Search results for 'Eliza Congdon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  45
    Agatha Lenartowicz, Donald J. Kalar, Eliza Congdon & Russell A. Poldrack (2010). Towards an Ontology of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):678-692.
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  2. Howard K. Congdon (ed.) (2003). Philosophies of Space and Time. Upa.
    In Philosophies of Space and Time, Howard Congdon presents a collection of readings from antiquity to the present, showing how philosophers have thought about and understood the concepts of space and time. This examination shows how human thinking has evolved in attempting to answer the questions embedded in the concepts of space and time.
     
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  3. Matthew Congdon (2015). Epistemic Injustice in the Space of Reasons. Episteme 12 (1):75-93.
    In this paper, I make explicit some implicit commitments to realism and conceptualism in recent work in social epistemology exemplified by Miranda Fricker and Charles Mills. I offer a survey of recent writings at the intersection of social epistemology, feminism, and critical race theory, showing that commitments to realism and conceptualism are at once implied yet undertheorized in the existing literature. I go on to offer an explicit defense of these commitments by drawing from the epistemological framework of John McDowell, (...)
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  4.  4
    Lee Congdon (2004). Arnold Hauser and the Retreat From Marxism. In Tamás Demeter (ed.), Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy. Rodopi 41--61.
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  5. Matt Congdon (2013). Endangered Scholars Worldwide. Social Research: An International Quarterly 80 (1):5-14.
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  6.  9
    Matthew Congdon (forthcoming). Wronged Beyond Words On the Publicity and Repression of Moral Injury. Philosophy and Social Criticism:0191453715580158.
    In this article, I discuss cases in which moral grievances, particularly assertions that a moral injury has taken place, are systematically obstructed by received linguistic and epistemic practices. I suggest a social epistemological model for theorizing such cases of moral epistemic injustice. Towards this end, I offer a reconstruction of Lyotard’s concept of the differend, comparing it with Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice, and considering it in light of some criticisms posed by Axel Honneth. Through this reconstruction and a (...)
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  7.  12
    Matthew Congdon (2015). Epistemic Injustice in the Space of Reasons – Erratum. Episteme 12 (3):427.
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  8.  31
    Lee Congdon (2005). Polanyi and the Sadness of Unbelief. Tradition and Discovery 32 (3):12-14.
    Among other important things, William T. Scott and Martin X. Moleski’s biography of Michael Polanyi raises questions concerning the scientist-Philosopher’s religious convictions. Despite his profound respect for Christianity, he suffered from an inability to believe.
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  9.  12
    Lee Congdon (1997). Between Brothers. Tradition and Discovery 24 (2):7-13.
    This article explores the Polanyi brothers’ publicly-stated views--and private debates--concerning the nature and origin of fascism and communism. In that connection, it examines their rival estimates of the Soviet regime.
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  10.  15
    Matthew Congdon (2013). Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, by Robert Stern. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 34 (1):230-234.
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  11.  21
    Lee Congdon (2008). For Neoclassical Tragedy: György Lukács's Drama Book. Studies in East European Thought 60 (1/2):45 - 54.
    Before he joined the Communist Party, the young György Lukács published an outstanding history of the modern drama in which he combined sociological analysis with aesthetic judgment. By doing so he called his countrymen's attention to a new and insightful approach to the study of literature. At the same time, he made a strong case for the superiority of neoclassical tragedy—largely inspired by personal experience.
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  12. Lee Congdon (2006). Aurel Kolnai, Sexual Ethics: The Meaning and Foundations of Sexual Morality Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (4):267-269.
     
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  13.  12
    Matthew Congdon (2010). The Significance of §§76 and 77 Of the Critique of Judgment for the Development of Post-Kantian Philosophy (Part 2). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 31 (2):323-347.
  14.  7
    Matthew Lyons Congdon (2008). Hegel's Guilty Conscience: Three Forms of Schuld in the Phenomenology of Spirit. Phaenex 3 (1):32-55.
    In what we might call its particularly Christian manifestation, “guilt” denotes the feeling or fact of having offended, the failure to uphold an ethical code. Under such terms, “guilt” connotes negative consequences: shame, punishment, and estrangement. Yet, penetrating further into its meaning and value, one finds that guilt extends beyond this narrow classification, playing a productive, necessary, and ineluctable role for recognitive sociality. This paper examines guilt as it appears in Hegel’s thinking. I find that Hegel’s understanding of Schuld (guilt) (...)
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  15.  5
    C. E. Vafopoulou-Richardson & L. O. K. Congdon (1984). Caryatid Mirrors of Ancient Greece: Technical, Stylistic and Historical Considerations of an Archaic and Early Classical Bronze Series. Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:263.
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  16.  14
    Lee Congdon (2007). Apotheosizing the Party: Lukács's Chvostismus Und Dialektik. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):281 - 292.
    Georg Lukács's recently discovered defense of Geschichte und Klassenbewusstsein, written in 1925 or 1926 in reply to critical attacks by László Rudas and Abram Deborin, is of a piece with that earlier work and his Lenin of 1924. In its emphasis on the pivotal role and absolute authority of the Communist Party as the incarnation of the class consciousness of the proletariat, it is Leninist to the core. For many contemporary Marxist theorists, including the Lukács disciple István Mészáros, such an (...)
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  17.  4
    Matthew Congdon (2009). Derrida and Other Animals. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2009 (148):185-191.
    The scene of philosophical interest in nonhuman animal life seems to have always been lacking in robust theoretical resources. The philosophical canon from ancient Greece onward contains only a few rare exceptions, and even in the past century, when research on nonhuman animals seems to have gained new momentum, this interest has remained confined primarily to conversations having to do with the moral status of animal life, with these discussions roughly divided into two major camps: animal rights discourse and a (...)
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  18. Lee Congdon (2007). Apotheosizing the Party: Lukács’s Chvostismus Und Dialektik. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):281-292.
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  19. M. Congdon (2009). Derrida and Other Animals. Télos 2009 (148):185-191.
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  20. Lee Congdon (2008). For Neoclassical Tragedy: György Lukács’s Drama Book. Studies in East European Thought 60 (1-2):45-54.
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  21. Kristin G. Congdon (1986). Finding the Tradition in Folk Art: An Art Educator's Perspective. Journal of Aesthetic Education 20 (3):93-106.
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  22. Howard K. Congdon & John Hick (1981). The Pursuit of Death. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (2):123-124.
     
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  23. Lee Congdon (1981). The Tragic Sense of Life : Lukác's "the Soul and the Forms". In János Kristóf Nyíri (ed.), Austrian Philosophy: Studies and Texts. Philosophia-Verlag
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  24.  7
    Sandra J. Peacock (2006). Struggling with the Daimon:Eliza M. Butler on Germany and Germans. History of European Ideas 32 (1):99-115.
    In 1935, the British scholar Eliza M. Butler published The Tyranny of Greece Over Germany, in which she explored the appeal of Greek art and poetry to modern German writers. She argued that Hellenism had exerted a baleful influence on German literature and culture, and that Germans were especially—even dangerously—susceptible to the power of ideas. In her view, the most dangerous Hellenic concept to German culture and society was the daimon, which had reached Germany via the work of Winckelmann. (...)
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  25. H. R. Luhning (2010). Entertainment and Didacticism: Eliza Haywood's The Unequal Conflict and Fatal Fondness. Lumen 29:161-174.
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  26.  2
    Sarah Davis-Secord (2014). Eleanor A. Congdon, Ed., Latin Expansion in the Medieval Western Mediterranean. Farnham, Surrey, UK, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Variorum, 2013. Pp. Xxviii, 398; Black-and-White Figures. $200. ISBN: 978-1-4094-5509-7. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (4):1126-1128.
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  27.  2
    William F. MacLehose (2015). Florence Eliza Glaze and Brian K. Nance, Eds., Between Text and Patient: The Medical Enterprise in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Florence: SISMEL Edizioni Del Galluzzo, 2011. Paper. Pp. Xii, 570; 32 Black-and-White Plates. €72. ISBN: 978-88-8450-401-2. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (2):544-545.
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  28.  6
    Wendy Orr (2008). Steve Biko, Medical Student Leader of the South African “Black Con-Sciousness Movement,” Was Arrested on August 6, 1977, and Died on September 11 as a Result of Police Beatings. Biko Was Seen by Two Dis-Trict Surgeons Who Were Later Accused of Failing to Render Adequate Atten-Tion. At the Time These Doctors Were Defended by the Medical Association of South Africa and the South African Medical and Dental Council. One of the Two Continued to Practice as a District Surgeon in the Port Eliza-Beth Region ... [REVIEW] In Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.), Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press 1111.
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  29.  8
    Carlos A. Picón (1983). Caryatid Mirrors Leonore O. Keene Congdon: Caryatid Mirrors of Ancient Greece: Technical, Stylistic and Historical Considerations of an Archaic and Early Classical Bronze Series. Pp. Xiv + 288; 97 Plates. Mainz: Philipp von Zabern, 1981. DM. 390. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (01):97-99.
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  30.  12
    László Perecz (2008). Lee Congdon: Seeing Red. Hungarian Intellectuals in Exile and the Challenge of Communism. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 60 (1-2):165-167.
  31.  1
    Holly Luhning (2010). Entertainment and Didacticism: Eliza Haywood's The Unequal Conflict and Fatal Fondness. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 29:161.
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  32.  2
    Juliette Merritt (1997). 'That Devil Curiosity Which Too Much Haunts the Minds of Women': Eliza Haywood's Female Spectators. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 16:131.
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  33.  2
    G. Kampis, L. Kvasz & M. Stoltzner (2002). Lee Congdon Lakatos'political Reawakening. In G. Kampis, L.: Kvasz & M. Stöltzner (eds.), Appraising Lakatos: Mathematics, Methodology and the Man. Kluwer 1--339.
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  34.  1
    Peter Cassirer (1983). What Became of Eliza Doolittle? A Case Study of the Sign in Fiction. Semiotica 44 (1-2).
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  35.  1
    G. J. V. Nossal (1985). Places: The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. Bioessays 2 (4):181-183.
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  36.  1
    Kate Williams (2004). 'The Force of Language, and the Sweets of Love': Eliza Haywood and the Erotics of Reading in Samuel Richardson's Clarissa. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 23:309.
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  37. Lyn Bennett (2015). Women, Writing, and Healing: Rhetoric, Religion, and Illness in An Collins, “Eliza,” and Anna Trapnel. Journal of Medical Humanities 36 (2):157-170.
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  38. Charles A. Corr (1981). Howard K. Congdon, "The Pursuit of Death". International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (2):123.
     
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  39. Kim Kleinman (2003). Eliza Frances Andrews.Journal of a Georgia Woman, 1870–1872. Edited by S. Kittrell Rushing. Xliv+142 Pp., Frontis., Illus., Bibl., Index. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002. $25. [REVIEW] Isis 94 (4):737-737.
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  40.  26
    Russell Blackford (2012). Robots and Reality: A Reply to Robert Sparrow. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):41-51.
    We commonly identify something seriously defective in a human life that is lived in ignorance of important but unpalatable truths. At the same time, some degree of misapprehension of reality may be necessary for individual health and success. Morally speaking, it is unclear just how insistent we should be about seeking the truth. Robert Sparrow has considered such issues in discussing the manufacture and marketing of robot ‘pets’, such as Sony’s doglike ‘AIBO’ toy and whatever more advanced devices may supersede (...)
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  41.  3
    Jack DuVall (2014). Dream Things True: Nonviolent Movements as Applied Consciousness. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):106-117.
    Nonviolent movements have become a new form of human agency. Between 1900 and 2006, more than 100 such movements appeared, and more than half were successful in dissolving oppression or achieving people's rights. Movements self-organize to summon mass participation, develop cognitive unity in the midst of dissension, and build resilient force on the content of shared beliefs. Some movements may even be a new venue for consciousness that "grows to something of great constancy" as Shakespeare said about "minds transfigured so (...)
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  42.  23
    Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2012). The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
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  43.  5
    Susan Dodds & Eliza Goddard (2013). Not Just a Pipeline Problem. In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP Usa 143.
  44.  13
    Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Eliza Bliss-Moreau, Hedy Kober & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2012). What Are Emotions and How Are They Created in the Brain? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):172-202.
    In our response, we clarify important theoretical differences between basic emotion and psychological construction approaches. We evaluate the empirical status of the basic emotion approach, addressing whether it requires brain localization, whether localization can be observed with better analytic tools, and whether evidence for basic emotions exists in other types of measures. We then revisit the issue of whether the key hypotheses of psychological construction are supported by our meta-analytic findings. We close by elaborating on commentator suggestions for future research.
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  45.  38
    Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2009). What's Reason Got to Do with It? Affect as the Foundation of Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):201-202.
    We propose that learning has a top-down component, but not in the propositional terms described by Mitchell et al. Specifically, we propose that a host of learning processes, including associative learning, serve to imbue the representation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) with affective meaning.
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  46. Eliza Block (2008). Indicative Conditionals in Context. Mind 117 (468):783-794.
    I discuss an argument given by Dorothy Edgington for the conclusion that indicative conditionals cannot express propositions. The argument is not effective against Robert Stalnaker's context-dependent propositional theory. I isolate and defend the feature of Stalnaker's theory that allows it to evade the argument.
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  47.  46
    Penelope Deutscher (2004). The Descent of Man and the Evolution of Woman. Hypatia 19 (2):35-55.
    : This paper addresses the appropriation of theories of evolution by nineteenth-century feminists, focusing on the critical response to Darwin's The Descent of Man by Eliza Burt Gamble (The Evolution of Woman, 1893) and Antoinette Brown Blackwell (The Sexes Throughout Nature, 1875) and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's social evolutionism. For Gilman, evolutionism was a revolutionary resource for feminism, one of its greatest hopes. Gamble and Blackwell revisit Darwin's data with the aim of locating, amidst his ostensive conclusions to the contrary, (...)
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  48.  19
    Katherine S. Button, Glyn Lewis, Marcus R. Munafò, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2012). Understanding Emotion: Lessons From Anxiety. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):145.
    We agree that conceptualisation is key in understanding the brain basis of emotion. We argue that by conflating facial emotion recognition with subjective emotion experience, Lindquist et al. understate the importance of biological predisposition in emotion. We use examples from the anxiety disorders to illustrate the distinction between these two phenomena, emphasising the importance of both emotional hardware and contextual learning.
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  49.  11
    Andreas Matthias (2015). Robot Lies in Health Care: When Is Deception Morally Permissible? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (2):169-162.
    From the very beginnings of Artificial Intelligence, the users’ misjudgment of a machine’s capabilities has been one of the recurrent topoi. Weizenbaum reports the surprising reaction of users to the crude conversational capabilities of the now-famous “Eliza” program :I was startled to see how quickly and how deeply people conversing with “Doctor” became emotionally involved with the computer and how unequivocally they anthropomorphized it. Once my secretary, who had watched me work on the program for many months and therefore (...)
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  50. Lauren Gail Berlant (2008). The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture. Duke University Press.
    Poor Eliza -- Pax Americana : the case of Show boat -- National brands, national body : Imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : Now, voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : Landscape for a good woman and The life and loves of a she-devil.
     
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