  5
    Ronald Curtis (1993). Review Essays : Does Science Belong to its Elite? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):77-83.
  16.  3
    Mariia Grynenko (2016). Філософська система миколи шлемкевича і її актуальність для формування світогляду українців. Схід 2:71-73.
    The philosophical inheritance of Mykola Shlemkevich remains small worked out for today. In part because his works have been scattered, published in various publications under pseudonyms, in part, because of the fact that he has long been is attached the label "nationalist" and sometimes "nationalist fascist. Mykola`s Shlemkevich works fold the philosophical system and it is an obvious fact. They are incorporated by structural and methodological community. It is important to consider the Shlemkevych`s philosophical system it in its fullness and (...)
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  17. Julian Martin (1992). Francis Bacon, the State and the Reform of Natural Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Why was it that Francis Bacon, trained for high political office, devoted himself to proposing a celebrated and sweeping reform of the natural sciences? Julian Martin's investigative study looks at Bacon's family context, his employment in Queen Elizabeth's security service and his radical critique of the relationship between the Common Law and the Monarchy, to find the key to this important question. Deeply conservative and elitist in his political views, Bacon adapted Tudor strategies of State management and bureaucracy, the (...)
     
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  18.  2
    Steindór J. Erlingsson (2002). From Haeckelian Monist to Anti-Haeckelian Vitalist: The Transformation of the Icelandic Naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):443 - 470.
    Iceland has not been known as a contributor to the history of science. This small nation in the North-Atlantic has only in recent decades made its mark on international science. But the Icelandic naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921) is an exception to this generalisation, for he was well known at the turn of the 20th century in Europe and America for his research on the geography and geology of Iceland. Though Thoroddsen's contribution to these sciences is of great interest there (...)
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  19.  7
    Robert Chambers (1844). Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation and Other Evolutionary Writings. University of Chicago Press.
    Originally published anonymously in 1844, Vestiges proved to be as controversial as its author expected. Integrating research in the burgeoning sciences of anthropology, geology, astronomy, biology, economics, and chemistry, it was the first attempt to connect the natural sciences to a history of creation. The author, whose identity was not revealed until 1884, was Robert Chambers, a leading Scottish writer and publisher. Vestiges reached a huge popular audience and was widely read by the social and intellectual elite. (...)
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  20.  16
    Paul Lettinck (2011). Science in Adab Literature. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 21 (1):149-163.
    Books belonging to adab literature present material about a variety of subjects, considered from various points of view, such as religious, scientific, historical, literary, etc. They contain knowledge and at the same time entertainment for educated people. Here we consider the content of two adab works, insofar as they discuss subjects from the scientific point of view: Fa???l al-Khi?????b by al-T??f??sh?? and Mab??hij al-fikar wa-man??hij al-??ibar by al-Wa???w????? . Al-T??f??sh??'s work discusses astronomical and meteorological subjects. The passages on astronomy give (...)
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  21.  5
    M. J. D. Roberts (1998). The Concept of Luxury in British Political Economy: Adam Smith to Alfred Marshall. History of the Human Sciences 11 (1):23-47.
    In the discourse of 18th-century British intellectuals the term 'luxury' held a well-recognized and much disputed place. Dispute arose chiefly around the problem of disentangling the economic, moral-theological and political strands of the term. The object of the present paper is to trace forward the history of debate over the concept along one develop ing line of specialization - that of 19th-century political economy. It will be seen how the term luxury (and related terms: necessity, decency, productive, unproductive, etc.) adjusted (...)
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